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Hello,

I am extremely nearsighted (myopia would be the hifalutin word.) I am a -10 in one eye and a -10.5 in the other (not sure which is which) and I have astigmatism to boot. That translates to blinder than a bat without sonar. I wear plastic super high index lenses in very small frames to keep my nose from sliding off my face under all the weight like the sphinx in Egypt.

The other day I was riding a bus and they had some LED lights at varying locations along the length of the bus. When I would look at the light straight on, through the middle of my lenses, they appeared normal. However if I turned my head from side to side or moved it up or down I realized that where I perceived the lights to be shifted. And the farther away the LEDs were the worse the perceived displacement. I looked this up online and the technical term for this is chromatic aberration. After lots of reading that involved words even longer than that I found that this translates to a simple rule. Look through the center of your lenses for best picture, and do this by pointing your nose at whatever you are looking at.

I used to be an avid shooter. But I haven't shot much in years, and admittedly I was nothing to get excited about back then. And my eyes continued to get worse after I got rid of the guns. I want to get a .22 to get back into shooting.

My question is whether the high index glasses could be a problem. Could I be shooting at things that are really a few inches away from where I think they are? Does anyone here have super high index lenses that shoots well? Is a scope a better option than irons for me?

Thanks,

AZ
 

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I would call your eye doctor and ask him the question. If he does not know call your oculist.

Also go to a store that sells scopes and look through them. Sometimes rifles for sale have scopes on them that you can look through also.
 

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This should be a smaller problem when using a scope. Contact lenses would improve this distortion greatly since they are much closer to your eye lens so that the refraction is greatly reduced. But so too will the sights be in this refracted plane when using your glasses so you should be on target. However it is an annoyance caused by this distortion.
 
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