Shooters Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
There's just something about the look of an antique firearm that I really love.
Not only does a well worn finish give it "character", but in my mind, it reeks of history.
Having said that, I think todays replicas sorta lack "mojo".

So have any of you artificially relic'd your black powder replicas?
If so, what are some of the techniques that you've used?

Pics would be great too! :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,451 Posts
Given that estimates of the number of antique firearms on the market that are forgeries are now as high as 70%, there must be a lot of information around about doing that? For wear, just taking one in and out of a saddle holster should do the job. Just be aware that collecting value increases with % intact finish, so if the gun you are going to mess with has any chance of ever becoming a collecting item, you may want to reconsider?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
397 Posts
Lend it to me for a couple of seasons. When I
get done with it you will think General Custer used
it in the battle of the Big Horn.

Zeke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Given that estimates of the number of antique firearms on the market that are forgeries are now as high as 70%, there must be a lot of information around about doing that? For wear, just taking one in and out of a saddle holster should do the job. Just be aware that collecting value increases with % intact finish, so if the gun you are going to mess with has any chance of ever becoming a collecting item, you may want to reconsider?
Speaking of replicas only.
And I seriously doubt just taking it in and out of a holster is going to do much unless it's over a long period of time.

I'm sorry, but I don't think you read my post. :confused:
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,451 Posts
My idea was that since forgers are the persons most practiced at giving antique wear appearance to guns, and given how common antique forgeries are, that there must be a lot of gun antiquing methods that are fairly well-known. If you look for articles on that subject (how to spot forgeries, for example) you may learn something useful for antiquing your replica? I assumed that's what you meant by "relic'd"? Or did I miss something there?

Holster wear will tend to rub bluing off the sides of the muzzle and where the forearm stock finish rubs it. It's kind of like stropping a razor. How many hours you'd have to spend at it to get the result you want, I don't know? Like hand lapping a rifle bore, it would involve a good bit of elbow grease, and perhaps a number of weeks of putting in some daily effort? But at least the wear marks would be in the right location for a saddle gun. Maybe holster wear isn't the kind of antiquing you want, or maybe that's more effort than you want to put in? You'd have to decide that for yourself?
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
36,751 Posts
Fill holster full of sand first :D
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,451 Posts
Yeah, I had visions of buffing compound going in, but jeez, I'd still want to be able to use the holster afterward.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,537 Posts
You can get Uberti firearms with an antique finish. Its only a little extra. I think Im going to get a couple as you cant hurt the finsh unless you let it rust. Then I dont have to worry about putting scratches on a new gun. They will be pre-scratched.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
Seriously, friend -- USE the gun! Holster it, draw it, shoot it, a bunch. Carry it in the woods. Kept it in the car for a few days. Maintain it, but don't pamper it. USE IT! It will look used very soon, and you will have done it just the way the oldtimers did it. Believe me, it won't take long...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I removed the blueing from my replicas using "lemonacid"
Shoting blackpowder and not cleaning them right away tends to age them nicely :eek:
These are my Remington 1858 twins that i modified. (italian clones)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
I've had to age parts to match Civil War cart guns, and have "aged" a stainless steel part to match the cleanout screw on a Smith carbine using heat-tempering. I use judicious (?) application of Brownell's Oxpho-Blue over parts brightened with OOO or OOOO steel wool.

Larger parts or entire weapons get the "Andrew" treatment - named in honor of the hurricane and my younger brother. Pack the action, bbl, mag, etc with grease. Then wet a rag with alcohol, rub down the piece, step out on the back porch (preferably in the rain) and throw it in the back yard. Once the grass is dry, go pick it up and clean it. Repeat as neccessary.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top