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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everybody! I have a couple questions about wild hog hunting. I live up in Connecticut and recently bought a Marlin 336RC in 30-30 and an airgun for cheap training. Now, I would like to get started hunting. I am kind of on a budget for now, and cannot drive far. I Heard that there was a little bit of hog hunting in Pennselvania for hogs that had escaped the reserves. Are there any good spots that you guys know of? Any tips for hunting hogs? And since this will be one of my very first hunts, what equipment would I need? Book reccomendations would be awesome. Also, since I didn't find another place for this, I have a question about taking my 336 to Russia. I am going there for the first time to visit close family that I haven't seen in a while and would like some info on the permitsni would need to bring my rifle there. Thanks!
 

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You're on a pig-hunting budget, but you're going to visit family in Russia? Instead of dragging a gun along, find someone there with an old 91/30 in 7.62x54R?

Asking guys to give up their hunting spots in an area with relatively few pigs is not likely to garner a lot of replies. You can try asking local game wardens and they will share what they know, but they've probably told a dozen other guys the same stuff.

What I have done is identify a general area where pigs are reported to be on the loose. Then, get some good maps and trace the watersheds in that area. Pigs stay close to the heavy cover around river bottoms just about year 'round. Now, with these maps in hand, go knocking on some doors. You might just find a farmer who is tired of those blankety-blank hogs tearing up his fields. If you get permission, do some long-distance scouting before you move in. Wild pigs are notoriously nocturnal and as easy to spook from an area as a mature buck, so don't go blundering into an area without getting an idea how they're using it.

Also, in most states, pig-hunting can be done at night. Some guys use night-vision scopes and others will bait an area, set up some kind of lighting, and start shooting as soon as they flip the switch. Once you have gone to all this trouble to figure out where and how to hunt hogs in a given area...are YOU going to hand out that information, free of charge, on the internet? ;)
 

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forget taking a gun (even a rifle to Russia). You would have to declare that you booked a hunt with a guide, and get his paper work.


There really are NO wild hogs in hunting population in PA. I keep hoping. But been hunting there for 50+ years, groundhogs , deer, bear, coyotes........never saw a wild hog in PA nor did any of my buddies. the PA flap about hogs is because there were a few, and the PA game Commision denied any responsibility to regulate them (shoot if you want). But the PA Supreme Court ruled they MUST regulate and plan for hogs.

I've killed hogs in Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and West Virginia. The further south you go the more hog hunting you will get.

Try the 30-30 on some local groundhogs, lots of fun and close to you. the 130 grain bullets work good.
 

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I'm on a budget because I'm going to Russia, in addition to saving up for a new house (read:more expensive) and this is the first time we (me and my family here) can go because we got vacations from work, little kids grew up, etc. I'll be hunting on my grandfather's land, where it will be more like pest control since the bait will be his garden :) . I guess I'll just buy a night-vision scope.
 

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If you talk to anyone, and I mean ANYONE, who lives in a place where hogs have become established, you will find that nobody should be "hoping" that they come to his area or state. They ARE fun to shoot, but way too hard on the native flora/fauna. Go hunt them where they are and thank your lucky stars if they haven't invaded your area, yet.
 

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I would asume the Russian Embassy would provide all of the information you require. European hunters regularly make hunting trips into Russia and there are a number of reputable outfitters there. Having hauled a rifle/rifles to many parts internationally, the days when you flew into even the USA and the only thing the Customs or Immigration man wanted to do was talk hunting are long gone. Lots of advanced form filling etc., so the suggestion that you arrange the loan of a rifle when out there is perhaps a good one. Just make sure you have a few shots on paper before hunting though, not like my friend who flew 6000 miles to use the outfitters rifle and missed a superb colour phase black bear because he didn't check the rifle. To be fair the outfitter stated the rifle was zeroed ...it wasn't!!
 
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