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Discussion Starter #1
To Marshall and All...I wish I could say the first test with the BTB. 358" 185 gr.FNGC was successful, but some problems arose. The test were done using a Remington Mod 141 of known accuracy. The first load @ 28.8 grs RE7 and the second @ 32 grs RE7. No pressure signs and primers looked good. Groups at 30 yards test site were well under 1", however...upon checking the feeding out of the mag tube, it was found that the ogive of the bullet was well engarved with the grooves of the bore. This is puzzling to me since most.35 Remingtons are known to have ample throats for factory 200 gr. roundnose bullets. I then examined all jacketed bullets in house for the .35 Remington. I found that most were a full .358", which is the same as my batch of BTB 185 grs, however the ogive of the jacketed bullets broke off at the cannelure more abrupt than the BTB 185's did at the crimp groove. If the Contender barrels are set up this way, there may be problems. The simple solution would be to order a .358" throat reamer from JGS and slightly lengthen the throat. Many would not want to go to this added expense. The Remington showed no sign of wanted to pull the bullet out of the case. There was no sign of leading with these two loads, however this rifle's bore is extremely smooth! At this point I am thinking over the situation, however this bullet shows a tremendous accuracy potential!
Best Regards, James
 

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James,

This was exactly what I found with the 180 WLN in my 35 Rem Marlin just yesterday. My Contender barrel in 35 Rem has a slightly longer throat and allows me to seat this bullet to the base of the neck shoulder juncture. This places the crimp groove below the rim of the case neck and I crimp it with a Factory Crimp die.

I was pondering what to do about the 35 Marlin rifle. You are right about the mistaken belief that the 35 Rem should have a long throat but, it really doesn't. You observed correctly that the nose taper on a jacketed bullet tapers immediately ahead of the cannelure. I ran into the same condition with my 358 Bellm chamber throat.

The LBT Designs all tend to have a longer forward driving band ahead of the crimp groove which can affect seating depth. My cartridge OAL for the Contender barrel is 2.318" with the 180 WLN G/C bullet.(35 Rem)

With the same bullet in a case for the Marlin rifle, I have to seat the bullet to a depth where the check is below the neck. I'll have to ponder this situation a little more.

At least for now I can use the 180 WFN in my Contender which is what I really wanted to do. What would be ideal is the 180 WLN with an ogive that immediately tapered after the crimp groove yet kept the same meplat diameter at the nose.

I have a couple of the 185 gr. samples so I will try them in my Marlin for fit and let you know.

Throat lengthening would be the way to go as you say as some of these guns are throated really for jacketed bullets.

Regards



:cool:
 

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Well, went out to the bench and did some follow-up experimentation:

I found that the 180 gr.WLN seated to an overall loaded length of about 2.280" would allow the shell to chamber nicely in my Marlin rifle. It puts the check on the bullet a little below the case neck which in my opinion is OK as it is a crimp on check and no lube grooves are exposed. I crimped it with the Lee Factory Crimp die.

The only fly in the ointment may be a feeding problem as the wider longer nose can hit the top of the chamber opening and jam the shell there. However, It happened only once and I could not get it to do it again with a nice smooth rapid working of the cocking lever.

The 185gr. is another story. This bullet would have to be seated too deeply into the case to chamber IN MY GUN. It puts one lube groove into the case area. A throat reaming to another .1" or so in length would probably alleviate this problem. This is where the 2 diameter bore riding cast bullet comes in, otherwise.


FWIW


:cool:






(Edited by Contender at 11<!--emo&:0--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':0'><!--endemo-->4 pm on Mar. 26, 2001)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Friend Contender...I got sidetracked. On the 180 gr, did you crimp in the crimp groove to get that QAL? The same hitting one the top face of the barrel with the 280 OWC. However if you work the lever smartly, it wiggles in OK. Hank shot some nice groups with the 185 and 32 gr Re7. Altough the Rem. 141 engraves the ogive, it doesn't pull the bullet if you kick out the loaded round. The pump gun feeds great and when you close it there is some camming action as the lug seats. Doesn't look good on the bullet, but what the heck if you get good groups. Many cast bullet shooters say it's best to seat into the groves? One sure thing..there's no blowby when this thing lights off! Maybe we all will chip in in the future and get a throat reamer and leave it with Marshall ( or someone) and rent it out to those who want to work on the throats. After the cost of the reamer is paid back, let the Forum (registered members) use it free gratis? Have the reamer cut to the configuration of the revolver throat? I don't have any of the 180's to check in the Rem 141, but lean toward the 185's since the boys have seen what it will do on flesh and heavy bone! The .280 meplat is about perfect and feeds with no problem. My next project is to work up a load, using 800X, with the 280 OWC. That should really"honk and howl" out of the 1894P! Well, back to the drawing board!
Best Regards, James
 

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James,

Yes I crimped it(180gr) above the crimp groove nearer the ogive with the Factory Crimp die. I'll send ya a couple of samples to eyeball.



Regards



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