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I wanted to ask what to look for when purchasing a used air rifle. There are a couple of Daystate air rifles for sale and thinking of purchasing one. I know of the need to buy an air pump but will save that for later. I don't know the model numbers but look very near the Air Wolf model. Is there any procedure to test other than firing? Thank you.
 

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Are you buying from a reputable seller/dealer? About the only thing that could be wrong with it would be an air leak, and they can be fixed by sending the gun off to a dealer to get repaired. It’s not something you’d want to try on your own without the proper training. I own a Daystate, and I’ve had it for three years now. It has functioned flawlessly since the day I got it. I did a lot of research on all brands of PCP guns before selecting my Daystate Huntsman with the match target barrel. Shooting it across my chronograph it shows amazing shot-to-shot repeatability in FPS, and after trying fifty different pellets through it I’ve found that JSB’s and AirArms 18g pellets are the most accurate. The gun will shoot in the .2’s five shot groups at fifty yards on a calm day. It easily shoots as well as my Anschutz, T-Bold, and CZ rimfires at that distance. I can tell you that you’re going to have to get a pump in order to shoot it. There’s no other way to fill the gun’s reservoir other than using a pump, compressor, or SCBD tank. The pump is the cheapest way to fill it. Not the quickest, or the easiest, but the cheapest. In spite of my age (in my 70’s) I can pump the reservoir in about three minutes of vigorous pumping and not kill myself in the process. However, I like to shoot more than I like to pump so I bought a SCBD bottle. It costs me about twelve bucks to get the bottle refilled after several thousand rounds of shooting….a pretty good deal. Can you share what model you’re getting and where you got it? I may be able to give you some more insight.
 

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The test is if the gun will hold air overnight, Daystates are pretty much the top of the heap for design and quality. Most of the used ones that come on the market are probably being sold because there's a newer model that the seller just has to have. Unlikely there's anything wrong with a used one, bubba's usually don't lay out that kind of money for airguns. I've had both tanks and hand pumps, dislike both of them. I bought a compressor off Amazon, works off the truck battery or 110, it's about the size of a bowling ball bag and the same weight. I have the valve and hammer spring jacked up pretty high on my FX, only get 25 shots per fill. The reservoir pressure cannot be drained lower than the regulator pressure or the gun will be damaged. That being said everyone's situation is different,if you live close to a dive shop and have the gun setup for target shooting at low velocities you'll get lots of shooting from a tank. I have an old scba tank but it's a long ways to a dive shop from where I live. It takes 2 minutes to top off my gun with a compressor, anywhere there's 110 or 12volt battery.
 

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My PCP is down on the lower cost of the scale, Air Venturi Avenger. I love it!! It's a double regulated gun and is fairly quiet and accurate. I got a compressor to fill the gun and it's very deadly in pest control.
 

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Might be what is known as a 2 stage regulator, first one reduces from very high pressure (hard to do accurately) to an intermediate much lower but varying pressure. The second stage further reduces (much more accurately) to the final pressure.

I'm not a PCP airgunner so I don't know if this industrial practice is in play in that market.
 

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Kevin; it's just the clumsy way I said it. It has two regulator gauges; one to adjust the max air fill and another to regulate the amount of pressure per shot.
 

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More accurately described as the reservoir pressure and the regulator pressure,common mistake with people that are new to PCP guns no worries! I'm still learning stuff about them as well after 3 years of owning them
 

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Some Daystate Huntsman models have a HUMA regulator and a patented slingshot valve, both of which control air usage when firing. This could be what is being referred to as “two regulators”. I know their system works, I can fire ten shots over my chronograph with only about 2-3 fps difference between all ten shots. I’m getting an average of 845fps per shot with 18.1g pellets before I “fall off” the regulator after approx. 45-48 shots. It still shoots good after that, but the fps starts to vary and increase between high and low.
 

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Huma-air is a popular after market company in the Netherlands, sort of like a Brownells for airguns. They have stuff you never imagined you needed! They have an upgraded part for every pcp made.
 

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I wanted to ask what to look for when purchasing a used air rifle. There are a couple of Daystate air rifles for sale and thinking of purchasing one. I know of the need to buy an air pump but will save that for later. I don't know the model numbers but look very near the Air Wolf model. Is there any procedure to test other than firing? Thank you.
Depending on what caliber you will be shooting and what your going to be using it for , here are a couple of suggestions.... for a good reasonable priced .22 pcp Rifle I would recommend the .22 Umarex Origin.
For a.35 pcp I would recommend the Hatsan Carnivore.35
I own both of these and have been impressed with them.
 

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Both of those guns are chinese, I've never had one that lasted very long, just say'in. If your going to set it in the corner and shoot the occasional varmint out the back door they're probably fine but if that's the intended purpose a spring gun would be a better choice.
 

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Reddust2116, stay the course on the Daystate choice. I’m not saying that they’re the best, but they are arguably one of the best. They are definitely a top tier air rifle. Get a good gun to start and worry about compressors and SCBD fill methods later. You’ll get by fine with a pump for quite a while if funds are a big part of your decision process. Don’t skimp on the gun, you’ll have regrets later. Skimp a little now on the fill method. The Daystate will be worth more in the long run than a cheaper gun will be. Visit a few air gun web sites like AirgunNation. It won’t take long to see where your money will be best spent. Good luck whatever your decision.
 

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IMO there's 4 manufacturers that make great conventional looking pcp guns{not into the spacegun look}.
Daystate, RAW, FX and AirArms. My local airgun dealer likes Brocock as well, I have no experience with them.
Utah airguns hosts a benchrest competition every year, people show up from all over the world, what do the top shooters use... Daystate, everytime.
 

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Sorry I didn't bother to look up what a Daystate Air wolf was, it's one of those spacegun air rifles!!
If you were buying new I would say look at the FX models as well, they make a bunch of those types of guns.
Many of the FX guns are like erector sets, you can change every part on the gun in a few minutes to create a completely different rifle, calibers, stocks, pretty much everything.
A dreamline like mine can be made into a bullpup, or a carbine with a folding stock, or a rifle with a bottle or a dozen other variations including any caliber from 177 to 30.
My very conventional looking Dreamline.
 
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