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Hello group,

After firing a friends muzzleloader over the summer, I have received from Mrs. Claus a Lyman "Great Planes" 50 cal, flintlock muzzleloader. Now I need to set up my shooter's box since this is the first black power rifle I own. I know this is a very broad question, but is there any suggestions out there?

Thanks in advance!
 

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.

First - Welcome to TFL !

Second - Please be aware that a flinchlock is quite a bit above a starting-level gun, and the best practice for you would be to read up about it's idiocyncracies.

Third - The GPR is a very good production frontstuffer, with a fairly good quality lock, so it will respond to certain methods.

You will need to know whether your rifle has the 1"66 twist best for patched rould lead balls (PRB's), or a 1:28 twist best for conicals - but I'm pretty sure the GPR was 1:66 & the Great Plains Hunter (GPH) was 1;28.

You will need real black powder (aka: Holy Black ;) ), as the BP substitutes (like Pyrodex/etc) won't ignite or work very well in a rocklock. (Some folks, however, use Hogdon's Triple Seven - 777 - BP substitute)

You should use good quality flints (plural - keep a few in your possibles bag), only.

You should obtain an adjustable powder measure - pour from BP container to measure, then from measure to either barrel or speedloader.

I would suggest you hie thee to a fabric store or the fabric section of a WallyWorld, and buy some pillow ticking, to lubricate & use for boolit patches.

You can either buy commercial .490" RB's to fit your rifle, or pour your own (U will need lead, a melting pot, a RB mold, and a means to transfer the molten lead from pot to mould)

For cleaning, after every day's shooting, I would suggest either a 6" ramrod (RR) extension, or buying an entire long (36" or so) range rod for the cleaning and/or bullet pulling ( we ALL have dry-balled, and a screw-jag will be needed for pulling).
A bore-sized cleaning jag is useful for cleaning the bore with hot water, as a patch around it will seal the bore while the RR's used to pump hot water from the immersed vent hole into/throughout the bore.

A spiral wire worm, for the end of your cleaning rod, is useful for retrieving cleaning or lubing patches from downbore, if/when one slips off the cleaning jag.

As an alternative to plain hot water, you could also use commercially-available Moose Milk (aka: T/C #13 Bore Cleaner) to clean the bore, vent & flash pan.

While a shooting box of most any kind would suffice for the firing range, if you plan on hunting the rifle, a Possibles Bag is very helpful.


There are several good outlets to obtain much of your needs - google: Track of the Wolf, The Possibles Shop, and others.


I would also heartily recommend some reading, over on the Traditional Muzzle-Loading forum: Forums - Traditional Muzzleloading Forum - Muzzleloader Flintlock Black Powder

Recommended BP loads can use the T/C handbook as a starting (and ending) point: (use the Hawken data) Start @ 70gr FFg, up to a max of 110gr FFg, measured, not weighed.

Since a flintlock should use a powder grade finer than FFg for priming, rather than buy/carry two powders, I've always used FFFg grade for both in my .50cal ( I have an Austin & Halleck Mountain Rifle)


This loading stuff should be in the owner's manual of your GPR: http://hunting.about.com/od/blackpowder/ht/htloadbprifle.htm



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Graphics1974,

Welcome to the Forum; I see this is your first post.

I have 5 flintlocks and 5 percussion muzzleloaders. After 45+ years with them, I recommend you buy and read the "Lyman Black Powder" Handbook cover-to-cover before you go shoot your Christmas gift. The Lyman book is a very good read and will help you focus future questions here.

Again, welcome to this site.

Webley
 

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Welcome to the forum, Graphics1974. Yes, there is a learning curve with flintlocks that you don't have with percussion. There are folks on this forum who can help you with any problem you may encounter.
 

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Welcome to the Shooter's Forum!

Another vote for Lyman's black powder book, it will answer questions you haven't thought of asking yet.
 

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1- With flintlocks, follow through becomes much more vital than with modern guns. There is always a short hangfire with a flintlock frontstuffer. Hold your follow through!

2- Buy a black powder measurer, patch jag, patch worm, and a rod end that looks like a screw for removing stuck balls. Lastly, I bought a piece that screws directly on to a can of Goex black powder. It has a pour spout and allows me to pour from the can into the powder measurer. ALWAYS pour into a measurer, NOT into the gun!

3- Keep a few extra flints around.

4- There is a TON of discussion on what the best cleaner is. I like Thompson Center #13 ("moose milk"), but others will chime in with their favorites.

5- For a patch, I buy pillow ticking from a black powder supplier that is of a specified thickness. With my gun, a .490 ball with .017 pillow ticking over 90 grains of fffg works the best. Your gun may be different. Play with different combinations and consider swabbing the bore between shots to keep the fouling minimal.

6- Regarding your patch, it must be lubricated. There are just as many opinions on the best lubricant as there are black powder shooters. Personally, I keep my pillow ticking in a brass patch box and flood it with my TC #13 cleaner. The cleaner acts as a lubricant. Bear hunters out here in Colorado use bear fat. Others say Crisco, still others use a product called "bore butter." All will work just fine.

7- Throw some cleaning patches, pipe cleaners, and anything else you might use to clean your gun into your range box.

8- Add a knife to your range box. You'll need to cut the pillow ticking for each patch. It comes in strips and you'll have to cut each one to length.

9- Whatever screwdrivers fit your gun are also necessary. I've rarely had to disassemble my guns at the range, but it might just happen.

10- I bought a stainless steel ramrod from Treso. It has a wooden handle and the rod is about 3/8" in diameter. It fits into my .50 calibers just fine, and seats the balls a LOT easier than the smaller wooden rods stored under the gun. I only use those to reload when hunting. To load the first shot I use the steel one, and I use it for EVERY shot on the range, and all cleaning duties. The wooden ones are prone to breaking. They make fiberglass ones to replace those wooden ones when you break them, but they don't seem right on a flintlock! Get the steel ram rod; it doesn't replace the wooden one under your gun as it won't fit. But you'll use it for everything without breaking your other rod.

11- As a flintlock shooter, you'll also need a "vent pick" to clean the vent.

12- A lot of folks recommend ffffg to prime your pan. I think that gives the best ignition, but you won't charge the load with a powder that fine so you'll end up buying two different powders. They make a small "pan primer" you should buy; it's a very small brass powder horn you can keep the priming powder in. This will prevent you from confusing it with your charge powder, which will either be ffg or fffg (I like 3f because it ignites more consistently, but your mileage may vary).
 

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With a flinter, be sure you go with REAL black powder, not the subs that are extremely hard to impossible to ignite in a flinter. I to agree with the 3f, when i had few Flintlock GPR's I much preferred 3f in them as it ignited much faster.

Track of the Wolf - Muzzle Loading & Black Powder Guns Kits, Parts, Accoutrements, Rendezvous Gear & Primitive Americana
Dixie Gun Works muzzleloading, blackpowder and rare antique gun supplies.
Possible Shop Home

Great places to order your supplies from.

.490 round ball
.018" pillow tick patches " Blue and white striped"
Mr. Flintlocks patch lube "Just started using it and i love it so far!

When you lube your patches, let them soak it up good and then use your index finger and thumb to squeeze out the excess lube.
 
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