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hello all  , i recieved a reply to my posting on  a fix for 1894 cartridge carrier fix last week, but i was wondering if there is a link archive ect  or  diagrams
showing   how to  and  where to remove  metal from  front of carrier??/  any help would be great thank you very much all. david anderson.  by the way i have a marlin model 1894,
 

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Once you get the carrier out it is obvious where the metal needs to be removed.  As the cartridge comes out of the magazine, it is pushed backwards across the top of the lifting arm until it hits the step on the back of the carrier, stopping rearward movement.  Load up a few dummy rounds and watch them carefully as you cycle the action.  You will see how the step/stop on the rear of the carrier limits the travel of the cartridge.  If you want to shoot longer cartridges, you have to move the stop rearward so the cartridge is allowed to move farther back.  You "move" the stop rearward by removing metal by either careful filing or milling.  I am getting ready to do the same thing on my 1895G .45-70.  The new carrier should be here this week and I hope all I have to do is remove 0.100" of metal to allow the use of 2.650" OAL rounds.  There might be a problem with my ejector kicking out loaded rounds but I will cross the bridge when and if it comes.  That was why I bought a new carrier to experiment on, so if I screw it up, all I have to do is put back in the old carrier and keep on shooting.


Here is a copy/paste of Marshall's article:
The Marlin 1894 is sometimes finicky in it's COL limitations, however, there's a relatively easy fix for the problem. The cartridge lifter that brings the cartridge up from the magazine tube to the bolt, has a cartridge stop on it. In the Marlin 1894 it is a simple matter of disassembling the action, and removing this cartridge lifter. Once out, you may take a mill flat file, and carefully mill back the front face of the cartridge lifter 0.100" of an inch, without adversly affecting the action feeding reliability. Once done, any of the bullets with up to and including a .450" nose to crimp length will work great in your Marlin 1894.

This project is rather simple, and if not rushed is easy to accomplish. You will have the benefit of using just about any bullet you could possibly desire, and perfectly reliable feeding of those bullets.
 
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