Shooters Forum banner
  • Hello Everyone! Let us know what you would spend a $50 Amazon gift card on, HERE For a chance to win a $50 Amazon Gift Card!
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Purchased a fn browning high power 7mm mag safari grade, but I got a great on it due to the stock being cracked/split right behind the receiver. The rest of the rifle looks beautiful but now I'm on the hunt for a replacement stock if anyone happens to have one or knows of a compatible one it'd be greatly appreciated.

I will say I've contacted a few of the large vendors hoping for something of a response. This rifle is gorgeous and I'd rather not try to do the Fine Country Gentleman fix ( I am generally the one getting called it don't worry) and do the job weld or the weld tape I've seen for ax handles on the stock.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
First off, that's not a Browing Hi-Power, which is a 9mm pistol but it is a Browning Safari which is built on an FN action which is a Model 98 Mauser but there are differences in the bottom metal inletting. It is specifically a 1953 FN action Browning Safari. Contact ART'S GUN SHOP 6008 STATE RD Y HILLSBORO MO 63050. He could have an original.
That stock can be repaired, but he crack will always show. Somebody repaired the crack but didn't correct the bad bedding that caused it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Hawkeye Hunter

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
I don't remember that marking, but not surprising. It was 1972 when I worked on the last one. They don't usually break anything!
Once sold they don't come back.
That is the stock you're looking for and advice above still applies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Maybe so but in looking for a replacement apparently those salt wood stocks aren't exactly uncommon with cracking/splitting.
I tried checking out that site and looks like he has a good few browning shotgun parts. Didn't see to many rifle parts so emailed and the waiting game. Here's hoping find something before I look at secondary measures ( next closest compatible stock and some woodworking tools)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
Salt wood is why I was working on them. Have you had that one apart yet? There may not be much left if salty. I have a repaired Olympic grade stock with the finish stripped off if you want a project. It's salt wood that hasn't been sealed yet.
Art has a LOT more parts than he publishes and his his pulse on more.
Any 1953 FN stock will fit it. The 'tell' of the '53 is the floor plate release ahead of the trigger guard. Tradewinds imported guns with that action as well as Herters, but the stock designs are 'California ugly' not the classic FN.
I've looked for an hour for a picture I took many years ago of a M21 CZ broken exactly like yours, but fresh. The repair was hard to see, but I can't find the picture anyway. ;)
I'll dig out that Olympic stock and take pictures of it in case you're interested.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm doing it as a shooter grade so ugly is still workable lmao
How would you seal one of the salt wood stocks to remove further issue I guess is only way I can think of it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
In 1970, I was asked that question by Browning. They sent me ten salt wood T-Bolts for test.
There are no ways to remove the salt from the wood without ruining the stock, so sealing the salt away from the metal is the only choice. After quite a bit of experimentation with various sealers and then put the sandblasted metal parts back in the stock and exposed them to rainy, Florida thunderstorm atmosphere for a week to see how they fared. The best results was with thinned with acetone fiberglass resin epoxy. My instructions for other gunsmiths overseas said "Thin to the consistency of Vermont Maid syrup". Browning assured me they would know what that was. :unsure:

This was translated by somebody and then sent to five service centers in Europe including FN. I'll bet there were some rolled eyes. :)

Brush the inletting hard with a stiff wire hand brush, being careful of the edges and stock finish. Scrape the loose dust and debris right down to bare wood. be sure to scrape out the tang screw holes with a rough rattail file. Get rid of the dark stained wood as much as possible without altering important fitments.
Remove buttpad/plate and grip cap and clean them too. Holes for wood screws will be re-drilled and SS screws used as replacements.

Degrease with acetone at least three times. Hang by the butt pad and paint acetone into the inletting so it drips off the fore end. (It eats stock finish). Leaving the cleaned wood rough and untouched, mix the epoxy twice as long as you think is too long and then add acetone to thin it. Mix well. Paint it on the inletting all over in a hurry and then go back and add more to places that have gone dull for the epoxy being absorbed into the wood. Feed it all the epoxy it will take. Let the excess run off the front end. Disposable 1/2inch acid flux brushes are perfect for this job.
Let set for about 24 hours at at least 75F AND the epoxy is hard with no hint of softness. Inspect really well. Re-apply thinned epoxy to any places still not sealed. End grain is especially porous and will absorb more than the barrel channel.

Check for metal fit. Relieve what is needed but then re-seal any raw wood exposed in the process.
Traditional glass bedding will stick to the new sealer but not well. Rough it up with really coarse sandpaper (80 grit) but only enough to get a grip. Try not to expose any of that toxic wood to anything metal.

Not in the instructions but pertinent-- The steel cross bolts are a REAL problem and PITA. Some are rusted in and cant be removed. Removal of even the good ones is sometimes hazardous to the stock.

Browning fixed hundreds of stocks by this method in several service centers. Complete guns were sent in by the dozens at times for evaluation. I was in the SE so most were Superposed shotguns and T-bolts with a dozen or more Safaris thrown in each year.
Many of the high grand Superposed and Superposed sets were ruined beyond salvage. I tried to buy the stocks from them for repair and re-sale but Browning destroyed them (and the guns) instead. The repaired guns were sent to Arnold MO for refinishing, wood and metal.

Your gun seems to have been glued at one time and it rebroke, is that right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Honestly not sure on the broke/reglue part. Doesn't show any signs of epoxy/glue where the crack is.

So with an fn mauser stock how would the cross bolt issue be addressed ( I'm guess straight measure 5x drill once, then hand fit). As sadly the wood working seems like less of a pita than the amount of chem work to desalt the wood. ( never thought I'd have to say anything like that in my life)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
If the crack is 'fresh' without Bubba slobber in it, there's a good chance of a good sound stock.

The cross bolts in Browning stocks are the result of FN being a Mauser contractor for foreign military arms since 1900. Crossbolts were used in military Mausers for ease of manufacture, for the front one, and to prevent stock expansion under recoil for the back one. Today, cross bolts are only used for extreme recoil custom rifles.

The spanner holes used to tighten them in the FN commercials are not enough to remove them once salt does its thing on them. I tried drilling one side and driving, and drilling both sides and working at it. Neither was worth it so I scrapped the stock (sent it to Arnold Mo with a reject tag).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
To repair the crack-- You cant' force epoxy into the crack from the outside. Here's how to do it from the inside.

Clamp the cracked portion closed and be sure it all fits back together like it should.
With an extra long 1/8" drill bit, start the hole inside the inletting for the tang and drill down through the crack about half way the length of the crack. (yours is close to the surface so tricky)
Mix up clear 24 hr set epoxy and thin it with acetone so it runs better. Mix well and more than you think.
UNclamp the stock and start drizzling epoxy into the hole you drilled. Fill it up, then jam an 1/8" wood dowel into the hole to hydraulically force epoxy out of the hole and into the crack. Re-fill and do it again if it needs it.
When epoxy is running out of the crack, re-clamp the stock and run the dowel in all the way and nip it off flush.

If you will very carefully smear paste wax on the stock without getting any into the crack, the epoxy will peel right off the waxed portion and no refinish will be needed.
The checkering is probably 75 degree instead of American 90, so recutting has to be done with special tools.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So I got the stock glued. Gonna sand down the excess that came out. But so far looks/feels sturdy and the split is not visible anymore.
I will say that the front receiver screw isn't giving me any love on coming out. Have had liquid wrench soaking in and am half ready to try to easy out or just drill the screw out once I get the replacement screws in that I ordered.
Got a box of ammo though so gonna try to see how she shoots when I get a good day coming up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
A stuck front screw means the screw is too long and bottomed out in the hole. From experience, you can't feel the transition from screw to receiver metal. MEASURE first so you don't ruin the action.
Gunsmith's trick--- Hold the gun upside down in the drill press vise or mill vise. Hold the special ground screwdriver bit in the chuck. Using the feed handle for downforce and a long handled wrench on the bit as torque, they WILL come out with a loud pop.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
You have clear evidence of a salt wood rifle. Some rust the tang screws in half. You really need to see the bottom of that action to see how much is left of it.
If there is a motorcycle shop handy, see if you can borrow his impact screwdriver and hope you can find a flat blade for it. It operates by cam and hammer and they'll pull the toughest Phillips head out of Japanese crank-case.

My buddy says auto parts store lends impact screw drivers.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jdcujo and Pudfark
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top