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I want to start reloading 7mm rem mag, 30-06, 25-06 and 243. I'm still doing a lot of reading as I have never reloaded rifle cartridges. The two presses I'm looking at is the Forster and the Lee turret press. If both of these presses were the same price which would you get? Hopefully I will get some feedback from individuals who have had bench time with both but welcome all opinions.
I notice that you can purchase stand alone primer presses. Is there something wrong with using the reloading press for priming or does a stand alone just do a better job?
 

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As far as presses go your looking at a model T and a Lincoln if you comapired them to cars.
Priming I use the RCBS APS system mounted on the press, once setup the priming operation go's very smoothly.
 

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"If both of these presses were the same price which would you get?"

In that case, I'd get the Forster.

But, since they are NOT the same price, I'd get the Lee Classic Cast. The small potential we MIGHT gain from the Forster isn't worth the vast price difference. AND the ergonomics of the Lee are actually better, IMHO.

The quality of the ammo made by anyone is mostly determined by the skill of the user, not the press. The Lee CC is easily the superior press in its class.
 

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There is nothing wrong with the lee turret press, but the forester is probably better. If you are just starting I would get the lee turret press or the lee classic cast. Either one would make a great press to learn to reload. If you shoot competition or were going to start to shoot competition I would get the Forester. The Forester is almost definatly better aligned then the lee and there for it will have better centered ammunition. If you are looking for a good book to read to learn more about reloading I would read "Handloading for competition, making the target bigger." I myself am about half way through this book. There is a lot of things in this book that are over my head but it has a lot of good information.
 

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Instead of a turret press I would get a single stage press, for the calibers your loading a single stage will be fine-simpler is better. What press would I get? The same one metioned above-the Lee Classic Press hands down.
 

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The Forester is the lincoln of press's. There are some out there that are better, some in different ways but for what you want to do you can't go wrong with the Forester. It will be money well spent and will serve you for a lifetime.
 

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Lee also holds/held(some maybe expired) the most patents in the reloading world.
When you buy factory ammo, and the bullets are crimped in place. That is done with a Lee factory crimp die. If you think the high volume commercial boys would use something that didn't work, AND wasn't cheap; you are crazy.
 

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I don't know anything about anything when it comes to reloading. BUT, I just recently got into it, and, on the advice of Flash and Stretch, I bought the Lee Classic Turret press...and I'm amazed with it. I would buy another in a heartbeat. And, my .223 Rem, which was shooting 1 1/4" factory groups, is now shooting 1/4" groups, and I'm not done fine tuning the load. This was accomplished with a Lee press, Lee dies...heck, it's been Lee everything! (Lee guarantess that their collet dies will make more accurate ammunition, by the way....or your money back)

Also, in regards to you question about the priming press. Flashhole uses those things, and he likes them. I got the Lee Auto Prime, and again, I LOVE it. It gives a really nice feel of the bottom of the primer pocket, and it's quick too!
 

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Lee also holds/held(some maybe expired) the most patents in the reloading world.
When you buy factory ammo, and the bullets are crimped in place. That is done with a Lee factory crimp die. If you think the high volume commercial boys would use something that didn't work, AND wasn't cheap; you are crazy.
I wonder who invented the dies used during WWI, WWII, Korea, etc.

Jim
 

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With limited experiance with Lee products, I'd use anybodies press other then Lee.

Jim
 

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With limited experiance with Lee products, I'd use anybodies press other then Lee.

Jim
Why is that Jim? Everybody is entitled to their opinion, of course, but...with myself having such a positive experience, and you having a (seemingly) very negative experience, I am curious what it could have been?
 

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I started with an RCBS single stage press for rifle reloading and still use it after 30+ years. Last year, I bought a Lee 4-hole Turret press for my .45. I got what I paid for with the Lee and it serves my limited needs. The priming tool that's associated with the press is difficult to use (I have to slam the primer home to seat it deep enough) and the auto-index feature doesn't work but about 30% of the time. Sometimes I hand prime, but that is time consuming when trying to load any meaningful volume. Lee technicians asked me to send it in for inspection and mods if needed and I may still do that. But, at the end of the day, the Lee system does what I need it to do, despite not meeting my expectations.

I'd go with the Forster if your demands warrant it. I plan to buy a Dillon this year so I can load higher volume for my .45 and others. I will continue to use my RCBS single stage press for my rifle reloading.
 

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I wonder who invented the dies used during WWI, WWII, Korea, etc.

Jim
I think it's a reverse patent system used by someone!:rolleyes: As if the factorys, all of them haven't used some sort of crimp system. I wonder if the brits pay royalitys to lee, I have a 303 case from 1943 with the three stab marks in the case neck holding the bullet in place.

Lastly what about all the 22RF shells produced for the last hundred years or so they have a crimped in bullet don't they. Patents or no patents someone somewhere has done it long before lee was even thought of.:D
 

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I think it's a reverse patent system used by someone!:rolleyes: As if the factorys, all of them haven't used some sort of crimp system. I wonder if the brits pay royalitys to lee, I have a 303 case from 1943 with the three stab marks in the case neck holding the bullet in place.

Lastly what about all the 22RF shells produced for the last hundred years or so they have a crimped in bullet don't they. Patents or no patents someone somewhere has done it long before lee was even thought of.:D
It's not just that they are crimped, it HOW they are crimped...that's why you can get the Factory Crimp Die from Lee. And it IS a good system, which is why it's in use!
 

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I generally do not crimp any of my reloaded rounds! Only the 44 magnum rounds that go into the Model 29 and the crimping feature built into the Lyman,RCBS,C-H, and Redding die's do just fine. I don't think I need some trick system of crimping just a few rounds.
 

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docbar85,

The question you posed is misleading. Cost is a real factor.

The Forster is a very good press. The Lee Classic Cast Presses (turret and single) are both very good presses. They will both make good ammo IF You do your part. No one can touch the Lee Classic Cast presses for what you spend on them. Sure, there are presses that may be made to a tolerance one thousandth of an inch tighter, but unless EVERY factor you put into making that round has the exact same deviation, it will not matter.

Get the Lee Classic Cast Press. It will make great ammo for you providing you do your part and the money you save over buying the Forster will allow you to reload a lot more ammo.
 

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"I wonder who invented the dies used during WWI, WWII, Korea, etc."

I think someone read what was written and put a whole lot more into it than was said. Lee never claimed to have "invented" loading dies nor crimpers, nor was that what Darker said. Lee did patent some excellant innovations and that's all the man meant.


Seems the less general experience with different models of different brands of tools many have, the more certain they are that all things Lee should be avoided. Other makers love that attitude, helps them sell overpriced equipment. Lee couldn't care less, they already have a huge chunk of the market.
 

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I would get the Lee Precision Classic Turret but you really can't say it is better - it is a better deal. I use Lee Presision Turret Press but that Forster is nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
This is why I took money out of the equation, I wanted to know which is the better press not the better deal. Don't stop on this one I'm getting alot of useable infomation.
My next part will be dies.
 
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