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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I milled off the charging hump at 0 degrees. then 30, -30, -20. 20. 10. and -10/

The Weaver #45 and #46 bases are for 1898 Mausers, but the 1903 Turkish Mauser is an odd duck with a front ring higher than the rear ring by more than usual.

I drilled and tapped (4) 6-48 holes in the receiver.
To get the scope bases parallel with the receiver, I needed to mill 0.040" off the bottom of the #45 base.
That base has a concave bottom with diameter 1.050".
I clamped the base between two modified V blocks.
I milled the curved shape with a boring bar in a boring head, adjusted to cut a 1.050" hole.
How did I adjust the boring head?
I kept adjusting and cutting wood with it until it swept a 1.050" path.

It needs about 0.002" more off the #45 base, but if I polish off the facets I left on the rear ring, it should be about right.
 

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The Turk is a small ring Mauser (1.4" dia) with .125 difference between front and rear rings. Its customary to fit the front of the rear base to the clip guide and then adjust the front base for thickness to level them up, but it looks like you've gotten it done by another route.
It's also customary to trim the front receiver ring front by .125 to get rid of the overhang.
 
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I've never looked at a 1903 Turk receiver close up. Man, they have a seriously high charging hump. I did a 1938 Turk years ago when they were cheap and plentiful. I bought a 1 piece base from B-Square that had a recess cut out for the charging hump. But, it was nothing like the 1903! Looking good, keep us up to date on your progress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The elevation change with the boring bar got it to within 2 moa, but it was off 40 moa horizontally. So I broke out the cheating rings. It dialed right in.

I have a Bartlein barrel I painted Brownells Coyote color and put on a Rem700, but I over ran the drill and the chamber neck did not clean up. So the Turk Mauser small threads major diameter can digest Rem 700 hand me downs. The chamber neck looks good now.

Now I am fitting a stock I got from Midway for $33, about 20 years ago.

This is embarrassing having a great gunsmith like Belk read my amateurish posts. When he finishes a project it goes to the engraver. When I finish this, it may get some touch up paint.

Here is a picture of my final head spacing set up. If I try to do it in the lathe, sometimes I overshoot. But if I do a few twists of the wrist, with the barrel torqued on, I can get it just right.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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You made it work, and that's what matter! Congrats
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
1903 Turk Mauser pillars 20210713_103105.jpg
1903 Turk after pillar  bedding 20210713_180956.jpg

After 3 scopes and two stocks, I am now pillar bedded.
Next I will need to get a trigger to fit.
 

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The stock with the schnable forearm looks like one of the old Fajen patterns. My first stock, in the early '70's was that pattern for a 95 Mauser. I like it.
 

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tnekkc-- Having a mill and knowing how to use it puts you in the 1% club. Welcome!

The only thing I see that sets my teeth on edge is holding a M98 in the will vise. They're not square and the skirt is tapered and may times the action will squirt out of the jaws of the vise into the teeth of the end mill. Maybe you use fixtures already but in case not here's some ideas.
As you noted, the Mauser rear bridges are centerline of the bore radius on top and 30 degrees down both sides.
Top--- simple mandrel threaded for large ring M98 with accurate centers. Mostly used between bench centers which is mounted on the surface grinder.
next down- A large piece of Hex stock was milled off on the top and milled and drilled to mount an action.
1909 Peruvian with a hold down bar in it.
The bottom is another mounting block but square. The key way is for the sear lug and the end mill cut for the rear tang screw boss. I've got another with a slot for sear lug and and a clearance place for welding actions back together.
On the left is a piece of Hex stock slotted on top with set screws to hold rear scope base for Mausers. I use it on the magnetic chuck of the surface grinder.
Notice everything is surface ground flat and square. That's just another layer of precision done because I can. ;)

I've got a rather complicated fixture for surface grinding rear bridges. I can photo and describe if you like.
Locking lug recess lapping tool?

It's great to see an interest in the trade/craft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Maybe I was off 40 moa horizontally with the scope bases, because of how I fixtured the receiver to grind off the rear hump and drill and tap.
Mauser receiver jig.jpg
Jack, I cannot find the Mauser tooling I made in this 2009 pic.

Mauser tooling 20210715_045330.jpg
I can find this tooling.
Paul's223TurkDSCF0006.jpg
Here is a pic from 20 years ago of my brother who TIG welded a Turk bolt handle with JBelk photos as guide, to make a 223. He is still shooting prairie dogs with it.
 

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Amazing! That must have the webshots series I did on the old huntamerica forum. I ran across the sketch for that not long ago. Bolt handles satisfies a lot of gunsmithing skills at once-- Welding, filing, fitting, shaping, polishing and heat treating all in one small job. It can be done without electricity, too. One of the several gunsmithing projects that can.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Mill cocking piece for Wisner safety on 1903 Mauser 20210503_213606.jpg
I milled on the cocking piece so it would play well [0.030" push back on firing pin] with the Wisner safety.
grinding off rear hump of Mauser trigger and spring mod 20210714_150320.jpg
I ground on the trigger spring and the trigger hump.
Now the trigger pull is 4 pounds

Spacer in PAWS bottom metal for 260 in 1903 Turk 20210715_144012.jpg
Spacer in Mauser bottom metal for 1903 Turk 20210715_145221.jpg
1903 Turk feeding 260 dummies 2.8 in long 20210715_202513.jpg
I made spacer.
I drilled and tapped a 4-40 hole in the bottom metal to retain the spacer.
I tested with dummy 260 rounds. I feeds and ejects just fine.
 

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I'm surprised you had to mill the cocking piece. That's usually just grind a small angle job. Has the sear been replaced with a later M98 part? I'm just wondering what's different.
 

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Yes it is but the length is behind the sear lug. Where the sear engages the cocking piece is the same on all M98s. The Wisner safety is just like the M70 and acts off a vertical shaft with clearance for the cocking piece on one side and a cam that acts on the right front corner of the cocking piece when it rotates. The good news is that a standard cocking piece can replace the longer 'commercial' style. The better news is that I have a bunch of 'em in case you need to replace it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The shroud could have been drilled too far back. I did not mill these and drill these with Brownells tooling [too lazy] I got this batch from Jim Kobe in 2018.
 

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I see. I read 'Wisner safety' and assumed it was a scratch made three position, but yours is a two position made from a military shroud?
That's a different breed of cat. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I built a rifle with a Wisner and a VZ24 in 7mmRM in 2011... that the safety was lower than the trigger:( .... something you are expert about, but it confused me.

Measureing Mauser Wisner safety hold back and trigger hold back 20210506_060050.jpg
Mauser safety in 2 dimensions 20210716_173829.jpg

But this month I understand it better if I translate it to a 2 dimensional problem.
 

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The measurements are very interesting, but how do they compare to a military trigger as drawn?
Aftermarket triggers are usually designed to leave the cocking piece in exactly the same position so the military safety still works.
Three position safeties are normally .020 'behind' (towards the butt) the military safety so each cocking piece has to be fitted. Same goes for the simple Williams 45 degree lever on the right side and the same lever mounted on the left on 1951 FN actions. The ZK-47 has a safety lever low on the left side of the shroud. The FN and Brno ZK has the safety lever exactly the same as a military.
You're showing a big difference in a very simple tolerance and I can't quite get my head around it. The distance from the face of the action to the face of the sear should be within very few thousandths no matter what the trigger. Which is to say the sear position should be the same between a military direct-acting trigger and all the replacement, aftermarket, over-ride triggers. Puzzling for sure.
I used Canjar 'Improved' triggers for decades but when that supply dried up Ted Blackburn reproduced it and I've used them ever since.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Cocking piece vs Mauser trigger measurement 20210717_112419.jpg
Without taking the barrel off, I measured the cocking piece setback [crudely 5 times and took averages] and swapped out triggers to the previously known single set "gold trigger".
Mauser trigger vs weisner setback measuerments 20210717_114920.jpg
The Gold trigger NOW seems to have a different setback now with the milled cocking piece.

But the set trigger is 2# and 0.5# set, so maybe I will use that.
I do not know what brand or where I got it.
 

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At the risk of showing something you already know. I'm confused with your numbers because I've never measured in that way.

The picture shows the SEAR in the rear tang. This is a military sear, so it moves when the trigger is pulled. Commercial triggers work entirely different but the sear is usually in the same place as the military.
The SEAR SURFACE of the cocking piece rest against the sear.
The SAFETY surface is the upper corner of the cocking piece.

The critical spacing is the relationship between the sear surface and the face of the cocking piece.

My method of fitting shroud safeties is to assemble everything without springs. Measure the DIFFERENCE between the cocking piece against the sear and the cocking piece against the safety. Trim, bevel or relieve whatever is over about .020". If the safety moves the cocking piece .050 off the sear when applied, you'll need to trim about .025, but leave enough for polishing.
The way the safety cams back the cocking piece makes a big difference, too. A vertical axle M70 has very little camming action compared to some others. If the cocking piece is NOT touching the sear with the safety applied, it's safe.
 

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