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Discussion Starter #1
I've reached a point that I don't like to shoot lead bullets, It's just too hard to get all of the lead out. 3 hours work for 20 minutes of fun aint worth it. What steps do you use for cleaning and how long does it take you? Your replies and comments are most welcome. Thanks in advance!
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Shoot jacketed bullets after shooting lead. Problem solved. There is still a little bit left in the barrel but not enough to matter, in my opinion/experience.

It shouldn't take that long to clean in any case. I'd suggest a Lewis Lead Remover, now made by Hoppe's. A few passes and most of it is gone.
 

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The biggest thing to prevent leading is to make sure your bullets match your bore size and that the throats of your revolver are not smaller than the bore size. You can check for this by slugging your barrel and cylinder throats. The alloy of the bullets that you use should be tailored to the velocity at which you want to shoot them. I would invest in a "slug your barrel" kit or come up with an equivalent on your own. These kits are available from Dillon,Midway, and Brownells to name a few. Since I have done this with the revolvers that I shoot lead bullets in, I have minimal leading which is easily removed. The obvious thing is to stay away from factory lead ammunition and swaged lead bullets if you want to attain velocities over 800-1000fps. You only need to slug the barrel once and the benefits last as long as you have the gun. If your cylinder throats are undersized, it is a inexpensive matter to have it corrected by a good, reputable gunsmith. Short of this step, MikeG has got the alternative plan. Good luck.
 

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Hi:
As was said, it's easier to keep the lead out than get it out. Are these hand loads or factory loads? The old factory loads were bad. If you're handloading, and the bullet is smaller than the cylinder throats, it will lead. If your cylinder throats are smaller than the barrel bore, it will lead. If the bore is tight where the barrel screws into the frame, and loosens up front, it will lead.

Bullet hardness isn't as important, but if the bullets are too soft for heavy loads, or too hard for light loads, expect leading. Some bullet lubes just don't cut it.

The cheapest lead remover is a COPPER chore girl pot scubber. Get that cinch ring out of the middle of the chore girl, roll it out and cut off a strip about an inch wide and 3 inches long. There'll be lots of little loops of copper dropping loose, so don't do it on the living room carpet. Wrap it around an undersized barrel brush. Half a dozen passes gets most of the lead out. Use a bore brush to clean the corners of the grooves. Done in 5 minutes.

Shooters Choice Lead Remover sort of works. I put some on my brush, but I'm not sure it's worth the mess. Some folks say hydrogen peroxide cuts lead fast, but other folks say it can rust your barrel.

Bye
Jack
 

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Lead is no longer a problem since the copper pot scrubber trick. I have yet to find out how many rounds I can shoot of a load before accuracy drops off. It is a blast to blast away and not worry about how a load leads.

Family Dollar stores carry the Chore Girl brand in the south.
 

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Leading used to be a pain in the lower regions

Once I found out about lapping out the constriction where the barrel and frame join, leading became a thing of the past.
This past Sunday I shot my mod # 25-2, 45 acp/auto rim. I fired 200 or so rounds, according to my log I had fired 300-350 a couple of months ago, with just a wipe down for soot removal and rust preventive, prior to putting the revolver away. I did the same thing this Sunday and I'll do the wipe down several more times upon returning from the range before I clean the barrel and cyclinder. There's no leading, at all.
Jim
 

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Lead in Barrels

You can`t beat the copper Chore pads mentioned before.I fist read about them in Veral Smith`s book and have been using them ever since.
 

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I shoot lead in my .44 mag, my .480 Tarus and even in my 10" BFR in 450Marlin (ouch) Believe it our not MOLLY the barrell! I use KG-6. If you dont want to molly the barrell or the bullets then try Dry brushing first. I found the lead pops out simpler before I put any cleaner in.
 

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leading

The type of powder you use can also change the leading you get. IMR 4227 gives less leading but in top loads you will lose a little velocity. Using IMR 4227 with a gas check design has always worked for me in problem guns.
When I get a new gun, I polish the bore with J&B compound from Brownell's. 20 Patches run down 20 times each will smooth the bore to a mirror shine. You can also firelap which does the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Since I received all of everyones quality advice, I incorporated most of everyones suggestions, anyway I like the results and here's what I did.

Checked the size on the bore, forcing cone, chambers, they were ok. Every thing measured up ok with no big inconsistancies.

Changed powder from TiteGroup and IMR 700-X to HS-7.

Replaced brands of Lead Bullets, I'm thinking they are harder or lubed with a better lube (I know the lubes only purpose is to seal off the gases instead of making the bore slicker).

Switched from my ruger to my 657 mtn gun, since its chambers are more polished and the gun has had more rounds fired from it.

Replaced bore cleaner from Remingtons to Shooters Choice and I did buy some copper pot scrubber, but I'll save that for the Ruger.

Whatever all that was worth, I'm happy to be shooting for less again.
 
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