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Lone wolf: I'm assuming the material you are speaking of is similar to that used in Mod. 70 stainless model stocks or Ram-line stocks. So: I was told that glass bedding compounds do not make a good adhesive bond to this material.  That being the story I had to try it. I prepared the bedding surfaces by working them over with a small burr in a Dremel tool. If  the materials don't make a good chemical/adhesive bond my theory was to give the stock enough rough surface to ensure a good mechanical lock.  I've done about a dozen of them to the complete satisfaction of the owners. The compound seems to be hanging on like, well, glue and the all shoot very satisfactorily.  All the stocks had too much forend flex to suit my taste. None of them are particularly light to begin with so I made them a bit heavier yet by filling good portions of the barrel channel with aluminum  channel metal (U-shaped aluminum with about 1/8" thickness all around. This metal was also glassed in place using the mechanical lock method. Result: little forend flex and no forend slap against the barrels which were floated. I used commonly available kits, mainly Micro-Bond. None of the rifle owners complained or possibly even noticed that the stocks had gained weight but all remarked on improved performance.  stocker.
 

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Yep, two tubes of mix. I haven't tried Brownell's release agent. It's a major pain getting stuff sent here. Between our lousy dollar, freight charges and brokerage fees for me to order small quantitys is prohibitive. I'm sure I'd like it. My standby for the last 40 years has been Johnson's paste wax. I've never had a lockup using it.  It is easy to clean up and every store has it. Use modelling clay or whatever is suitable to contain the glass mix in the areas you want it.  I use galena which was used on railroads as a hotbox lubricant. It comes in sticks about an inch wide, 1/2" thick and 8 or 10 inches long.  You can shape it with a pocket knife, force it against large openings to get an imprint and then carve to shape.  I recently watched a TV programme where a couple of fellows were glassing a rifle.  Nothing plugging magazine wells or trigger and bolt slots and glass running every which way.  They gave themselves about 10 hours of cleanup work to get the holes opened and shaped again.  Use masking tape on the exterior of the stock and give it a light coat of wax too. I usually dribble a bit here and there while getting it in and its a lot easier to peel the tape off than it is to clean it out of checkering etc.  Luck and best of the season, BCstocker.
 

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Lonewolf: scratching the bluing is a no-no. Make up some pieces of hardwood in the form of small cutting spatulas for removing excess glass from along the barrel channel, action etc. . Remove the excess while the glass is still workable with the wooden tools. I suppose a guy could use brass for the same job but bits of hard maple etc. are available from scrap, cost peanuts and you don't need to clean them up. They don't leave any trace metal behind on the bluing either.Throw 'em away and whittle a new set for each job. Takes 5 minutes. If you use steel (ie: sharp chisels) you will scratch the blueing and mark the metal.  With a good coat of wax splatter on the metal flakes off with your finger nail.    BCstocker
 

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Lonewolf: Deep channels where the action lies?? Probably to reduce weight, minimize materials.Or where the barrel lies?? What about ramrod?  How would you protect the channel it lies in? Sterofoam may work well providing it doesn't break down when the bedding compound is put in. I'd test it first on a small piece of foam .  Some chemical reactions drive some types of foam wild. You could also use pieces of light wood . Sorry to be a little vague on this, I haven't seen any of the stocks (or rifles) in question. Don't know if Rem. just reworked one of their standard synthetics or came up with a new design.  If these channels are under the action  I think I would prefer something more rigid then foam coated over. BCstocker
 

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Lonewolf: There you go. There's nothing quite like taking the bull by the horns and doing the job. Hope she shoots good for you. Was just looking at your profile to see where you were from. We're a ways apart!!!. I'm just in the process of restocking a Lefever double for a friend with Claro.  One of the easiest sideXsides I've had to work on. Completed the inletting last night now for the shaping finishing and checkering.  Best of the season,BCstocker
 

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Yep. Live In Williams Lake, British Columbia.  Worked and lived here all my life (B.C.), on the coast, interior and north.  This area is called Cariboo-Chilcotin. Great trout , steelhead and salmon fishing. Local deer are in good supply, moose cariboo on limited entry now for a few years. Too much habitat encroachment, lack of forest fires has affected their habitats.  Retired now and able to spend my time hunting fishing golfing and working in my basement shop.  Usually make a couple or three one month trips each year to favorite fishing and hunting haunts.  Especially like Dragon Lake (rainbow trout to 14 lbs.), Bulkley River (steelhead), Peace river country (ducks, geese , moose, elk). That's my version of the good life. Don't travel out of province all that much. Used to go to Alberta a lot for birds but that was primarily for a change of scene and to get a long way from the work phone. Sometimes drop into Wash. to fish the rivers with a rather famous (in steelheading circles)steelheading buddy. Am contemplating looking for one of those jumbo whitetails in Saskatchewan one year but who knows.  Well, I do prattle on.  Regards, BCstocker.
 

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It sounds pretty fine and I have to assume that's a significant improvement.  I have spent little time with muzzleloaders but it looks like you're ready for b'ar.
BCstocker
 
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