Shooters Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
200 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This past week-end while deer hunting at my place in East Texas, I was still hunting the hardwoods on my property's West side. There was nothing moving and I was beginning to think that it was going to be just another evening watching the bushytails and enoying the cool breeze.
About 45 minutes before dark, a coyote howled, not too far away, several hundred yards North of my position. It only took a few seconds before that coyote was joined by another then several more. The crooning was delightful, and this was a fair bit earlier than usual for them. As they howled, I could tell that the pack was moving West. The I heard a loner start up West of me by maybe only 300 or 400 yards. It wasn't 30 seconds after that when a big buck came barreling toward me. He was obviously worried about the coyote on his back trail, because when he stopped, perhaps 80 yards past me, he was totally engrossed in looking back to see if he was being followed. He was definitely worried, but little did he know that his worries were directed at the wrong hunters.
His pause gave me the chance to line up my pr-64 Winchester 30-06 and level it at him, then slowly squeeze that 2-1/2 Lb trigger, letting a Nosler 165 grainer fly.
As they say, the rest is history.
Bob Nisbet
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,398 Posts
Congrats on the big buck. If we lay back and let nature help us sometimes things will get done without our interferance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
Congrats on the buck!

I've witnessed the same thing several times, but without the happy ending. I've had it work the other way too, deer bringing the coyotes into range.

Quite often coyotes will be shadowing antelope herds about the time the does give birth. Makes for some good hunting. The fur isn't the best but might give the youngsters a better chance at life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
930 Posts
Not as excioting, but I got a little help once. A 'yote came under my stand while I was muzzle loader hunting. Since I didn't want to waste my one shot at a yote, he got a pass. I watched him within 15 yards for a few minutes as he hunted the grass for mice. Suddenly his head jerked up and he looked intently up the powerline. I looked where he was looking, and there was a nice 8 pointer sneaking away. I never heard, and probably wouldn't have seen the buck had the yote not alerted me.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Had a coyote come up to me, in sagebrush country...stopped about 80 yards out, looked at me, looked to his right (my left) and again, again...finally I got the hint and crawled over a little rise to my left and there were deer feeding..got a shot(archery) but did not connect. Still fun.:rolleyes:

I will tell ya, when I go down the road and see horses all looking the same way.....usually game! They have told on lotsa game for me...:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I've had squirrels give away a deer's position for me in the northwoods many a time. Have seen and shot at coyotes when squirrel hunting and deer hunting, but have yet to have a yote's help in bagging a buck. But thanks for the story, now I will be watching for such in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,892 Posts
Fall 09 I was hunting at my sons.

Second day about 30 min after leagal hour. All of a sudden deer is in front and moving faster than I expected. Soon I saw the third one (doe w/ 2 fawns) pause and kinda look my way. I settled the post on her shoulder and touched off the 243 and down she went.

Since my son was only about 75 yds away, the deer was down and it was early I sat tight. I picked up the binocs after a couple min and looked at the deer. Again in another few min and then noticed a coyote about 25 yds down the trail that the deer had approached on.

I thought, got one might as well shoot another. Bang and I thought I missed. Could not see the coyote w/ binocs. I waited about 2 min and got out of the blind, laughing. My son heard me and joined me. The dog was 15 yds down the trail from the deer.

I figured out why the first deer moved thru so fast-the coyote was herding them. I saved one of them from the coyote.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
Great stories! One of my properties is 70 acres of a failed real-estate venture on the water. It feels weird to hunt on a multimillion dollar property but that's what cigar buddies are for, I guess. Anyway, the property is surrounded by successful real estate ventures up river and those darn domestic dogs think they have the right to run on my property! It just flat out ruins my mental state when I hear this one particular beagle start to howl. I keep a rabbit call with me and have called him to me several times and have had him in my cross-hairs as many times. Being shy of my well-healed neighbors, I have given him and his friends a pass. Many times when he howls, deer will get up from their beds and show themselves and when he runs a herd through the property, I get to see what kind of bucks I have. So it's a love hate relationship.

A lease I used to hunt had so many yotes, the way to lure them in was to fire a rifle and wait......then they would come looking for your deer. They even come to the sound of a bow. You got to recover your kills quickly there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
478 Posts
I live in Connecticut and the sound of Coyotes calling is becoming all to frequent. They are now starting to have a visible affect on the whitetail population. With last years heavy snows to compound problems, deer siting this season have been markedly fewer.

January 1, my hunting comrades have committed to spend some extra time in the woods and hopefully put a dent in the coyote population.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,165 Posts
Those were some good tales. Thanks guys. I like to have dogs moving through also. Sometimes it is the only chance all day to see deer. I have even jumped down form the stand to try and cut them off. It has never paid off in a kill but I have patterned deer escape routes on the property.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Glad to hear coyotes are good for something somewhere,they have become quite a problem here in Texas.Congrates on the deer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Not to leave domestic dogs out entirely, a canyon near Moab, UT was not doing particularly well back in the 70's. Good forage, reasonable muley population, but it wasn't growing. Locals put up signs asking hunters to give the place a pass so the deer population could grow.

Turns out the canyon had half doz or more homes in it and each had one or more dogs. What better thing than to let your dog run free?

I and a grad student from Utah State discovered quite a few fawn kills. All of them with domestic dog tracks tramping down the area around the kill. Only one had a coyote track passing through.

We later witnessed two domestic dogs chasing deer when we were in the middle of doe/fawn count. Strike two dogs from the ranks of deer killers. A second occasion was the student tracking a radio collared doe that was falling down in her own tracks...she was "dogged" by a dog.

Too many free ranging domestic dogs for that herd. Coyotes were there, but domestic dogs were keeping the deer population "in check".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
I once had a bobcat chase a small doe in front of me. I had my 300 Win Mag with me. I let the doe go, wondering why she was so skittish. Here comes the 'cat. The folks who invited me to hunt their place in Alabama had a side gig of tanning hides and selling them at swap meets, etc. I took care of the bobcat with the 300 Win Mag. I was careful to put the crosshairs on the front of her throat and it looked like I had sliced it with a knife. The lady of the house was much pleased with my shot, to say the least, and it was a similar good story to the OPs (except I shot the predator). Keep them coming!

Deck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
304 Posts
I too shot a coyote while did not get the deer. I was looking over a small hill and a doe cam flying across one of the runs on that slope. It was runny pretty fast so there was no way I was going to even attempt a shot. I thought that what ever it was that spooked that doe might spook something else. Well a few minutes later a coyote comes strolling by on the tracks of that deer. Not sure that is what spooked the deer because the coyote was not running flat out but I can guarantee it never got the chance to catch up with that deer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,934 Posts
About 5 years ago my sons and I was hunting some farm land along Owl Creek. I was set up in an irrigation ditch watching several doe and a late fawn. All of a sudden their heads came up, looking at the other side of the shelter belt and they bounded out of there. Several minutes later a coyote showed up sniffing around. I had a fawn distress call in my jacket so squaked it a couple times, the coyote turned and ran across the plowing straight toward me. About 40 feet out I touched off the 25-06. He looked like a big balloon with his legs sticking straight out as he hit the ground. The landowner said the state trapper just worked the place over a week before and guaranteed him there was no coyotes left in the area. No bucks in this story!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,892 Posts
Not to leave domestic dogs out entirely, a canyon near Moab, UT was not doing particularly well back in the 70's. Good forage, reasonable muley population, but it wasn't growing. Locals put up signs asking hunters to give the place a pass so the deer population could grow.

Turns out the canyon had half doz or more homes in it and each had one or more dogs. What better thing than to let your dog run free?

I and a grad student from Utah State discovered quite a few fawn kills. All of them with domestic dog tracks tramping down the area around the kill. Only one had a coyote track passing through.

We later witnessed two domestic dogs chasing deer when we were in the middle of doe/fawn count. Strike two dogs from the ranks of deer killers. A second occasion was the student tracking a radio collared doe that was falling down in her own tracks...she was "dogged" by a dog.

Too many free ranging domestic dogs for that herd. Coyotes were there, but domestic dogs were keeping the deer population "in check".

Many years ago wife and I were out and about. Passed 3 or 4 dogs along the road. As I passed I glanced over that way. At least two of em were plenty bloody, from the nose back to about the ears. The deer they harvested must have been killed just shortly before.

The dogs looked like one youd have in your house or might greet you when you came to visit.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top