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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Edit: What should you use on bolt guns? Grease or oil? I have a Remington 700 S/A 22.250Rem 24in barrel, in custom manners stock, and a timney trigger kit. Any suggestions on what I should use. Like for the bolt what should I use
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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What part of the gun? It would help to know that.......
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well I'm pretty new to shooting and yes I did go out and buy the crazy cool beded stock even though I'm fairly new but I used a factory varment rifle from Remington I'm just not sure what should be used on the bolt area and the trigger group I want my parts to last longer than me of course.
 

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Well I'm pretty new to shooting and yes I did go out and buy the crazy cool beded stock even though I'm fairly new but I used a factory varment rifle from Remington I'm just not sure what should be used on the bolt area and the trigger group I want my parts to last longer than me of course.
Welcome to the forum.

You'll find lots of personal opinions and choices when it comes to gun oils. I typically prefer a spray can and cloth. Spray a bit of my Royal Purple gun oil on a chosen rag and wipe what needs to be lubed or protected. As for your bolt and bolt guides, it's best to remove the bolt and I do just as I mentioned; oily rag all over the bolt and on the back and sides of the locking lugs. A Q-tip with oil can be helpful in lubing the bolt rails in the receiver area. For barrel cleaning, I like to use a Bore Snake and you can follow that up with a lightly oiled patch if you want. I'm of the sort that doesn't feel that a bore needs cleaning every time you shoot. Again, my personal preferences.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That helps so much I just screen shot your reply for reference ty ty ty sorry if I didn't provide enough info I try not to be a bother on these forms let the real shooters talk and I'll just read haha
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Welcome,

Don't over-think it. Even with zero lubrication, unless something was badly machined originally; the parts will outlast you anyway. Honestly if they don't, replacements are a dime a dozen at the local drugstore.:)

For my dust here(lots of volcanic ash) lubrication needs to be sparse, or it attracts the gritty stuff. I pull bolts completely apart and degrease things. Then like TN says, LIGHTLY, cover the surfaces with some form of oil. Gun lubricants are for the most part simply borrowed from another industry(usually automotive). So for the loads encountered(such as the locking lugs), anything automotive or industrial is so far overkill, as to be comical. So again, don't over think it.

Cheers
 
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Get half an old cotton sock, well washed and dip it in enough auto transmission oil to barely leave a trace on glass. Wipe down the gun inside and out with that rag and then apply any good grease with the tip of a toothpick to the rear of the sear, the cocking ramp and the extractor cam. The left-overs from that one dab of toothpick grease goes on the back of the locking lugs.
 

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This video is the same thing I did in my benchrest days back in the 1980's, plus a light lube on the bolt body. I still have the syringe in my cleaning box, it was a red high pressure lube.


 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Please don't use ATF, it has sulphur in it and even the innards of an automatic transmission will rust as can be seen on this forward clutch hub from a Ford C6.



A tiny dab of molybdenum grease on the back of the bolt lugs and a Q tip with Shooters Choice gun oil on the bolt raceway is all that's needed. Don't lube the trigger.

RJ
 
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Any gun oil or quality CLP and used sparingly will be sufficient. Cotton rag and Q tips work fine.
Saw a You tube video the other day and the guy used more oil and CLP in 10 min than I've used in the last 5 yrs.
 

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Please don't use ATF, it has sulphur in it and even the innards of an automatic transmission will rust as can be seen on this forward clutch hub from a Ford C6.


RJ
RJ, I'm not at all doubting what you are saying, which makes me find it very interesting that one of the components in Ed's Red (developed/modernized by Ed Harris) is ATF (Dextron III)! Ed's Red is considered [by many] to be a very good bore cleaner/solvent.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Ed's Red is considered [by many] to be a very good bore cleaner/solvent.
Yes, a cleaner/solvent. Dawn dish soap is also a good cleaner/degreaser, that doesn't inherently mean it's a phenomenal rust preventer.;)
ER also has lanolin and diesel in it, so it isn't the same animal as just using straight ATF for rust/corrosion prevention.

I'm actually currently running a test on a couple different firearms, using straight Lanolin for lubrication/rust prevention. It's been used as a rust preventer for ages, so really it's more about testing out it's lubricant properties in a firearm setting.

Cheers
 

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Yes, a cleaner/solvent. Dawn dish soap is also a good cleaner/degreaser, that doesn't inherently mean it's a phenomenal rust preventer.;)
ER also has lanolin and diesel in it, so it isn't the same animal as just using straight ATF for rust/corrosion prevention.

I'm actually currently running a test on a couple different firearms, using straight Lanolin for lubrication/rust prevention. It's been used as a rust preventer for ages, so really it's more about testing out it's lubricant properties in a firearm setting.
Cheers
Looking at Ed's writeup, he does say it is a good preservative and rust inhibitor for up to one year, and two years with the addition of Lanolin (which he lists as an 'optional' ingredient that also helps protect your hands).
I'm betting that your experiments with anhydrous Lanolin will mirror mine as relates to high pressure lubrication. I came onto it in the 1980's when I started making my own jacketed benchrest bullets in 30 and 7mm calibers. I found it to be one of the best high pressure lubes available. A STLBR Club friend by the name of Guy Chism started making and selling a line of 30 cal. benchrest bullets (mainly 150 grain in the beginning) to the hunter class benchrest community that he dubbed "10X" bullets as a nod to the scoring method of that class (the 10X bullets are still available from the some guys up north that bought Guy's dies and right to the name). His dies were carbide and he developed his own lube using STP and a thinner (I forget what it was). Guy was my 'bullet making mentor' and showed me the ropes when I was starting. While I used his lube at first, my dies were steel, not carbide, which require a higher level of lube performance than does carbide. I started experimenting and quickly found that none (any!) of the available case sizing lubes were up to the challenges of bullet making, they simply don't work. I hit upon pure anhydrous Lanolin (meaning single ingredient, no formula mix), finding it performed, at least in my steel dies, better than Guy's mix. When I reported that to Guy, he asked me for a small sample to try. I had bought a pint (as I recall) and still have almost all of it today, it doesn't take much! He tried it, and found it was better in his carbide dies also, and switched over from then until he passed away. It's amazing how little is required, or wanted, on the bullet jackets. Too much and you get wrinkling in either/both the core seating and point up dies, similar to what you get on case shoulders in the sizing die from too much lube. To show you how little was required, my method of lubing the jackets was a 'one time shot' prior to core seating with the residual amount left on for the point up step. I would take a small square of wax paper (say 3" x 3") and zero my powder scale for that tare weight. I then put a few grains (forget now, but around 20 something?) of Lanolin on the wax paper. The wax paper served simply as something to hold onto as I evenly 'wiped' the Lanolin onto the entire inner surface of a 1/2 gallon Tuperware container (with lid). I would then add several hundred virgin bullet jackets to the container and begin gently agitating/tumbling the container by hand, simulating a rotating 'rock tumbler/case polisher of sorts. The jackets picked up the minimal amount of lube that came from contacting the inside of the container and what was 'shared' from one jacket to another from contact. Indeed a very small amount, but worked perfectly. After the point up step the finished bullets were put in a bath towel where I would hold an end in each hand and do a 'shoe shine' routine where the bullets would rub against the towel and themselves, which would both remove the lube and polish them to a bright shiny finish. I later acquired a set of 7mm steel Corbin dies and a set of 7mm carbide dies, and found equal success in those with the Lanolin lube.
I'll be interested in hearing your test procedures and results.
 

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Any gun oil or quality CLP and used sparingly will be sufficient. Cotton rag and Q tips work fine.
Saw a You tube video the other day and the guy used more oil and CLP in 10 min than I've used in the last 5 yrs.
Oil in the barrel will result in stock turning black right at the receiver. Few drops everytime you clean it and then stand it in closet/safe and son the stock is wet.

On the metal parts I use RIG (Rust Inhibiting Grease) appled generosly to all parts that you dont want to rust from all causes esp fingerprints. Dont forget under the stock occasionally, esp if it was raining last time you hunted (ducks?).
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Dont forget under the stock occasionally, esp if it was raining last time you hunted (ducks?).
I'm going to go out on a limb here, and say he's Not hunting ducks with his Remington 700, in 22-250...;):LOL:
 

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I love everything about Ed's red except how to store it, one of the guys on this forum suggested using a small gas can, it melted the lid and spout. Finally found a one gallon metal turpintine can to put it in. And I put lanolin in it,makes all the difference in lasting protection of the metal. You can get all the ingredients at home depot except the lanolin,got it from Amazon. Recipe is on youtube. I would grease the back of the locking lugs with automotive moly lube,a full size tube will last a lifetime.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Recipe is on YouTube??
The recipe is in at least two different stickies here, one such sticky being immediately above this post....

Curious about the gas can. I've been storing it in a 'plastic' gas can for years with no issues.
 

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If in dusty conditions, as little oil as possible if not dry since oil will collect dust and powder residue. Otherwise, lightly oil. I would not use grease. There are a multitude of opinions for what type of oil to use on firearms. Not meaning to impugn other opinions, but advance from someone whose been shooting and building firearms for decades longer than I have in active in shooting sports, when asked about what gun oil to use replied, "Whatever I can pickup at Shot Show for free. Stock up every year." Specialized firearms may need something special to ensure proper function under extreme conditions, i.e., full auto, and/or crew serviced military weapons. Most of us can get along fine with virtually any quality oil. One friend decades ago said he bought a can of Mobile 1, and plans on using it until he dies or quits shooting and doubts he will ever empty it.
 
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