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Get half an old cotton sock, well washed and dip it in enough auto transmission oil to barely leave a trace on glass. Wipe down the gun inside and out with that rag and then apply any good grease with the tip of a toothpick to the rear of the sear, the cocking ramp and the extractor cam. The left-overs from that one dab of toothpick grease goes on the back of the locking lugs.
I agree with you. That advice is especially true if the rifle has a stainless action and bolt. Oil, in my opinion, is not sufficient for SS when it comes to the bolt. Stainless is softer than carbon steel and locking lugs need a good quality grease on them to keep from galling when the bolt is opened and closed. Not much but sufficient to keep them lubricated when hot. I have used so many different types of oil on rifles over the decades I lost track. Virtually all worked satisfactorily. My bolt action varmint rifles are a combination of either Rem 700 actions or SS Batt actions and I have never used anything other than a light dab of Lubriplate grease on the bolts and they all are just fine after thousands of rounds on some of them. I remember way back my dad, who was a master machinist, told me that if it slides, put grease on it and oil on the rest and I never forgot it. Oddly though, when I was in the Army we used to dump motor oil on the bolt in our M85 and M2 50 cal's in our tanks to keep them firing. Some folks did the same in the 7.62 coax as well. Worked fine but made a big mess.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Stainless can be as hard or soft as you want to heat-treat it. It is, however, more prone to galling (regardless of hardness) than carbon steel. So a dab of any kind of grease on the lugs and cocking cam(s) isn't a bad idea, at all.
 

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When Pappy retired from hunting and gave me his 20ga. it came with a tiny tube of luberplate. Dad used 'just a bit' of the same on the tube of his sweet 16 too.

Weapon Shield has working products.
 

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When Pappy retired from hunting and gave me his 20ga. it came with a tiny tube of luberplate. Dad used 'just a bit' of the same on the tube of his sweet 16 too.
I have always understood that the friction ring/tube on A5's and Remington 11's should not be lubricated, per se, as they require the designed in friction to function properly. Less friction allows the barrel to move rearward with greater speed/force and kinda 'hammers' the whole getup. If you oil the tube for corrosion prevention, wipe off as much as possible before shooting. That's what I always did on a Rem. 11 and a Franchi recoil auto. Anyone know otherwise?
 

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The OEM grease on factory A-5s was common vaseline. It works but it draws dust just like the rest. The first boundary layer lubes with teflon made them too slick and broke guns.
 

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Here is a pretty good read on the A5, and clones. More different friction ring 'settings' than I imagined. TFB Armorer’s Bench: Understanding Auto-5 Friction Ring Orientation

The Cutts Compensator setting is interesting. I have had an old Rem. 11 for about 15 years that has a Cutts Comp., that I have never fired or taken apart. Might have to pull the forearm and have a look or, better yet, take it out and shoot it to see how it functions. Might want to clean it first, might be 'gummed up' a bit without being fired for about 40 years.

Here is a good exchange of 'opposing views' on the lube subject: Whats the best lube for A5

While all this is still on the overall subject of lubing firearms, I apologize if it is taking it too far away from the Rem. 700 question.
 

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Crooked Creek,
Thank you for those 2 links. My personal experience is w/my grampa's Rem11. I thoroughly cleaned it every time I shot it, BUT as a young man I thought WD-40 was the cat's meow. WRONG!!!

At the end after a day hunting & maybe ½ box of shells it locked up, scored the mag tube up so bad the bronze ring was stuck & it wouldn't return to battery. A trip to a "gunsmith" (part of the family) got me a barrel that he melted the silver soldered lug off & the reattached w/brazing. Claimed the lug was bent & rubbed the tube. (I'm not trusting that barrel/lug!) Which didn't make sense to me cause there wasn't any rub marks on the id of the lug & the tube was scored almost all the way around. WD-40 in my older wiser more experienced mind is about equal to running dry. I would not do it!!

I still have Grandfather's gun, a couple of barrels off Gun Broker, & a new to me mag tube from Numrich. Now to gather courage & install the parts. 🤪🤯 I also need to make & use the tool JBelk showed me to true up the inside of the forearm wood & install reinforcing, as well as the fiber shock absorbing washer in the receiver. This winter. Hey, it's only been 50 years!!
 

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If in dusty conditions, as little oil as possible if not dry since oil will collect dust and powder residue. Otherwise, lightly oil. I would not use grease. There are a multitude of opinions for what type of oil to use on firearms. Not meaning to impugn other opinions, but advance from someone whose been shooting and building firearms for decades longer than I have in active in shooting sports, when asked about what gun oil to use replied, "Whatever I can pickup at Shot Show for free. Stock up every year." Specialized firearms may need something special to ensure proper function under extreme conditions, i.e., full auto, and/or crew serviced military weapons. Most of us can get along fine with virtually any quality oil. One friend decades ago said he bought a can of Mobile 1, and plans on using it until he dies or quits shooting and doubts he will ever empty it.
I filled a plastic squeeze bottle ( old dishwasher soap bottle ) with full synthetic motor oil around 1977-78. I am still using it and have hardly put a dent in the level. I have an old sock-half and some cotton patches I keep in a plastic bag that I have been using since that time. If needed ( usually not needed ) I will put a drop or two on the sock from my squeeze bottle and wipe down all exposed metal and the bore leaving the barest trace of the synthetic oil behind. If you can run a clean finger on the metal and feel it, you've used WAY too much!

On metal action parts that rub against each other I will put the barest trace of Tetra gun grease, wait a moment and wipe off. Tetra will leave a thin, dry, waxy residue that does not attract gunk. I also use Tetra on my 1911 rails.

None of my guns has ever picked up a spot of rust. Good luck, my friend!
 
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