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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
About 6 months ago I picked up a Remington Model 11 Sportsman with 28" solid rib barrel. Found it in a "gunsmith special" bin for $150. It was covered in grease and really ugly. I decided I'd pay that for the barrel, so I bought it. Cleand it up and there was a downright decent gun under all that gunk. Opened the choke up to SK1, and took it out to the Trap range yesterday.

Shot four rounds, and it went. 24, 22, 24 ,23...She shoots great!!

It's the gun in the middle, not bad for $150

Wood Air gun Trigger Material property Wood stain
 

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Good score! Good scores! I have an A-5 Light Twelve from 1978 that is a real favorite of mine. I was really into shotguns 20-25 yrs ago when I did a lot of upland hunting and a bit of skeet and I owned a LOT of nice shotguns. An old Parker, Win M23 and lots more. But, the shotgun I always seemed to shoot the best was that A-5.

At one time I thought that "hump" was UGLY! But after shooting one...I loved it.

Enjoy that fine old gun!! (y)
 

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Congratulations! I bought new 20ga A5 a long time ago because I love the way they look and feel, never could get good with it unfortunately, they have to much drop on the comb for my build. I sold it to my cousin who is 6'2" with a long neck, he's absolutely deadly with it on pheasant and quail.
 

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Nice set of 'humpbacks', and a great pick up on the Rem 11 for $150!!
I've owned two Rem. Model 11's, one when I was in my teens (my first semi-auto) and I still have one I picked up from a co-worker about 15 years ago, that had been his dad's. That one had it's plain barrel shortened with the addition of a ventilated adjustable choke 'Cutt's Compensator'. Kind of a nostalgic classic look from the add pages of the gun magazines of the 40's and 50's. I kinda like the unique feel of the 'double shuffle' recoiling barrel of the humpbacks.
 

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Always liked the A 5's and have 2 of them One in a 12 ga magnum and a light 20. I've had the 12 for about 45 yrs now.
Only mark on it is a crease down the butt stock from a GSP I had that jumped up and put a claw mark on it after bringing back a pheasant I'd shot. The mark would steam out but I know where it came from and think about that when I handle it.
 

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My father was stationed in Germany in the early 60's, he bought a Sweet 16 at the bx and brought it home, my nephew has it NIB to this day. I don't recall exactly what he paid for it but it was ridiculously inexpensive back then with the military discount.
 

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The price of a Sweet Sixteen at the Walker Hill UN complex south of Seoul in 1965 was $93.40. My dad shot a M11 Rem. and I wanted to buy a matching A-5, but that would have taken half a month's pay and I was too far away up north to put it on lay-a-way. They were $168.50 retail in 1969. Still a great bargain.
 
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Shot my first rabbit, deer and one of my biggest bucks with a Belgium made Sweet 16 A5. Still have it and the rifle sight slug barrel but don’t use it very much anymore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I fell in love with the A5 as a kid. My hunting buddy had one, and it really made my J.C. Higgins Model 20 look bad (actually, that was a very good pump gun). I really had gun envy because his A5 was just so cool.
Then later in life I learned about the engineering challenges JMB faced when designing the A5, and then I REALLY became impressed with the A5. Let's see how your gas gun works when you dump black powder rounds in there. When JMB designed the A5 shotgun ammo was going through a lot of changes. Black powder, smokeless, Shultz, etc. When you don't know which type of propellant is going to be used suddenly long recoil becomes a very attractive solution. That long recoil system makes sure very little powder residue ever makes it inside the receiver.
 

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The Remington model 11/Browning A5 are the only shotguns I have found that have enough drop @ the comb to allow me to sight down the barrel properly. I love them! Hitting the willy skeet is SO much easier if you naturally look down the barrel!

Been doing a bit of collecting of the old safety inside the trigger guard models as that was what my grandfather gave me when I got old enough to hunt w/my dad & uncles. I tried to then new 1100 when they came out, had to whittle down the comb to be able to hit squat!
 

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What a wonderful find Dark Lord. Although I have never owned any of the 11's or A5's, I have always been impressed by their look and feel.

The Remington model 11/Browning A5 are the only shotguns I have found that have enough drop @ the comb to allow me to sight down the barrel properly. I love them! Hitting the willy skeet is SO much easier if you naturally look down the barrel!

Been doing a bit of collecting of the old safety inside the trigger guard models as that was what my grandfather gave me when I got old enough to hunt w/my dad & uncles. I tried to then new 1100 when they came out, had to whittle down the comb to be able to hit squat!
I also have the issue with not enough drop at the comb. If you can find any of these to shoot, you might give them a try. I have found that the older Remington 1100's and 870's have more drop at the comb than most. As far as OU's the Winchester Model 96, Nikko Golden Eagles and Browning Citori Feather Superlight (English style stock), all have the proper drop in the comb to suit me.

Nothing is worse than an improper fit in shotguns.

Good luck and all the best.
 

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Insufficient drop at the comb is pretty easy to fix.
Not as easy as you would think when looking for stock firearms. I despise the robotic looking stocks that many skeet and trap shooters have nowadays and I would also never shave a comb and make it look terrible. It is a personal preference on my end and if you looked at any of the photos of guns that I own, you will see that "wood" is what I like. Many of the rifles that I own were custom made for my Dad (who thankfully was built a lot like me). Most of the others rifles and shotguns (shotgun junkie) are ones that fit me or I bought stocks that helped fit me better. I only own one Synthetic stock (17 HMR) and would gladly trade it for a wood stock any day. I do like laminates though... :D

I will probably never shoot a 249 in Skeet (maybe not even a 100 straight) anymore, but I did at one time, with stocks that fit and weren't altered. To each his own.

You love the original A5/R11 and I like stock guns that fit.

Good luck and all the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
If you refuse to modify a stock, then yeah; it will be challenging to find the perfect fit. I'm a gunsmith, so clearly I'm not afraid of taking a rasp to my stock if that's what it needs. And if you do it right, no one can tell. If you do it wrong though, it looks like ***.
 

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Word of caution! Never ever shoot a humpback using your left eye while shooting right handed! Nose blood isn't good for gun finishes! Yeah, it hurt.
 
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