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How important is it to use a torque wrench when tightening gaurd screws on a .270? ive always just tightened them with a regular screw driver. I know there are specifications to what lb. you're suppose to tighten them to but i don't have a torque wrench.

Thanks, Jim
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Didn't have a torque wrench for years and merely tightened with a screw driver or allen wrench as you. After purchasing a torque wrench, can't really tell much difference between it and the old method, if done properly. Torque instructions tell you a wooden stocked receiver needs 55 lbs of torque while a synthetic or tactical needs 60 lbs. If you tighten to firm, but not squeaky, contact you should be fine.

Always tighten the front screw first to resistance, the rear screw to same and then complete the front and then the back. Front should have a slight bit more torque than the rear. I usually bump the recoil padded rifle on a carpeted floor sorta firmly and then check the screws again. This helps settle the action in the stock better.
 

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Jim, in 40 plus years I've never used a torque wrench either. That having been said, the point of using one is to tighten the action to the stock with a known unchanging degree of tension. This eliminates one variable in trying to develop that perfect accuracy that many of us try for. Goatwhiskers the Elder
 

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The same every time makes more sence to me than any number. "Your hand" might be better than a torque wrench on "your rifle"!

Rifle makers view carries a lot of weight. Rifle owners view carries more weight! You own it.

Cheezywan
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Ken's advice is as good as any. Nothing wrong with using a torque wrench, but I've done it by hand for years. No problems yet.
 

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http://www.portlandbolt.com/technicalinformation/bolt-torque-chart.html

I would first look at the bolt diameter, then check the torque wrench then determine if I needed an 'inch pound wrench' of a 'foot pound wrench', the difference? 50 ft pounds is 600 inch pounds, 4 ft lbs = 48 inch pounds.

Weight times distance = foot pounds of torque - 4lbs (W) X 1 ft (D)= 4 ft lbs or 48 inch pounds of torque

"Torque instructions tell you a wooden stocked receiver needs 55 lbs of torque while a synthetic or tactical needs 60 lbs"

F. Guffey
 

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If it was possible to torque the nuts on a rod bearings with your bare hands it would sound correct, the torque on a 3/8" to 5/16' bolt/nut is from 35 to 45 foot pounds, for most this requires leverage as in a brake over, box end wrench. or ratchet, even with a glove it would be near impossible to turn a straight handle nut driver to those specifications. That is the part that did not sound correct to me.

There are different types of feet and foots, I believe the Winchester would come under a variation of 'foot' as in 'FOOT NOTE' according to the manufactures,*Winchester is different.

*foot note: Torque Winchester guard screws to a half a foot pound (6 inch pounds) of torque and snug the center screw.

F. Guffey
 

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Most torque wrenches bigger than 1/4" drive start at 10 ft/lbs. The 1/4" drive torque wrenches start in the inch/lb range. Grade three 1/4" bolts (no hash marks on head) have limit of about 5 ft/lbs maximum torque. Guard screws on most rifles are smaller than 1/4" although many newer manufactured rifles are using common off the shelf hardward (cheaper).
 

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I just split the fore-end of my stock in half and still can't get it torqued down to 55ft lbs...maybe I should have read the entire thread first? :eek:
 
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