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Englander,

If it is marked XTR it is probably a pre-safety rifle. XTR stood for extra, or something to that effect. It meant that the wood was checkered. These early rifles had a little nicer wood thatn the later examples.
The pre-safties still have the rebounding hammer. Now that we know that we can swap out the lower tangs, if the rebounding hammer bothers you there is a fix.

The .356 is a serious rifle that will meet your velocity and muzzle energy laws. They are all 20" barrels. For your larger Roe deer the Speer 220 gr. jacketed FN is probably the best starting point. Strongly built and good ballistic coeficient. The RCBS 200 gr GC cast bullet is another good starting point. For smaller stuff the Hornady and Sierra 200 gr RN bullets are fine.

If this is an early rifle the rear scope mount holes are drilled at an angle and the current Williams reciever sight will not work. Winchester changed this pretty quickly but check before you purchase scope mounts or receiver sights. The monte-carlo stock of the early big bore rifles are ugly but they handle recoil well.

If you mount a scope I suggest Weaver bases and Millett Angle Loc rings, they handle recoil very well.

The Speer #13 reloading manual has a good cross section of loading information to get you started along with free stuff from winchester.

You can make your brass from .444 Marlin brass. Use a Redding form/trim die, worth whatever it costs to get one over the deep water.

If I sound like a .356 booster, I am! Not a lot of jacketed bullets available but those that are available are good ones. RCBS and NEI have you covered with molds. Nothing currently available from Lyman is worth messing with.

Pistol bullets, both cast and jacketed work very well in this caliber/rifle. The Lyman 200 gr. RN for the Super Police .38"s or the .38-200 feeds well in this rifle for reduced loads.

I could go on and on....
 

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Englander,

Sure do!
I like the Weaver bases, they are not pretty and they stand up a little higher than others but they handle recoil well.
They only thing to watch for on the early big bore angle ejects is if the rear base is angle drilled. The Williams sight wont fit.
 

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ENGLANDER

You cannot make .356 from .303 Britsh. You CAN make the .307 and .356 from .444 Marlin. The easiest way to do it is with the Redding form/trim die. These dies are smooth on the inside and make the process easy. You can do it in intemediate steps but it is harder. I have found brass life of reformed .444's to be slightly shorter. Probably because I did not anneal the necks.
The reformed brass accepted any load I had tried with standard Winchester brass. Graff & Sons also has .307 and .356 brass.

Remember that with your velocity limit of 2450 fps and 1400 ftlbs of muzzle energy (is that correct?)  you will have to use maximum loads with the .444 and .356. The short barreled .444 Outfitter will probably  not "prove up" with bullets heavier than 250 grains. The .356 with 20" barrel with make the cut with a 220 Speer using a maximum load. Everyone has to live with silly rules, but you have a tough one!
 
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