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Hi All,

Just scored myself a mint condition 2002 JM Marlin 1894 in 357 which I plan to keep forever.

I am purchasing a new safe and stumbled across an article https://www.secureitgunstorage.com/gun-safe-corrosion/ which talks about carpet in safes accelerating corrosion from the formaldehyde in the adhesive. :confused:

Imagine this isn't really problem in Australia as pretty dry over here.

Has anyone here ever had sad experience of opening safe to see there loved items corroded ?

I've only ever stored hand guns which were never left in safe longer than 8 weeks at a time and haven't had problem before.

I was thinking of getting the carpet lined Lokaway safe for my JM (Would be the first carpet lined safe I've had)

Cheers, Jeff
 

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Don't know about "already lined" safes, but would suggest they will be OK. I lined all my safes with carpet and have had NO problem after about 10 years! There are a couple of things in my situation that could go either way. One is I am in the SW and generally damp, but the other thing is my safes are not the normal "tin" things they are Chubb safes and fire proof which will keep temps fairly constant which may help??
 

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I lined all my safes with carpet and have had NO problem after about 10 years!
Thanks for reply, was hoping to hear that, will get the carpet lined lokaway.

Think the article talking about accelerated corrosion was going to extremes, would be minor factor compared to other contributing variables in average gun safe environment.:)
 

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I've got a carpeted safe and some of the guns in it have been there for over forty years now. No rust, not even a spec, on any of them. I always wipe them down when being stored with a silicon cloth to get my finger/hand prints off them. There's more corrosion in your hands than you'd believe.
About everyone I know who's gotten rust on their guns have either put them away wet, or keep them in a safe in the basement where it's very damp. Keeping them dry is the best thing you can do for them.
 

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I've got a carpeted safe and some of the guns in it have been there for over forty years now. No rust, not even a spec, on any of them. I always wipe them down when being stored with a silicon cloth to get my finger/hand prints off them. There's more corrosion in your hands than you'd believe.
About everyone I know who's gotten rust on their guns have either put them away wet, or keep them in a safe in the basement where it's very damp. Keeping them dry is the best thing you can do for them.
Excellent, thanks for info on finger prints also, Ill be getting some silicon cloth.

That explains person in gun shop saying I don't want to touch any of the metal when he opened box for another gun I purchased 21 years old but new in box.

Wish I had more money - there is a Marlin 39A made in 1985 new in the box for sale at Jerrys gun shop in USA at moment but costs about $1300 to import into Australia plus the purchase price.

One power ball :D
 

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I think you will find that humidity, temperature and dew point are the main issues when storing guns.

If the air gets cold enough, it can't hold the water and it falls out of the air and deposits on your guns. This is the dew point. If there is high relative humidity 80% then the dew point will be high. Example Water condenses on guns at 24 degrees C. If the humidity was say 20%, the dew point might be 9 degree C.

If you can remove the humidity, you can have a very cold gun safe and not risk rusting you guns. You can remove the humidity using Zeolite or 3A molecular sieve pellets. You need to keep the door shut and not open it or you need to change the pellets. (The 3A molecular sieve pellets you can reuse by sticking them in the oven at 280 degrees for an hour or two. They work a lot better than desiccant pellets that gun shops sell or that you can buy on ebay.)

The other way to stop water condensing on your guns is to raise the temperature in the gun safe. In cold climates they use low voltage heating elements in guns safes to warm the air which raised the dew point and keeps your guns cozy warm and dry :)

The only way to be 100% safe is to get a data logger with humidity - Temperature and Dew point recorded over time. I bought one to see how well the molecular sieve worked to remove humidity

The heating rod might be the most practical method. Doesn't use much electricity. Probably not needed in Australia, except if you live in VIC or TAS during winter.

The volatiles given off by new carpet could well be of concern. It depends on what god awful smelly Chinese carpet chemicals they used in the manufacture process. Acetyl Aldehyde and other volatiles given off and mixed with condensed water vapour could well cause a ph change in the condensed water. droplets on your rifle. You wouldn't want acidic water droplets on your nice new rifle eating holes? Leave the carpet out of the safe for 12 months, then put it back if you are worried. Probably only an issue for museums with historic metal objects to keep safe for decades. Unless you have a $100,000 22LR, I'd not worry. Get a low wattage heating element instead.





Why do new cars smell? Because of the volatile vapours given off by the new materials.
 
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