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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Richards Microfit stock that I am presently working on has the While Line at the fore-end Rosewood cap and the Rosewood Grip cap. My problem is that after I started sanding this stock the White Line has become discolored in spots and I cannot seem to remove this. Anyone with suggestions? I have tried sanding in just the direction of the Rosewood and also sanding and wiping with fresh Tru Oil to no avail!
 

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You say that it happened after you "started sanding". What grit sandpaper are you on now? You may be seeing some of the rosewood dust being imbedded in the sanding grooves (scratches) in the plastic white line spacers. If that is what it is, it may correct itself as you progress to finer grit paper. You may have to go to a 400 (or finer) grit, at least where the wood meets the plastic spacer. I'd also try some alcohol on a rag to see it that would lift the sanding dust out of the scratches in the plastic. I would not apply any oil finish (Tru Oil or?) until you are completely finished with the sanding. Just some thoughts.
 

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Wipe it with acetone. Acetone also helps make Tru Oil stick to oily woods like Rosewood.
Be careful sanding different woods that are stuck together. Use a sanding block so you don't get ripples due to differences in hardness.
 

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Wipe it with acetone. Acetone also helps make Tru Oil stick to oily woods like Rosewood.
Be careful sanding different woods that are stuck together. Use a sanding block so you don't get ripples due to differences in hardness.
I've had some bad experiences, in years past, with strong solvents on plastic spacers where the surface of the plastic has started to slightly dissolve (or 'melt'). When that has happened, I've hand to sand even more to get the plastic spacers back to a smooth surface. Acetone is a great finger nail polish remover for the same reason. I guess it may depend on the composition of the plastic used by the stock maker, but I think it may present a risk where there is a plastic component between the wood parts. If you're (the OP) going to use acetone, I'd get it on and off very quickly.
Agree, sanding blocks are wise where dissimilar woods are used....been there!

P.S. to KMW1954: Tru Oil does have an amber color to it that will give a 'yellowing effect' to the white line spacers, more so as you build up additional coats.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well in my inexperience I have already started to apply the Tru Oil. 3 applications, 2 that were reduced to 2 parts mineral spirits to 1 part Tru Oil and today one application of reduced 1 to 1 parts. Applied wet and heavy and then wet sanded with 220 paper. This is from today.

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes a sanding block was used at all times until I started the wet sanding and that is being done with very light pressure
 

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You know, when I look at your photos and zoom in on the spacers, it looks like 'wood grain', if not scratches in plastic. I assumed (my bad!) that your reference to 'White Line' was that the material was plastic. Is it plastic or a light colored wood, like maple? If it's not wood grain, then I'd say you still have scratches in the plastic. If it is three different woods, then use the acetone to lift the darker (rosewood or walnut) dust out of the grain of the light wood. To do so, you will have to remove all of the Tru Oil finish to get back to wood. Otherwise, the finish will block and prevent the lifting effect of either alcohol or acetone.
 

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Just looked at the Richards website, and sure enough, the 'White Line' spacers are maple wood. You have dark sanding dust embedded in the maple wood grain pores. Go back to post #7 and start sanding back down to bare wood to get rid of all the Tru Oil out of the maple pores. Then, lift the dust out with the solvent of your choice, including plain old water.
BTW, the reason your statement that it is "discolored in spots" is simply the fact that the wood has pores and grain that runs in different directions (because it's 'natural material'). Look at the grip cap spacer (zoomed in), the front and rear has 'pin hole' pores (end grain) whereas the sides have linear streaks (side grain) so, trying to sand the 'spots' out in any one direction will prove futile.
Also, regardless of what you do, you may inevitably still be able to detect the pores due to the amber color of your finish. But, that's not all bad, IMO, since seeing that the spacers are real wood, and not plastic, is pretty 'classy'!

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sorry, had to run into town quickly.

Yes from what I understand the White Line is Maple wood. So I will stop for now and will try cleaning it with acetone and a Q-tip. Then the question for me becomes how do I keep out the mixed dust from sanding from infiltrating the maple again?
 

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There is no way to keep dust out of maple. Dogwood or Holly is usually the white wood and much more dense than maple. All three are 'white', though. THe walnut will not stain as bad as the rosewood.
Thinned finish, sanded in is my preferred method, but I let the thinned finish dry for a week before the first sanded in coat. No matter, both works and makes a great finish.
FWIW-- Tru-Oil and real (phenolic) Spar Varnish could come from the same can, but the price is much different. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
FWIW-- Tru-Oil and real (phenolic) Spar Varnish could come from the same can, but the price is much different. ;)
Back before my heart bypass I use to flip fishing boats and replaced many transoms and decks. Would use a mixture of Spar varnish, mineral spirits and boiled linseed oil to seal the wood. Worked very well and would soak in nicely. just wouldn't finely sand it to get a gloss finish.

So after posting the pictures the pictures look much more clear than the real thing. So maybe it is not as bad as I think!.
 
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That's probably holly, not plastic. Holly will darken with true oil. Holly is better than plastics as it forms a better bond of the two different woods than plastic.

RJ
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
As crooked creek stated @ post 8 and that I looked up again the White Line spacer is made of Maple.

While waiting for dinner I took a small piece of 220 sandpaper and rolled it into a narrow stick and then sanded just the maple piece all the way around and was able to remove most of the discoloration. Yet to go over it with any acetone.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Most certainly will post photos. Especially after all this!
 
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Just be aware that the dowel and paper trick cut a ditch in the maple that has to be removed by more sanding above and below it.
As the stock 'shines up' from finish, look at the reflections. How straight are your lines, how true are radii, how flat the long lines? Don't be afraid to go back and shape up what needs it before going further.
Craftsmanship is about 90% patience and perfecting what most won't see.
The grip cap and fore-end tip look more like Bubinga than a rosewood. The same advice applies. Both are tropical, oily hardwoods.
The spacers are no doubt maple and will never be 'plastic (ugly) white' in color. Acetone will take away most of the stain from the tropical wood.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks again J, Your help and advise have been a tremendous help.
Last night I took a small 2'X3' pcs of sandpaper and rolled it into a stick just barely wider than the white wood line and very carefully sanded it out. Also wiping constantly with a clean cloth. Took a little while but I finally got it looking very nice. May try working on that a bit more now that it has dried overnight.
 
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Most certainly will post photos. Especially after all this!
I have a question; You did not state the chambering of the rifle. Reason for question; By removing the top 'bridge', in converting from the thumbhole design, the strength of the stock is significantly weakened. While I doubt that recoil will cause failure (unless....!), if you were to fall on the rifle or drop from any distance (say horseback), that small portion right behind the grip is definitely the weak point, especially if the grain tends to be 'curly' in that area. Just something to be careful of.
From what I see on the Richards site, they only offer rosewood tip and grip caps and maple spacers. I saw no other options for wood choice, but I could be wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
crooked creek my friend I think you are becoming confused. So I will try to sort this out. This fall I have been working with 3 different stocks. 2 are for a Savage Model 10 in 223. The first stock was a Boyds Varmint Thumbhole. That stock I mounted and fired it but found it to be uncomfortable. Do not like my thumb thru a hole. felt restrictive.

The second stock is a Boyds Spike Camp which is also a Thumbhole design but it is more of a pistol grip and yet I can still move my thumb outside of the hole in a more conventional position. That stock is still on the rifle.

This stock is a Richards Microfit Field Trekker with what they call a Tactical Grip. There was never a Thumbhole on this stock. When finished it will be mounted on a Savage Model 11 that is currently in 243 Win but will be rebarreled into something else that I have not decided upon yet. My thinking are these; 6mm ARC, 6mm BR Norma or a 250 Savage.

The purpose of this rifle is to just shoot paper targets at the range I work and am limited to 300 yards So not a real concern of reaching out to 600 or 1k yards. The thought of the 250 Savage is to just be different than everyone else.
 
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