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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Not sure if it is called that or referenced as that on the site but it was stated that way on my invoice.

I can't wait to see the finished product also but I am still not going to hurry.
 

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I hate actual plastic white line spacers and was pleased to find, as this thread progressed, that you had maple spacers. FWIW, I would enhance the maple in your finishing and you'll have a spiffy stock!
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
IFWJW, I would enhance the maple in your finishing and you'll have a spiffy stock!
Explain please, unfamiliar with what you are saying.
 

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I don't know any good stock finish that will keep maple bright. It darkens by oxygen and UV light so the only thing available is epoxy and lacquer finishes. All the oil will give it an amber glow that I find appealing.
There are two ways (at least) of blocking the oil finish from the maple but not worth the trouble. Super glue and thinned epoxy will seal the maple but if any gets on the other woods it seals it too.
My first rifle project in gunsmiths school was a thumbhole, heavy barrel, M98 25-06. I made the stock from black walnut 3/4" flooring with 1/32" Pecan veneer between walnut layers. The thin pecan gave it 'pinstriping' that followed contours. Quite attractive at the time. ;)
 
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Once you get the maple cleaned up and looking nice again apply clear shellac to seal the surface. Shellac is also available in amber, and orange, but you will want clear if you want the maple to remain white. Shellac can be sanded and re-coated with the finish of your choice in an hour or so, usually less. Shellac's solvent is alcohol, penetrates deeply, dries exceedingly fast, and it prevents the color bleeding seen when filler sanding adjoining contrasting colored oily woods. Top finishes like True-Oil, Birchwood-Casey, Spar, Poly, Min-wax, or what have you that are thinned with mineral spirits or turps cannot attack shellac. Shellac used as the first coat (or many coats) sanding sealer is the furniture makers best friend. The first few coats of finish (sometimes the entire finish) on a grand piano are shellac. Once you have tried shellac as your sanding sealer you will never look back. Scouts honor!
 
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