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Discussion Starter #1
Some ver friendly people answering my 'hello' asked how gunlaws were in France.

I made up some paper about the present gunlaw in France but unfortunately copy and paste is not possible neither placement of attachments, so I keep it short.

In 1998, the first EU (European Union) gunlaw came into force which forbids the unlicensed possession of any firearm.
In theory, licenses are almost impossible to get for individuals unless:

1) accepted member of shootingclub for at least 1/2 year;
2) having passed a special hunting-course and in possession of 'passed' document.

When documents as such can be presented, one may apply.

Guns are categorized in 8 divisions. The major division is cat. I in which all firearms are mentioned that are included in this category, which are all hunting rifles and handguns.

Obtained licenses are for a limited period of time only. In general one year. Then one must apply for a new license or an extension of the former one.

Some arms are free of license: antique's that are unfit to fire and replica's that cannot fire.

The gunlaws in the European Union are under continuous change. Nobody knows excactly anymore which is in practice and which is not due to the mix-up of EU laws and local regulations.

Very very difficult alltogether since France did copy the DUTCH gunlaw which is the tightest gunlaw in Europe. There, even toyarms are categorized as firearms.
 

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baba chui Thanks for the information on gun ownership in France/EU. Sad to see the decline of gun ownership and western civilization in general. Not surprised. But we are a couple liberal Supreme Court Justrices or a liberal treaty or two away from joining our Euro Brothers. Just think how the liberal cry baby "educators" will suspend a young boy for doing what is natural -drawing a gun or even making a "finger gun." The tide is generally going in our favor but not certain. We need to keep fighting the good fight.
 

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thanks baba chui. Informative.

I guess I don't feel so bad for our gun laws then. Here, you need a liscense too, but it's not terribly hard to get, and once your in, your in. After that, it's just a little paperwork to buy a gun. Handguns are different, where you need written permission to take it out of your house and then you can only shoot it at the range, but still definitely doable. There are some guns that are illegal (designated as "prohibitted") that shouldn't be (they aren't a big deal), and some that require the same paperwork as handguns (designated as "restricted") that shouldn't be either, but all told things could be worse.

I'm glad to hear the laws aren't stopping you. Happy shooting! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
@ Grandenigma

No it doesn't stop me. The huntingcommunity that still excist here are the very hardliners. I do hun in the mountains of wher I have a permit for one (1) chamois per annum. The rest I do in Africa. I am playing with the thought of doing a Kodiak hunt & Fishing trip the end of the year. November or so. Maybe not the best time but the summer I am most possibly in Malawi and Mocambique.
As we have a large estate that belongs to my sister I can do as I please.
 

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chui, does the EU give some form of logic behind the strict gun control? As an EU member are countries bound by these regulations?
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
@ PAX

They do. The major problem so far is the fact that some memberstates twist the rules and pursue their own political agenda,
Unfortunerly - and I believe it is in the USA not different - the whole gun issue is a political issue.
The member states are bound by the final regulation but the real enforcement is often a matter of local views. Comparable to differences of opinion between State and Federal law enforcement.

The EU directory is quite simple at the basis:
All arms in 4 Categories: The first category includes all military and heavy equipment, AP mines, torpedo's laserarms, laserscopes, special ammo (incendiary) detachable guns above cal .22 etc.
Alltogether a very long list that includes also some knives (butterfly, springstiletto's)

Second Cat: all sports- and hunting arms. Must be subject to license which is limited in terms of validity; No issue of licenses to minors under 18;

The problem is that in the former Eastblock countries and now members of EU, local law is far more liberal than in the west. Another point is the huge stocks of arms the Russians left in their former satelite states; those stocks still remain and a huge illegal weapontrade had begun. Not in hunting rifles but pure military equipment like AK's AKM's, handguns, grenades etc.
Which made the slogan "Only criminals will be armed" became perfectly true.

There is no gunlobby of significance in the EU - the political mainstream is too much squared up against any of possession of arms. Something that is starting now in the VS if I am reading right.

I'll continue this, it might give you a better view of regulations in Europe. If any particular question just ask.
 

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chui, thanks for the EU gun control overview. It sounds quite restrictive and expensive and probably is leading to less and less younger new shooters being introduced to the sport. The Swiss seem to be in a "lope hole" with the weapons they can posess. Is that because they're a standing citizen army? I see that you travel and hunt out of Europe. Do you take your sporting guns with or ship ahead? At any rate good hunting this season and be well mon ami.
 
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