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Discussion Starter #1
I'm really hoping some of you Model '92 guys can help me out here, because I'm really confused about a problem I'm having a real problem with my rifle. It's an original Winchester '92 that my dad had worked on about a year ago, to clean up and tighten the action and replace the original barrel with a Green Mountain barrel in 44/40, which is what it had originally.

Up until recently I had no trouble with this gun, but when I went to shoot it today, I found that the hammer will not stay back in the cocked position. This hasn't happened before and I have no knowledge of the inner workings of the gun, so if it has to be taken apart, I will find a local gunsmith that can work on it. I'm just hoping one of you has an idea what is wrong with it so I know what's going on before I take it in.

Any thoughts? :(
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I just called my dad and he said the internal workings of the gun were not examined when the new barrel was replaced, so I'm guessing something has broken, internally. I don't know much at all about lever guns but I'm guessing Davers is correct and it's a worn out or broken sear. I'll definitely take it to a gunsmith as I don't want to get it apart and not be able to get it back together! :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
UPDATE: I am able to manually hold the trigger forward and then successfully cock the hammer. With the hammer down, there is a great deal of "play" in the trigger itself. Does this suggest a broken trigger spring?
 

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UPDATE: I am able to manually hold the trigger forward and then successfully cock the hammer. With the hammer down, there is a great deal of "play" in the trigger itself. Does this suggest a broken trigger spring?
Could very well be a spring issue, Jason. Might check the sear though too.
 

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UPDATE: I am able to manually hold the trigger forward and then successfully cock the hammer. With the hammer down, there is a great deal of "play" in the trigger itself. Does this suggest a broken trigger spring?
Sure could be a broken OR detached trigger spring and, as Davers suggests could also be wear in either the sear OR full cock notch in the hammer itself. Your comment on the great deal of play in the trigger suggests a spring problem. The trigger spring is flat stock with a hole for a retaining screw. The trigger and sear are together as one part. The hammer has a safety notch as well as a full cock notch. The '92 action is pretty simple but would be best disassembled with some well fitting, hollowground screwdrivers at hand. Due to the age of your gun, anything could happen once you start to turn the screws so taking it to a qualified gunsmith is not a bad idea.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for that info, Marshall. I will talk to the local gunsmith and see if he's familiar with this action.
 

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It's been a while since I had mine apart but I think you can get to the spring by removing the but. Not a big job.
You need to go a little deeper than that. After removing the tang screw and buttstock, the hammer spring, hammer screw, and hammer come out next. Then the lower tang assembly slides out of the receiver to access the trigger/sear and trigger spring. True, it's not a big job but it helps if you have an instruction sheet along with some well-fitting screwdrivers to preserve those old screw slots.
 

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I have a Rossi replica Model 92 and taking it apart is more difficult than for a modern military rifle. I bought the dvd from stevs guns and it really helped. Especially if you remove the bolt/ejector, getting it back together is a bit of a trick.
 
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