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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone. Im getting into handloading rifle ammo. Wanted to know what the best modern books are on reloading procedures/data. I know a lot about the steps and stuff i would just like a really good book to learn as much as i can. And obviously i would like some good data to go along with it. If you know of seperate books for the different topics thats still great. Thanks for your time
 

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Most will recommend Lymans Manual and I would add Modern Reloading by Richard Lee if you are going to use Lee Precision equipment.
 

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What jmortimer said. Also get the Lee book whether you use lee stuff or not because of the cast bullet info and data.
 

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You might also consider the 8th edition of the ABC's of Reloading. It's a great book for someone just getting into reloading, whether you are interested in metallic or shotshells.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
well i been reloading shotshell for a wile so im fine with that. I also know a good amount about rifle reloading as well. I know the steps, and a lot about differnt catriges and presses etc. I just know that theres defidently more that i could learn so im not sure if that book would be for me. How in depth does it go in? Just thought I would ask to see if its going to see if I need it. wondering what your opinion is? bc again i have a good amount of knowlege about reloading just want to know as much as i can. Thanks!!
 

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Any of the major bullet manufacturers - Speer, Hornady, Sierra, Nosler - offer good manuals with good reloading procedures, and loading data. Many powder manufacturers offer good manuals, although those tend to be more heavy on the data vs procedures. Powder manufacturer manuals can be obtained for free from many gun shops. Bullet manufacturer manuals will run you $30+/-, and you want to get new ones every several years as powders and bullet offerings change over the years.

Good luck twp.
 

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Another vote for the Lyman reloading manual.
 

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The Shadow
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+2 on the lee books.
 

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well i been reloading shotshell for a wile so im fine with that. I also know a good amount about rifle reloading as well. I know the steps, and a lot about differnt catriges and presses etc. I just know that theres defidently more that i could learn so im not sure if that book would be for me. How in depth does it go in? Just thought I would ask to see if its going to see if I need it. wondering what your opinion is? bc again i have a good amount of knowlege about reloading just want to know as much as i can. Thanks!!
Sounds like you need a subscription to Handloader magazine, not another beginner reloading manual. The individual manufacturer books are more about specific load recipes than handloading techniques, so if that isn't what you're looking for, they won't be much help.

Do you have any specific questions about reloading, to provide us with an example of what you'd like to know more on?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
i dont think i really have specifics. i was just reading some posts and a guy wrote that since hes been neck sizing his shells hes been getting a lot more use out of them and it wasnt something i knew. so i just wanted to get to know as much little things as i can. like i said i know a lot of steps but u guess what im looking for is more about things other than that if that makes sence
 

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For general information and process theory I would say read the Lyman book first, then the Lee book, and then do it again in that order. The powder manufacturers probably have the best data to use for their products, and likewise for the bullet manufacturers. For cast bullets, the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook is indespensible.

My opinions, YMMV.
 

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Hornaday .....I think the current Hornaday books are some of the best stuff on the subject....spendy, but comprehensive, especially on the cartridge case and how to properly size and reload it....very detailed on how the case fits the chamber and what happens when the gun goes bang.....also comes with reasonably good ballistic tables.

Lyman's manual is also good, and cheap, comparatively speaking to some of the others.....
 

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The Lyman's 49th edition Reloading Handbook has a very good "how to" section that covers all the steps and proceedures in reloading metalic ammo. If at some time you want to use cast bullets, the Lyman's Cast bullet Handbook is the place for info. A good library would consist of ABCs of Reloading, the Lyman Handbooks, Lee Modern Reloading, one or two from bullet manufacturers (choose the one that you use), and one or two from powder manufacturers. You can't have too many manuals...
 

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The Lyman's 49th edition Reloading Handbook has a very good "how to" section that covers all the steps and proceedures in reloading metalic ammo. If at some time you want to use cast bullets, the Lyman's Cast bullet Handbook is the place for info. A good library would consist of ABCs of Reloading, the Lyman Handbooks, Lee Modern Reloading, one or two from bullet manufacturers (choose the one that you use), and one or two from powder manufacturers. You can't have too many manuals...
+ 1

If you really get into reloading, you'll probably wind up with all of the above and you could scarcely go wrong, following that exact plan.
 

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Sounds like you need a subscription to Handloader magazine, not another beginner reloading manual.

Do you have any specific questions about reloading, to provide us with an example of what you'd like to know more on?
Rifle and Handloader are really the only gun magazines I ever read anymore. Ver low BS factors, practical writers, (or they usually make statements I agree with based on my own experience).

I don't have very many handloading references myself, well, not more than a couple dozen, but I wouldn't part with several generations of Lyman, Speer, Hornady, Nosler, Hodgdon, Alliant, Lee, PET LOADS!!! ..... and many years of handloader. I find researching loads by referencing several sources, almost as much fun as loading and shooting them. And, I can do that even after dark, or when it's pouring rain. :)
 
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