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Hello,

One of the big advantages of hard cast bullets that is mentioned frequently is a large meplat. However, many people claim that even with fairly low velocity, you still have deformation of the bullet which can effect penetration.

I'm new to cast bullets, and have never hunted with solids, but I recently noticed that there are solid bullets that also seam to have a large meplat. The bullet I looked at was a Barnes Banded Solid.

Why not just use that bullet?

P.S. By "new to cast bullets" I mean trying to learn about them. The only experience I have with cast bullets was a negative one. I purchased bullets at a gun show for my .44 special, and they made a horrible mess of my barrel.
 

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There is much information right here on the commercial side of this site that would answer your questions. Much of what is going on now in hard cast bullets is due to a man named Veral Smith who created Lead Bullet Technology ("LBT") Assuming the solid holds together it would perform just like a hard cast but the lead hard cast will be easier on your barrel. This site should answer most of your questions. Properly used the hard cast should not lead-up your barrel. Should add that the bullets sold here are hard but not brittle and there should be little to no deformation.
 

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The flat meplat on the Banded Solid is there to ensure straight line penetration, especially if heavy bones are struck. Flat point bullets tend to chop their way through obstacles and also have their center of gravity farther forward than a spitzer or round nose bullet, making them more likely to penetrate nose forward. Spitzer and RN bullets (asuming they are also non-expanding solids) are more likely to deflect when striking bone, wander off a straight path or yaw while penetrating than a flat nosed bullet.

Hard cast flat point bullets are quite effective at taking game, but are mainly used in handguns at relatively low velocity, where the chopping action substitutes for bullet expansion. They also tend to penetrate deeply and in a straight line, but must be made of a proper alloy to avoid excessive deformation (or they might be heat-treated to achieve the same result).

You could use those banded solids for hunting medium game, but you would probably have to do quite a bit of tracking after the shot because they would make small (but deep) holes compared to an expanding bullet. Plus they are terribly expensive and may not be allowed in some jurisdictions that might require an expanding bullet. Expanding bullets tend to penetrate in a straight line (if they retain a good percentage of their weight) because their center of gravity shifts forward as they mushroom.

Personally I use JHP's for handgun hunting for deer and would use a good hard cast heavy WFN for anything bigger. From a rifle I prefer a good expanding bullet for anything short of pachyderms (and I will never be able to afford to hunt them).
 

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As mentioned, solids are pretty expensive compared to lead especially in the bigger bores. They do offer maximum strength and will hold together no matter what they hit. If I were hunting dangerous game, thats what I would use. Barnes offers a complete line of solids in nearly every bore diameter.
 

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I've loaded 300gn hardcast for my 454Casull and 540gn w gas check for my 45-70. Both would stop a Train and get an A+ but if you like hot loads they get a C- because of lead build up even when greased properly.
 
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