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Hi everyone,
     As many of you know I recently purchased a Ruger revolver and returned it to the factory for service. I got a letter from Ruger acknowledging their receipt of the gun on 3/13/02. Today is one month exactly. From some other posts I got the impression Ruger's service was rather quick. Now I'm wondering if my definition of quick is different than other folks' ! I was thinking something like Leupold, who had my scope in and out in a week. Counting shipping it was gone two and a half weeks. Since a handgun must be shipped next day air I don't think we can blame shipping time!
      Has anyone else returned a gun for repairs to Ruger or any other manufacturer? If so, what was the turnaround time? I guess I'm getting impatient!
                                   IDShooter
 

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I had to ship the same rifle to Remington 3 times, ID.  Each time it was more than 6 months before return.  The last time it was a week over 10 months, and the problem still existed.  I finally traded it at a gun show for a Ruger.  As I understand it, Ruger is much more customer responsive than others.  Hope you get it back soon.
 

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ID, I bought a used Ruger a couple of years ago, a Model # 1, in .22-250. The gun was in good shape with a nice chunk of wood. However, it wouldn' group worth a hoot ! After trying 2 different scopes, cleaning barrel with JB bore cleaner, and numerous known handloads, same results. Sent the gun to Ruger, they re-barreled the gun free of charge and turned it around in about a month. Give them a call for an ETA of your gun. They are very customer oriented in my past experiences. By the way, I really enjoyed your article on the re-finish job on your 336A .30-30. Now I've got the itch to find one.
 

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ID, Most importantly, the returned gun is now a tack driver ! 1/2 " groups are the norm with just about any load. Again, just call the fine folks at Ruger and inquire about a turn around time. Believe it not, they'll be glad to hear from you!
 

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ID,
I had once sent a Blackhawk in to have a new cylinder fitted. At the time, revolver production had just been moved from Southport Ct. to Newport N.H. The gun was gone for close to 2 months. When i got it back, the grip frame was scratched, the cylinder did not LOCK upon cocking!<!--emo&:(--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':('><!--endemo-->  2 pivot pins had the blueng "worn" off as from rubbing or something. I was fuming to say the least <!--emo&:angry:--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/mad.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':angry:'><!--endemo-->
I then called Ruger and spoke with Dick (forgot his last name) He was totally sympathetic and expressed his concern that what had happened to my gun was "totally un-acceptable" He asked for the serial # of the gun and told me to ship it back, which i did, and he intercepted it and "walked it through" the service process. I received the gun within 2 weeks this time. All the abuse that was apparent from the 1st visit had been corrected. I summed up the poor service(in the beginning) as having been caused partially by the production move from Ct. to N.H. although that does not excuse a cylinder that would not lock! Hope your repair goes better!

Scott
 

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ID,

A very good friend just returned a Mark II that has a bulged barrel from ammo failure and he was told to expect the gun in 7 to 7-1/2 weeks. I suppose this happens sometimes. Years ago my brother returned a Speed Six and it was back inside of ten days. Go figure.
 

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I have sent in a Ruger MK II Bull Barrel Target model and it was repaired and sent back 2 weeks later. I sent in a Remington rifle and it took about a month. No problems and the customer service people were very nice.
 

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I have sent 2-Pistols back to Ruger to have them repair them. One of them came back within 2-weeks with the same problem.  The cylinder would lock up.  That gun was sent back 2 other times for the same problem.  Problem was never resolved.  Customer traded it a gun show(Bearcat).
The other pistol was a Vaquero it took about 1-month to get that one back and Ruger gave that pistol a complete overall and with a new barrel. At no charge.  On one they did an excellent job, but the other one not so good.

Remington on the other hand was a different story. I had to send back a REM 710 3 times to finally they got it working right.  That took a couple of months.

Winchester Md 70 took about 2-months to get that one fixed.  The weld had broke on the bolt handle.  You could move the bolt handle real easy but the bolt would not move.

From those experiences I wouldn't know which one is better.
 

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Hello all,
    I called Ruger last week while I was home with the Martian Death Flu. They called back a couple of days later (Friday) and said the gun had been rebarrelled and was awaiting reassembly and test firing. They said I would have it back this week sometime. Sure hope so!
     Thinking back, I've had to send back two guns in the past. One was the first rifle I bought when I turned 18, a Rem 700 30-06. The stock promptly cracked at the pistol grip. I sent it back and they replaced it quickly, two weeks or so. I had a Ruger M77 338 Win. that copper fouled so badly I couldn't get it all out with an Outers Foul Out. I worked at a gun shop at the time and we had a "community" Foul Out, you just had to buy the solution. Well, I used up a whole jug of the Cop-Out and it still wasn't clean. Ruger rebarrelled that gun and installed open sights, only charging me for the sights. I can't remember the exact turn-around time, but it wasn't long. I was less patient then than I am now! But at the time, they were very nice and service seemed pretty quick. This time I got a whole different feel the first time I called. I wasn't overwhelmed with confidence that they were going to take care of it. But I must say the last lady I talked to was really nice and it'll be good to have the gun back. Hopefully they put a good barrel on it this time!  IDShooter
 

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I own a gun shop and am returning firearms for repair quite often.  For the most part the repairs are handled rather quickly.  I believe it depends on their work load more than anything else.  Ruger, Remington, Winchester, S&W, Savage and Rossi all are quite quick.  Taurus has been terrible in the past.  As I seldom return anything to Marlin I forgot to mention them; they are prompt.  Thompson Center was the best in years past but leave a lot to be desired since the fire.  What I find more exasperating than service is the availability of newly introduced firearms.  The companies/writers/distributors hype up a new product only to have the various manufacturers drag their heels on actual production.  For instance, try to obtain a NEF 17 Hornady rimfire or a Ruger Gold Label!
 

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I have sent two guns back to the factory.  The first an Iterarms Virginion Dragoon.  This one had a broken fireing pin.  Took it back to the dealer where I bought it and they sent it back.  Took about three months.
The second was a USRAC Mdl 94 Trapper in .45 Colt.  The front sight on this is a sintered metal of some sort and pretty fragile.  It got broke off.  Plus the rifle had a very oversized chamber that was causing split cases.
It took four months to get this back.  Four months to simply put on a new barrel.  
Once that one came back I still wasn't satisfied.  The sight on the new barrel tilts to the side now.  I will eventually have a gunsmith reset the sight.
My experiances with factory repairs has so far been unsatisfactory.
 

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Mr. Miller:  I have returned two of the Trapper 94 model in 45 Colt caliber for broken front sights.  The last one had the barrel replaced with a 44 Magnum as they had no other barrels available for the 45 Colt.  Seems that the front sight was installed prior to drilling and rifling the barrel.  The 45 Colt diameter was large enough that the front sight was bored and rifled.  Now that is very interesting when comes to replacing or drifting the front sight!!  You might want to check the barrel you have prior to having a gunsmith work on the front sight.
 

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<!--emo&:0--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':0'><!--endemo--> Boring and rifling the front sight.  Ouch.
Mr. Snow,
As I type this I have my Trapper in my lap.  I just used a good strong flashlight to check the inside of the barrel.  There is no sign that the front sight is dovetailed.  Actually there is a gold line around the bottom of the front sight.  It appears that it is sweated on.  
I will mention this to the gunsmith when the time comes.
Thanks for the caution.
Mine was bought new in 1986, and has the skinny barrel.  Way too thin to even attempt to dovetail a sight into.  I remember some years later USRAC brought out a larger diameter barrel with the dovetailed sight.  Glad I didn't buy one.  

Joe
 

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Hi,
I too, sent a Virginian Dragoon (357) back to the factory. I was shooting when the ejection rod and housing popped off and sprang downrange.  The local gunsmith recommended that I send it back because repairs would damage the bluing.  The pistol went TO the factory with a 5'' barrel.  Just a few weeks later (I don't remember exactly how long,  but it was faster than I'd have thought) it came back with a brand new 6" barrel.  What a nice shooter.  I ought to send more guns to the factory!

Erich
 

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My first experience with Ruger was about 15 years ago.  The ejector rod housing on my 44mag SBH had come off due to the screw boss separating from the barrel.  This was before they started screwing directly to the barrel.  It was a simple repair to re-solder the screw boss.  It took six months!  Hunting season came along in the meantime and I bought another 44mag SBH to use since I was certain I would never see mine again.  I did finally get it back.  At least they fixed it right the first time and I didn't have to send it in again.

My second experience was about 5 years ago with a Ruger GP100 .357.  For some reason the cylinder would bind up during cocking; both single and double action.  It was so bad as to require the assistance of my left hand to rotate the cylinder into lock position.  This happened on more than one occasion, the last time after only 10 shots with a clean gun.  I packed the gun up just like it was and sent a detailed note explaining the problem, including the fact that I was sending it to them uncleaned just as it came off the line after experiencing the problem.  After 2 months I got my gun back with a note that said there was nothing wrong with it except I needed to clean it!  I traded it in on something else and have never purchased a Ruger double action since.  A friend has recently purchased a SRH .454 and it has the same problem.  It is practically impossible to fire double action and often needs assistance rotating the cylinder during single action cocking.

My most recent experience with Ruger actually worked to my advantage.  I purchased a used OM .357 Blackhawk with the intention of using it as a platform for a custom gun project.  The more I looked into the idea the more expensive it became, so I gave up and traded the gun at a dealer for a 45 Vaquero.  About a year later I started wishing I hadn't given up so easily and decided to look for another OM .357.  My first call was to the same dealer I had traded with.  He started laughing when I told him what I was looking for and said he had just recieved my old one back from Ruger.  Turns out he sent it in for the safety upgrade before putting it in the counter for sale.  He got it back with a timing problem.  He sent it a second time and got it back with the same timing problem.  He sent it a third time and finally they got it right.  It only took them one year, but was just in time for me to buy it back from him, which I did.  Of course the custom project includes putting it back to original lockwork, so it was all for naught!

If at all possible, I will never send a gun to Ruger for service, although on the one occasion I was glad it took them so long to get it done.

Good luck with yours!
 

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Chuck,
I have two OM Rugers, and Ruger will NEVER  see either of them again.  I have seen too many OM's messed up because of the cheep conversion unit, and their lack of care when doing the work.  I have also had several people, including gunshops, tell me that the OM's came back with mix-matched parts that couldn't be reinstalled.  So if mine ever need work, I need to find a good gunsmith.  Altho I haven't been able to find one I'm happy with yet.

Plus it is getting so expensive to ship a gun to the factory, that it is almost more cost effective to have a local smith fix the thing.

As for the cylinder binding I had a similar problem with a S&W 25-2.  Only when firing live ammo would it bind up.  Double or single action.  Only after being fired a bit.  Turns out the cylinder had just a bit too much end shake and that was causing the binding.  When a local smith removed the endshake, no more problem.
 

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I recently sent a bfr .454 back to magnum research. After only about 150 rounds thru it it bound up when cocking. Always on the same 2 chambers. I sent it back with a note explaining the problem & also mentioned the trigger could be better. It came back 3 weeks later working fine, with a much improved trigger. Although they state the warranty period is only one year I was very happy with what they did.
 

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Hey fellas!
    I got my GP-100 back last night! The bore on the new barrel looks much better. I should get a chance to shoot it next week, maybe Wednesday. The gun has a few scuffs and handling dings from them working on it, but nothing major. There was much less fouling in the barrel than the first one. Oddly, it appeared that they proofed it with a jacketed round and then shot lead bullets for range testing, as there was lead fouling over top of a little copper fouling in the bore. Not much, but enough so it was detectable. Also, they shot .38 Specials in it as evidenced by the powder fouling in the cylinder. Kind of curious.
     On the repair order that was included it indicated that they replaced the barrel, replaced the cylinder, replaced internal components as needed, repaired the crane and repaired the trigger guard. I wonder why they replaced/ repaired parts that were new and undamaged? Who knows, at least it's back. Can't wait to shoot it!       ID
 

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Hope it shoots right for you ID, nothing worse than a gun that doesn't shoot right.

Keeping my fingers crossed for you!!  Please post your results.
 
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