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Discussion Starter #1
Question for you all. Have a TC Hawken that i had built as a kit approximately 20 years ago. Always had been a very accurate rifle. Progressively, the rifle would shoot high. Rear sight adjusted all the way down. Still approximately 1 foot high at 50 yards. Have always been very meticulous about cleaning after each day's shooting. After cleaning, would run a patch down barrel with WD-40 to displace any water. Have i taken the "seasoning" out of the barrel? Any ideas? Have not changed powder charges (90 gr FFg or RS Pyrodex) and .490 round ball.
 

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It depends

Sounds like you need a higher front sight to lower the point of impact. That is how I corrected the same problem. Not sure about "seasoning" because I do not do that to my muzzleloaders. All the best...
Gil
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sounds like you need a higher front sight to lower the point of impact. That is how I corrected the same problem. Not sure about "seasoning" because I do not do that to my muzzleloaders. All the best...
Gil
Agree that a higher front sight would take care of it. I'd like to have some idea what caused it to start with. It was dead nuts on previously, then started shooting high. Ran out of adjustment and still a foot high at 50 yards.
 

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pretty typical of TC's crappy rear end sights. My hawken and tc omega had the same problem. I'd just buy a set of after market sights for it and throw the others away.
 

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First off, that is a pretty stiff load. A friend of mine and my son-in-law both have .50 T/C Hawkens. Both shoot dead on at 50 yards with 70 grains of FFg Goex. Lowering your powder charge should also lower your point of impact. 70 grains of FFg, pillow ticking patch lubed with Ballistol oil and a .490 ball is very accurate and a good deer load. Never had such a sight problem with their T/C Hawkens, nor my .54 T/C Hawkens. All of our sights work just fine.
 

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anoher possibility is that the barrel is not fully seating against the hooked breach. Pull the barrel and check for something in the hooked breach area. Something is preventing the barrel from seating vorrectly. Progressive shots keep going high idicate that the gap is getting wider between the hooked breach and the barrel. Something is not allowing the barrel to seat against the breach correctly.
 

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Are you still using the same lot of powder from 20 years ago, and the same patch material? Same lube? A change in any of these can make big changes on paper, much bigger than stripping out any "seasoning".
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Are you still using the same lot of powder from 20 years ago, and the same patch material? Same lube? A change in any of these can make big changes on paper, much bigger than stripping out any "seasoning".
No, new RS Pyrodex, but is same lube. I'm just surprised that i'm out of adjustment and shooting that high. Something changed obviously.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
anoher possibility is that the barrel is not fully seating against the hooked breach. Pull the barrel and check for something in the hooked breach area. Something is preventing the barrel from seating vorrectly. Progressive shots keep going high idicate that the gap is getting wider between the hooked breach and the barrel. Something is not allowing the barrel to seat against the breach correctly.
Barrel is fully seated at the breech. The tennon pin still goes through the bottom the barrel same as always. No binding, just a nice snug fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
First off, that is a pretty stiff load. A friend of mine and my son-in-law both have .50 T/C Hawkens. Both shoot dead on at 50 yards with 70 grains of FFg Goex. Lowering your powder charge should also lower your point of impact. 70 grains of FFg, pillow ticking patch lubed with Ballistol oil and a .490 ball is very accurate and a good deer load. Never had such a sight problem with their T/C Hawkens, nor my .54 T/C Hawkens. All of our sights work just fine.
That's typically the load that i'd normally target/hunt with. Max load on the rifle with a round ball is 110 gr FFg or RS Pyrodex. Maxiball maximum charge is 100 gr powder.
 

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Maximum loads are for safety, not accuracy. If you are getting good results with 70 grains, stay with that. Adding more powder will raise your point of impact and normally ruin accuracy. If it's been a while since you've shot that rifle, things change. You might be holding a little different, different sight picture or even your eyes. 20 years ago I didn't need glasses, but we all get old. Wish you luck.
 

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What have you protected the bore with? You mention after cleaning you ran WD-40 down the bore. Was this your bore protector? If it was I suspect the WD-40. The reason I stopped using it on my rifles is, while it is a great Water Displacer it will produce a gummy build up over time.

What I would do is take the barrel of of the stock. Get some JB Bore Paste and follow the directions on it. They are clean the gun, then use gun oil and lightly oil the bore. Now run that bore paste at least 100 strokes in that barrel. A stroke is down and back. Change patches after every twenty strokes.

Then I would boil that barrel and scrub it with a good nylon brush. Wear good leather gloves as that barrel will be hot. Set it outside, pour some dish soap down the bore and then fill it with boiling water. After you have done this and no more soap is coming out. Take that barrel (it will be HOT) and use some solvent, and with a nylon brush, scrub the bore of the rifle.

After you have brushed that rifle then a few solvent patches and finally I use Isopropyl Alcohol to do the final cleaning. It also displaces the water and alcohol will burn. After that dry patch the barrel and then oil the bore with a good quality gun oil.

What you have done is taken that barrel back to when it was new, on the insides. After all that, try it at the range and see if it does not shoot a little better. Normally that will fix my stubborn rifles.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
What you have done is taken that barrel back to when it was new, on the insides. After all that, try it at the range and see if it does not shoot a little better. Normally that will fix my stubborn rifles.[/QUOTE]


I had wondered if that is what had happened. That's quite the recommendation you have suggested. Not sure how i'd boil the barrel just yet because of it's length. I'll see what i can come up with.
 

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Take the barrel out of the stock. Get a tea kettle and get some boiling water going. Put on some leather gloves. Take the barrel outside. Put a new bore brush on a ramrod. Take some dish soap and put a good squeeze down the barrel. Now fill the barrel about 3/4 way with boiling water. Now with that bore brush scrub the bore of that barrel. The scrubbing will make the soap come to life and the soap and heat of the water will lift old oils, greases, grime, etc off the barrel. Now fill that barrel and that stuff will float right out the top of the barrel.

Also it does not hurt to take a .30 caliber brush on a rifle ramrod and push that down to the cone of the barrel and turn it clock wise. That will scrub the cone. Make sure you rinse all the soap out of the barrel. While it is clean and hot, then put some gun oil on a patch and swab the bore. As the barrel cools, it will draw that oil into the metal.

That is how I boil a barrel.
 

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I see your problem, its your powder. Get you some real black powder and ill suspect your point of impact will drop. I have never had any luck with pyrodex in a muzzleloader.
 
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