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Hello guys. I'm currently stationed at Fort Carson in Colorado Springs and am very interested in reading through some of these forums. Also i am going to buy a reloading press in a month either a hornady lnlap or a dillon , I have no idea about how to reload but have spent 3 days straight reading on it so if anyone wants to give me advice i would appriciate it :) .
 

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Either a Dillion or the Hornady Lock N Load would be a good choice. Many recommend starting with a single stage but many don't. Depends how much you will be shooting but I don't see any reason you could not start off with a progressive. I would get Lyman's reloading manual. Sounds like you are headed in the right direction. As always I would recommend Lee Precision Classic Cast Breech Lock or Classic Turret and if for some reason you end up using Lee Precision equipment I would get Modern Reloading by Richard Lee. His take on the history of reloading is worth the price of the book alone.
 

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First of all, thank you for your service, that we might have the freedom to reload, and to discuss it in an open forum!

Reloading is, or can be, a remarkably simple process. In essence, you resize the empty case and replace the consumable components; the primer, powder and bullet. At the same time, there are quite a few little details to be aware of and safety items to which you must pay strict attention.

If you start with a complicated progressive machine, be sure to treat it as a single-stage, initially. This will help you learn the process, bit by bit and possibly help you avoid frustration. If you are going to buy only one reloading manual, I would suggest the 49th Edition of the Lyman Reloading Handbook. Read the first few sections on procedures at least a couple of times. Have it all clear in your head, what you will be doing, and in what order. If you intend to shoot a particular bullet from one of your guns, and the Lyman book does not specifically cover that bullet, I recommend buying the corresponding reloading manual for it.

Are you planning to reload a high volume of pistol or rifle ammunition? I still have a single-stage press and reload between 1,000 and 3,000 rounds of ammo, annually. I enjoy the process and don't want to "get it over with" too quickly. You may not have as much free time and may want to crank out the rounds so you can get back to shooting. Either way, if you have questions, you will find no better resource than the guys on this forum, to help you out. :)
 

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"...will look into the lee equipment presently" As much as I bleed Lee Precision blood for you it would be best to get either a Dillion or Hornady Progressive if you decide to start with a progressive. The Lee Precision progressives are a good deal and will work but require attention and "tinkering" and are popular but Dillion and Hornady are trouble free for the most part. All the brands work but I can recommend the Lee Precision Classic Turret or the Classic Cast Breech Lock if you decide to go with a single stage or turret press. I would also recommend reading the owner reviews on Midway USA and Cabelas for any piece of equipment you want to buy. The reviews will provide much useful information.
 

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What are you going to be loading? My experience has been turrent and progressive presses work ok on the 308 size brass and smaller, but have never cared for them on larger brass and not at all on big, belted magnum brass. My only turrent press in probably a whole lot older than you so maybe these new ones handle the big brass a little better. I will only use mine for neck sizing and bullet seating, almost no full lenght resizing.

Also, if you happen to be living on base/post, make sure you check with you're housing office. Most place strick limits on how much you can keep in you family quarters.

Reloading is not difficult, just take you're time, check and double check you're loads and then check them again. If there is any doubt, or question, no matter how stupid or small, get on here and ask before you do it.
 

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7RESOLUTE7,

Welcome to the forum. Rules are to join in and have fun.

A fellow on another forum left a link to Sinclair's basic reloading series of YouTube videos, and they might be worth your time to look at, as well as doing your reading. They are here.
 

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I would (and did) start with a single stage press. It is easier to check yourself that way.
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You will get all sorts of advice… some contradictory, so here is mine.
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I would (and did) get a RCBS Chargemaster Combo… and you will need a case trimmer if you plan to handload Rifle ammo.
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Good luck & have fun and BE SAFE!
 

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Buy the Lyman reloading book or the ABC's of Reloading by Chevalier and read it. Understand every facet of the basic reloading process and the purpose of the equipment.

Then buy a reloading kit from any of the major reloading equipment manufacturers. Don't matter which one. I prefer RCBS but you can make excellent ammo with any of them. I strongly recommend a single stage press over a progressive set-up. The kit will come with a reloading manual. Before you do anything, read it. Hopefully what you fully didn't grasp from reading the first book, will get explained in a different manner in the second manual.

You will need to buy a few things that the kits do not provide. Reloading dies, a caliper, and a trimmer are the necessities.. I think Lyman is the only kit that comes with a trimmer.

You can search any of the shooting forums and any questions you may have will have been asked umpteen times.

Good luck.
 
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