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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, a friend found this in their grandma's closet. Is this an old factory presentation gun? Aftermarket work? Cheap repro? Looks like a H & R Priemier with a square back trigger guard. Anyone have any ideas?
 

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Hi everyone, a friend found this in their grandma's closet. Is this an old factory presentation gun? Aftermarket work? Cheap repro? Looks like a H & R Priemier with a square back trigger guard. Anyone have any ideas?
It is nice work whoever did it. Factory records or an original order for the piece would be needed for credible provenance. I would hunt around for a H&R collector's group and go from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the ideas. Family anecdotes describe it as a HR but we are now thinking maybe a Smith and Wesson?
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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There ought to be more markings. Pic of the other side? Did you look under the grips? Open the gun up and take more pics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Good morning, other than the name and town of the artisan who applied the gold finish, the six digit serial number (300xxx) and the number 2 on the cylinder face there are no obvious markings . Did not want to muck with the grips to see what might be underneath. I will try to take some more pics later today . Thanks for the reply.
 

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It should be marked in small letters on the very top of the barrel rib. I'd need to see more of the gold to determine how it is applied. The close-up of the top latch shows inlaid gold. I thought it was a chinese decal at first but the photo made my heart jump.)
I can't imagine that much work in an H&R but fully understandable in a S&W.
The 'name of the artisan' could effect the value by several hundred percent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is the top of the barrel. It shows the name of the gold worker and his town. There are a few scattered examples of his work online. Beautiful stuff, but didn't see any other firearms.
 

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I'm pretty sure that's the name of a jewelry company in Paris. The gold seems to be applied leaf but I can't figure out the punch borders. I'm purely guessing that is a display piece as advertisement for the jewelry company. Possibly as an branch opening in San Sebastian.

The gold borders can't be inlayed because there's no support for it on the corner, and I see a place or two where the gold is gone and there's no 'ditch' left behind. So. it is probably 'appli K', phonetic because I cant get close to spelling it, that is applied by burnishing gold leaf into a lacquer matrix. Those triangle peck marks mean something but I don't know what.

The gun is well used but seems to have been well polished before the decoration. The name on top is in the swale where the maker's name was.
That could be an Iver Johnson. The trigger guard is not original, IMO. Or at least the original has been altered.

SO many guns used the same patents or close variations of the same I&J 'Hammer the Hammer' patents, that sometimes only the single action sear in the very rear of the trigger guard is different.

It's not I&J. They had flat hammers and the only serial numbers on the butt had prefixes.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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The only cartridge (that large) by Smith and Wesson in a break top was 44 Russian (H&R didn't go that big, Iver Johnsons maybe ?) This one is likely a S&W Model 3 (circa 1870 to 1915) with the S&W logo "removed" for the gold inlay process. There were two (or three) trigger guard designs on the Model 3.

One might contact the Cody Museum and chat with one of their experts.

RJ
 

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The only cartridge (that large) by Smith and Wesson in a break top was 44 Russian (H&R didn't go that big, Iver Johnsons maybe ?) This one is likely a S&W Model 3 (circa 1870 to 1915) with the S&W logo "removed" for the gold inlay process. There were two (or three) trigger guard designs on the Model 3.

One might contact the Cody Museum and chat with one of their experts.

RJ
Although SW #3 was also chambered in 45 Schofield. This is not a SW Schofield...latch is different. Not sure if SW American or Frontier.
 

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Mother of Pearl or a good imitation.
Some imitation MOP is pretty good, but the real stuff is cold to the touch and the sharp corners degrade over time with micro chipping.
 

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It's a S & W Double Action 4th Model, see here: S&W Break Top....What Did I Buy?

OR:

Also, it's a 5 shot 38 S & W, not a big bore. Look at the photo with the barrel forward (the one with his watch showing), see how small the cylinder is compared to the heel of his hand. The shots that make it look larger are depth of field illusions (like the giant bass when the fisherman holds his arms way forward).
Also, I called and asked Grandma what it was!!;):)
 
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