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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys I would like to throw out a challenge to yall. I am trying to identify an old rifle that used to belong to my grandfather. I have only a few photos of the rifle and I'm hoping maybe someone could help me out. My father shot the rifle as a teen and he is pretty confident the rifle was manufactured pre 1950. All I know is the caliber is a 270 Winchester. My father was thanking it was an old Winchester but hes not certain. He does remember that he did not remember seeing a manufacturer stamp on the rifle back in the day. Maybe one of yall might recognize it and be able to tell me what it is.
100035
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The action is a 1951 FN. The stock is a Bishop semi-inlet. The barrel contour is typical FN but the stock is not.
The scope is a very early Bauch and Lomb mounted in the first version of the Kuarsky Bros mount used often with those scopes.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
The action is a 1951 FN. The stock is a Bishop semi-inlet. The barrel contour is typical FN but the stock is not.
The scope is a very early Bauch and Lomb mounted in the first version of the Kuarsky Bros mount used often with those scopes.
100037

The action is a 1951 FN. The stock is a Bishop semi-inlet. The barrel contour is typical FN but the stock is not.
The scope is a very early Bauch and Lomb mounted in the first version of the Kuarsky Bros mount used often with those scopes.
The picture I just posted is the rifle from back in the day with my uncle and I've been trying to look online and match it up with what I can see from the photo
 

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Don't know what it is,.... but, I LIKE,... especially that trigger, very interesting.
 
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The trigger has an Ace trigger shoe on it.
There's one way to tell for sure. Remove the front scope mount and see if it has an ornate, decorative FN logo on top. That would mean and FN barreled action was bought to stock with the Bishop (IDed by close pistol grip, large size and long foreend. Herters also had a very similar stock design.). The FN51 actions and barreled actions were sold by many mail order sporting goods outfits including Herter's.
Judging by the parts and the styling, I'd say 1952 to 1955 would be date of birth.
 
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Thank you very much for the insight on the rifle. I am pretty sure I've tracked it down and I'm in the process of retrieving it. I cant wait to see it in person. I really appreciate you looking at it and letting me know more about it. My father will be very excited to see it again.
 

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The trigger has an Ace trigger shoe on it.
There's one way to tell for sure. Remove the front scope mount and see if it has an ornate, decorative FN logo on top. That would mean and FN barreled action was bought to stock with the Bishop (IDed by close pistol grip, large size and long foreend. Herters also had a very similar stock design.). The FN51 actions and barreled actions were sold by many mail order sporting goods outfits including Herter's.
Judging by the parts and the styling, I'd say 1952 to 1955 would be date of birth.
You seem to know a lot about this setup, what's with the extra scope ring above the bolt?
 

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The scope rest between two cams situated like Vee blocks. One cam moves the scope up and down. The other rest has a cam that moves the scope left and right.
The ring is holding a spring clip that holds the scope down on those two cams. Later models had a spring bar that ran UNDER the cams and held the scope down onto the vee cams.
The system was designed to zero your scope for many different rifles because the zero was in the MOUNT and not the scope. It was a very strong, fast and accurate rig that seems to have died from ugliness and internal adjustable scopes.
My shooting buddy in gunsmith school had such a rig and it was nearly impossible switch zeros on the range with it.

Here are pictures of how it works with a later model that uses a star wheel to tighten the scope to the mount and was strong enough to work. The simple snap in arrangement showed on the OP rifle was very fragile and uncertain.
 

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In the 1950's a lot of barreled actions were purchased by both professional and amature gunsmith's , unfinished semi-enletted stocks were offered by at leat 4 companies I can remember offhand , all available through mail order . I just enjoyed working on guns , and have lost track of the number of sporting rifles I put together for friends and my self .
You may not find a "factory" name on it ... I didn't mark any of mine but I love to see those custom sporter rifles from that era .
Your's is a first rate specimen .. A FN Mauser action for the base , custom walnut stock (could be Bishop ?) the scope , bolt forged to clear the scope , iron sights and trigger are all better than average ... I can't say which gunsmith did the work but evidently a very professional job was done .
A very nice rifle indeed !
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I've found the rifle, it has been passed off and in the closet of one of my fathers distant uncles out in California. I've contacted this relative and they have agreed to ship me the rifle. When I get it in my possession I will take some better pictures and post them.
 
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