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Discussion Starter #1
I'm new to the site and I have a few questions that I really need help with..
I have a 30-06 Remmington 770 with a 6x24 mildot scope that I use for hunting, I have figured out how to range my target but getting the correct mil adjustment is getting past me.
How to I take the information and transfer that to the correct adjustment?
Once again I have a remmington 770 and I,m shooting a 180 gr sp round with a bullet drop of 4.2 @200 and point target @100. Also I'm zeroed @ 100. What adjustment do I need to make to hit a target @ 200 and 300 yards?
 

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Hi David,

Welcome here. Play nice, join in and you'll fit in grandly.

As for your question, I won't be too much help, but I'll give it a shot. If your scope is graduated in 1/4 MOA clicks, that translates to 1/4" at 100 yrds, or 1/2" at 200 yrds. To zero at 200 yrds, you will have to make ~8 adjustment clicks (which would be ~4"). Without knowing your drop at 300 yrds, I couldn't tell you the adjustment, but there are guys on here with ballistics software that might be able to help a little more.

See you around the forum,


Matt
 

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This isn't the end all-be all for what you need, but visit the following link:

http://www.winchester.com/LEARNING-CENTER/Pages/Ballistics-Calculator.aspx

This is a ballistic calculator provided by Winchester. It should give you a good idea of different trajectories in different bullet weights and designs. You can also play with temperature and wind, and see how they affect things. According to that, a 180 grain Power-Point will be 4.2 inches low at 200 yards (if sighted in at 100), 8.9 inches low at 250, and 15.4 inches low at 300 yards.

Sighting your rifle in for 200 yards with the same bullet will give you a maximum rise of 2.2 inches (at 125 yards), 3.5 inches low at 250, and 9 inches low at 300 yards.

Check it out and play around with it.

In your current setting (assuming 1/4" MOA adjustment on your scope), you would want to make 8 "clicks" at 200 yards (for 4" adjustment), 14 clicks at 250 (for 8.75" adjustment), and 21 clicks at 300 (for 15.75" adjustment).

At least that is, if my math is correct...I AM awfully tired...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks that is very helpful, just one thing I don't understand. ok if a 180 gr power shock round has a 4.2 in drop at 200 yards do you make your adjustment to 200 and then drop 8 clicks or will the 8 click bring me on target.
 

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I would sight in about 2 inches high at 100 yards and then ignore the range out to about 300 yards. For hunting, you can assume your "target" is at least 6 inches in diameter. Your bullet will neither rise above line of sight, nor fall more than 3 inches below line of sight, out to almost 300 yards with a sight in of about 2 inches high at 100, so just aim at the middle of what you want to hit and trust the laws of physics to do the rest. Google "maximum point blank range" to understand the principle.
 

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If you have a mil dot scope you most likely have a mil adjustment not a 1/4" adjustment on you adjustment knob. Assuming you got the scope new they should have explained that in the booklet that came with the scope. If they didn't then you have a little fun coming up because you are going to have to learn to think in mills not inches or centimeters. Its not hard just different and once you get used to it it is as easy as the minute of angle most of us use. I have to mil dot scopes and I have used them enough that I just automatically switch gears but when I first got them it was a little..............well a lot confusing at first. This will pass, trust me.

There are a lot of sites that explain how to adjust and depending on what make your scope is the site I listed here may not be the right one for you. You get a chance to explore the internet to find the right one for you. The differences is why I am not going to try and tell you how to adjust your scope because all I know about your scope is it is a 6x24 mildot scope.

http://www.snipershide.com/node/1

Good luck, have fun, you may never go back to MOA again after you get this programmed into your head.
 

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If you have a mil dot scope you most likely have a mil adjustment not a 1/4" adjustment on you adjustment knob. Assuming you got the scope new they should have explained that in the booklet that came with the scope. If they didn't then you have a little fun coming up because you are going to have to learn to think in mills not inches or centimeters. Its not hard just different and once you get used to it it is as easy as the minute of angle most of us use. I have to mil dot scopes and I have used them enough that I just automatically switch gears but when I first got them it was a little..............well a lot confusing at first. This will pass, trust me.

There are a lot of sites that explain how to adjust and depending on what make your scope is the site I listed here may not be the right one for you. You get a chance to explore the internet to find the right one for you. The differences is why I am not going to try and tell you how to adjust your scope because all I know about your scope is it is a 6x24 mildot scope.

http://www.snipershide.com/node/1

Good luck, have fun, you may never go back to MOA again after you get this programmed into your head.

Thanks for catching that. I was so concerned with looking at the round that I never even caught the mildot bit.

lludavid-

If sighted in at 100 yards, the 8 "upward" clicks would bring you on target. Keep in mind though, that as Old Grump just mentioned, my use of inches will likely go out the window anyway, as your scope may function in milliradians (mills) instead. Saskshooters reccomendation is a good one, and while I personally would make it 3 inches high at 100 yards instead of his two, I would not concern myself with the whole mildot scope thing for the .30-06.
 

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I zero mine and then don't touch it. I sight in 2" high at 100 yds. For my round this puts me dead on at 200yds and 7" low at 300. I can hold dead-on out to about 250 yds. and at 300 plus I just aim higher to compensate.
 

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If you have a mil dot scope you most likely have a mil adjustment not a 1/4" adjustment on you adjustment knob.
That's not necessarily true. I have two mil-dot scopes that are both 1/4 MOA adjustments. One is a Leupold and the other is a Super Sniper. My third mil-dot is a Leupold Mark 4 and it has the BDC dial on top for a specific caliber but it's 1 MOA per click on elevation and 1/2 MOA per click on windage. So it's really going to depend on make and model of scope.
 

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I'm new to the site and I have a few questions that I really need help with..
I have a 30-06 Remmington 770 with a 6x24 mildot scope that I use for hunting, I have figured out how to range my target but getting the correct mil adjustment is getting past me.
How to I take the information and transfer that to the correct adjustment?
Once again I have a remmington 770 and I,m shooting a 180 gr sp round with a bullet drop of 4.2 @200 and point target @100. Also I'm zeroed @ 100. What adjustment do I need to make to hit a target @ 200 and 300 yards?
Are you wanting to know how many "mils" you need to hold over at various ranges to hit your target or how many clicks you need to adjust up to hit your target?
 

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That's not necessarily true. I have two mil-dot scopes that are both 1/4 MOA adjustments. One is a Leupold and the other is a Super Sniper. My third mil-dot is a Leupold Mark 4 and it has the BDC dial on top for a specific caliber but it's 1 MOA per click on elevation and 1/2 MOA per click on windage. So it's really going to depend on make and model of scope.
A mil-dot scope with MOA adjustments? Isn't that kind of counter productive?I thought the whole point of using mills was because it is a constant at any range? I mean, I guess you can put any reticle in any scope, but then, is it really fair of the manufacturer to call it a mil-dot?
 

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Should be marked on the dial and if he has the paperwork it will say there. I didn't say it was mils I said it most likely was.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I zero mine and then don't touch it. I sight in 2" high at 100 yds. For my round this puts me dead on at 200yds and 7" low at 300. I can hold dead-on out to about 250 yds. and at 300 plus I just aim higher to compensate.
MY SCOPE IS A VARIABLE SCOPE AND WHAT I'M TRYING TO GET IS TRANSFERING THE INFORMATION INTO THE CORRECT ADJUSTMENTS
 

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Are you wanting to know how many "mils" you need to hold over at various ranges to hit your target or how many clicks you need to adjust up to hit your target?
YES, i need to know how to take the range to target and drop of the round and get the correct adjustments ....i have a variable scope 6x24
 

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some things best learned by practice ..but these fellas got you close enough to start learning you rifle an rnd..
paper figures just get you close ..then you practice on paper to nail dn what the facts are..then you use that knowledge on real game..jmo slim
 

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YES, i need to know how to take the range to target and drop of the round and get the correct adjustments ....i have a variable scope 6x24
Okay so I take it you want to know which dot to hold on your intended target to hit it at 200 yards. Here's the scoop. A mil is 3.6 MOA. This means it is roughly 3.6" from the center of one dot to the center of the next dot or center of crosshairs to center of dot at 100 yards. Actually minute of angle is not exactly 1.0" but its close enough unless you are planning on doing some REALLY long range shooting. Anyway, this would mean it is 7.2" at 200, 10.8 @ 300, and so on. If your rounds hits 4.2 inches low at 200 yards and you have a 100 zero this translates to 2.1 MOA. Thus you would need to hold over about 2/3 of a mil to hit your target.

Now if I was wrong in my assumption and your want to know how many clicks you need to adjust your dial to hit your target heres the answer. Assuming your scope has a 1/4 MOA adjustments you would need 8 clicks up. Obviously if it has 1/8 MOA adjustments you would need twice that many and if it has 1/2 MOA, you would need half that many. Hope this answers your questions.
 

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A mil-dot scope with MOA adjustments? Isn't that kind of counter productive?I thought the whole point of using mills was because it is a constant at any range? I mean, I guess you can put any reticle in any scope, but then, is it really fair of the manufacturer to call it a mil-dot?
Actually it is very common for American made or American marketed scopes with mil-dot reticles to have 1/4 MOA per click adjustments. Mil-dots easily translate into a known MOA amount so I don't really see that it would be counter productive or confusing. I know some of the scope makers such as Schmidt and Bender and Night Force use a click value of 1/10 mil but Leupold, Nikon, Bushnell and others use 1/8, 1/4, or 1/2 MOA depending on the model of the scope.
 

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I have 2 IOR 6X tacticals and the turrets are 1/8 MIL clicks. I don't know why the manufacurers mix mil-dot reticles with inch adjutable turrets. Never made any sense to me. I would get a mil-dot master it makes using the reticle alot easier, and you can calculate MOA and millradians for your drop.
 
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