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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am currently looking at the Henry Color Case Hardened 45-70. I have been wondering if the case hardening is real or just a dye/fake. I also have been wondering if there is a coating or finish I could apply or have applied to the gun that would protect against rust and still keep the look of the case hardening. I have been looking all over old threads and the internet and cannot find very much information on this. Thanks for any information
 

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Jpw

Modern case hardening responds well to regular use of Johnson's Paste Wax for cleaning, rust resistance and surface protection. It is a good hard floor wax for hardwood floors, it is tough stuff, tough enough to walk on.

You might also like the protection water based polyurethane varnish gives if applied carefully with a swab or very soft artist brush that wont leave brush marks.

Gary
 

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Not sure if true or not but I heard Henry's color case was a chemical treatment. If so I'd imagine it could be easily defaced by even light handling or by cleaning products.
 

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WOW!! I went to the Henry web site to get a look and the first thing that I saw was a very clear close-up of a muzzle with NO CROWN at all. Do they expect to sell guns with that picture??

The 'color casing' is done by cyanide bath and protected with lacquer. Some solvents remove lacquer and it'll fade out pretty quick after that. Many companies do the quick and easy cyanide method but it's too dangerous for a small shop. The most notable user is Perrazzi.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you for the responses. I noticed that it did not have a crown also but my plan was to have it cut down to 20" and recrowned because I like the handling of the guide gun but find longer barreled guns easier to shoot so as I did with my M1A, Im going in between
 

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All rifle barrels have "crowns". There are many different "crowns". The Henry just happens to be a flush or 90* crown & will shoot just as good as if it had an 11*, recessed or other type crown. I have several rifles that way & don't experience any problems with them. If the Henry case coloring is "fake", then why buy one?
 

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I can't find the page now. This morning, I did a search for Henry rifles and went to their web page. Right on the front was a very close-up picture of the muzzle of an octagon barrel with NO crown and VERY roughly turned. The perfect example of the worst muzzle that can be pictured. I can't help but believe somebody saw that and started cussing and deleting.

https://www.henryusa.com/rifles/big-boy/

Is anybody going to defend THAT workmanship?
 

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Recessing a crown is to give it some protection against dings and cleaning rods run in from the muzzle. Harold Vaughn tested various crown cutting angles and found that as long as they were cut symmetrically, the gun's precision on paper was unaffected, and an 11° was no better than a 30° or a 45° or even a steep 60°. What the 90° crown has going for it is that it takes less skill to get it square. When making a 90° clean-up pass on a lathe, even if you don't center the bore with an indicator and a 4-jaw chuck first, you still get symmetry as long as the chuck holds the bore parallel to the spindle axis, whereas even an 11° crown requires the bore be centered first to be symmetrical. So, the 90° cut is more easily made true, but it not only offers no ding protection, it has a tendency to cookie-cut patches on their way into the muzzle.

But I am talking about a finished cut. That photo shows a cut so rough, I'm not clear I could do that badly on purpose. The contrast with the high gloss of the sides of the octagon makes it look worse. I'm guessing a dull parting tool was used to remove the end of the barrel blank at too high a feed rate, and they just left it that way. If it were mine, that crown would be redone in a heartbeat, even if just for aesthetic reasons.
 
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I'm guessing a dull parting tool was used to remove the end of the barrel blank at too high a feed rate,
Exactly--I've eaten chocolate chip cookies smoother than THAT!
 

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Yup, appears to be a rough parting tool cut. Think it got over looked for finish crowning. Strange it was on the web site. Guess not everyone at Henry is gun savvy.
 
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