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I have a Herters J9 Mauser in 22-250, and cant find a serial number. Under the handle on the bolt there is a number 162, would that possibly be the serial number, I will take the barrel off to see if there is a number under it at a later date, just wanting to see if anyone knows if this number 162 could be the serial number. Also, what the approximate value would be in NEW condition, not a mark on it.....has a weaver 10x scope on it.
 

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IF the barrel was installed on the action at purchase, there is usually a serial number, but bare actions were often not numbered. Herter's offered actions and barreled actions in BSA-made U-9 in many calibers.
Check gunsinternational dot com for BSA rifles for what somebody thinks they're worth.

I don't know if the J series was before or after the U. I suspect later because the U listed in 1966 was well before the 22-250 was introduced. So, it's either and action that was barreled as a wildcat or ?? I think Herter's was out of business in 1981 and I don't think they sold guns or actions after the GCA'68.

How is the caliber marked on your barrel? Does the butt of the barrel have proof marks?
Are you sure the model is a 'J' instead of a 'U'?
 

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Before 1968, rifles were not required to have a serial number, and many didn't.
The Herters J9 Mauser rifles were marketed before 1968 as well as after, so some may not have a serial number - mine doesn't.
 

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Before 1968, rifles were not required to have a serial number, and many didn't.
The Herters J9 Mauser rifles were marketed before 1968 as well as after, so some may not have a serial number - mine doesn't.
I found the serial number,under the stock, 44829
wish i could find out what year production?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
IF the barrel was installed on the action at purchase, there is usually a serial number, but bare actions were often not numbered. Herter's offered actions and barreled actions in BSA-made U-9 in many calibers.
Check gunsinternational dot com for BSA rifles for what somebody thinks they're worth.

I don't know if the J series was before or after the U. I suspect later because the U listed in 1966 was well before the 22-250 was introduced. So, it's either and action that was barreled as a wildcat or ?? I think Herter's was out of business in 1981 and I don't think they sold guns or actions after the GCA'68.

How is the caliber marked on your barrel? Does the butt of the barrel have proof marks?
Are you sure the model is a 'J' instead of a 'U'?
22-250, J9 on barrel, proof mark is a T under the barrel in the center of the barrel, there are a few more proof marks on the action but cant really make them out and have already put back together and away in safe. after cleaning and oiling
 

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From your description--- According to DeHaas "Bolt Action Rifles", there is no "J" action, but there is a "U". A few questions to try to date it--
Where is the safety located? On the bolt shroud or on the trigger mechanism?
Is the top of the receiver dovetailed or round? Grooved or smooth?
How long is the action from where the barrel joins to the rear tang?
What scope mounts?
Is it marked "Herter's" anywhere on the gun?
Does the bolt shroud have a little red cocking indicator on the bolt shroud?

IF the barrel were installed by BSA it would be marked B'ham Small Arms Co on top of the barrel and have the normal blizzard of British proofs on the barrel and action. (A dozen or more) Barrel, action and bolt would be numbered alike.

SO, there is a confluence of dates- The U-9 action was first in the Herter's catalog in 1958 and appears last in 1967. The 22-250 became the 22-250 Rem in 1965 but had been a wildcat under several names for decades before it became commercial. The lack of proofs means it does not have a BSA barrel. A capital "T" under the barrel usually means Douglas did it, but it should say "GR Douglas" in tiny letters near it.
No BSA actions only were sold blued. All were supplied in the white.

Contract guns and actions can be serialed according to the order. It is very possible the number on your action means nothing to anybody still alive. Most likely it was an action bought from one of several dealers in the states and a rifle was made around it.

If you'd like to go further with it, send me some pictures of the rifle and close-ups of the action and markings. j belk 09 at gmail no spaces.
 

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From your description--- According to DeHaas "Bolt Action Rifles", there is no "J" action, but there is a "U". A few questions to try to date it--
Where is the safety located? On the bolt shroud or on the trigger mechanism?
Is the top of the receiver dovetailed or round? Grooved or smooth?
How long is the action from where the barrel joins to the rear tang?
What scope mounts?
Is it marked "Herter's" anywhere on the gun?
Does the bolt shroud have a little red cocking indicator on the bolt shroud?

IF the barrel were installed by BSA it would be marked B'ham Small Arms Co on top of the barrel and have the normal blizzard of British proofs on the barrel and action. (A dozen or more) Barrel, action and bolt would be numbered alike.

SO, there is a confluence of dates- The U-9 action was first in the Herter's catalog in 1958 and appears last in 1967. The 22-250 became the 22-250 Rem in 1965 but had been a wildcat under several names for decades before it became commercial. The lack of proofs means it does not have a BSA barrel. A capital "T" under the barrel usually means Douglas did it, but it should say "GR Douglas" in tiny letters near it.
No BSA actions only were sold blued. All were supplied in the white.

Contract guns and actions can be serialed according to the order. It is very possible the number on your action means nothing to anybody still alive. Most likely it was an action bought from one of several dealers in the states and a rifle was made around it.

If you'd like to go further with it, send me some pictures of the rifle and close-ups of the action and markings. j belk 09 at gmail no spaces.
From your description--- According to DeHaas "Bolt Action Rifles", there is no "J" action, but there is a "U". A few questions to try to date it--
Where is the safety located? On the bolt shroud or on the trigger mechanism?
Is the top of the receiver dovetailed or round? Grooved or smooth?
How long is the action from where the barrel joins to the rear tang?
What scope mounts?
Is it marked "Herter's" anywhere on the gun?
Does the bolt shroud have a little red cocking indicator on the bolt shroud?

IF the barrel were installed by BSA it would be marked B'ham Small Arms Co on top of the barrel and have the normal blizzard of British proofs on the barrel and action. (A dozen or more) Barrel, action and bolt would be numbered alike.

SO, there is a confluence of dates- The U-9 action was first in the Herter's catalog in 1958 and appears last in 1967. The 22-250 became the 22-250 Rem in 1965 but had been a wildcat under several names for decades before it became commercial. The lack of proofs means it does not have a BSA barrel. A capital "T" under the barrel usually means Douglas did it, but it should say "GR Douglas" in tiny letters near it.
No BSA actions only were sold blued. All were supplied in the white.

Contract guns and actions can be serialed according to the order. It is very possible the number on your action means nothing to anybody still alive. Most likely it was an action bought from one of several dealers in the states and a rifle was made around it.

If you'd like to go further with it, send me some pictures of the rifle and close-ups of the action and markings. j belk 09 at gmail no spaces.
The J9 was a Mauser action, while the U9 was a BSA action. Both were in the Herter's catalog at the same time. The U9 was considered and marketed by Herter's as an 'upscale' or 'Deluxe' model, while the J9 was the 'lower grade', so to speak.
 

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I had the same memory but can't confirm it by catalog. Do you recall which year? They called the Mark X the "Herters Mark XK3". XK3 actions were $64. Complete deluxe presentation grade rifle was $124. The U-9 high grade was $134. By comparison, a Sako Finnbear was $174. I'd sure like to see a picture.
 

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I had the same memory but can't confirm it by catalog. Do you recall which year? They called the Mark X the "Herters Mark XK3". XK3 actions were $64. Complete deluxe presentation grade rifle was $124. The U-9 high grade was $134. By comparison, a Sako Finnbear was $174. I'd sure like to see a picture.
I don't recall the year. I became a Herter's customer in 1967 and had a catalog every year for many years. My first reloading 'set up' was Herter's, along with game calls (still have one) and fishing rod blanks and such, even bought a pipe and tobacco and cigarette making machine from them! I still have a Herter's catalog (somewhere!) but haven't seen it for several years and can't readily lay my hands on it. As I recall, that catalog was one from the 'later years' and was smaller than the earlier ones, so it may or may not have still contained the firearms products. I'll do a little (a lot??) of digging around to see if I can locate it.
Regardless, I am certain of my information that the J9 was Mauser action based and the U9 was BSA action based.
 

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I've got two catalogs readily available and several more in 'storage' (lost for now). The '66 has BSA U-9s and Mark XK3 (Yugo Mk-X), FN and Sako, actions, barreled actions and complete rifles.
The '68 catalog has FN, Sako and Tradewinds (FN) actions and barreled actions but no BSA.

I'm REALLY curious now. Neither FN or Mk-X has ever been made for short calibers, they just blocked the back of the magazine and extended the ejector. The BSA did have a short action but it had a .222 bolt face. We still don't know what kind of action is on the OP's rifle!

I think its safe to say that Herter's had dropped the BSA rifles by '68 but didn't have a J-9 in '66. We need fill-in information and a picture of OP's rifle.
I just found and bought a '65 catalog. (Everything is relative--In 1966, a Sako peep sight was $6.75. They sell for $200 now. I just paid $40 for a CATALOG that only cost a Nickle in postage to get for free!!
 

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Back in '64, bought 2 of the U9 (BSA) barreled actions and 2 of their 95% completed stocks. One action was chambered for .222 Rem. Mag. and the other for .243 Win. One stock was walnut and the other was cherry wood. Sold the .243 in walnut stock soon after completing and kept the .222 mag in the cherry stock. Later, swapped the 222 mag and a Jap Arisaka for a used Win 70 Super Grade in 300 H&H which later was determined to have excessive head space and in turn was traded for a then new rifle, the Ruger 77 in 7 Rem Mag. That was in '72. Still have the Ruger. No idea where the Herter's went. Understand the Win 70 was rechambered to .300 Win Mag.
 

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Kdub--- There are thousands of old 300H&H rifles ruined with a 300 Weatherby reamer. It was the AI of the day and VERY few were done correctly. MANY fine, custom .375s were made from salvaged actions.
 

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I've got two catalogs readily available and several more in 'storage' (lost for now). The '66 has BSA U-9s and Mark XK3 (Yugo Mk-X), FN and Sako, actions, barreled actions and complete rifles.
The '68 catalog has FN, Sako and Tradewinds (FN) actions and barreled actions but no BSA.

I'm REALLY curious now. Neither FN or Mk-X has ever been made for short calibers, they just blocked the back of the magazine and extended the ejector. The BSA did have a short action but it had a .222 bolt face. We still don't know what kind of action is on the OP's rifle!

I think its safe to say that Herter's had dropped the BSA rifles by '68 but didn't have a J-9 in '66. We need fill-in information and a picture of OP's rifle.
I just found and bought a '65 catalog. (Everything is relative--In 1966, a Sako peep sight was $6.75. They sell for $200 now. I just paid $40 for a CATALOG that only cost a Nickle in postage to get for free!!
Jack,
I found catalogs from '76, '77, '78, and '80. The '76 catalog shows both U9 and J9 actions, barreled actions and complete rifles in various 'trim' levels, some offered with Douglas barrels. No other brands of actions/rifles were available. Both U9 and J9 actions were available in three action lengths, 308, -06, and 300 mag. lengths. None had .222 bolt head size. The '77 catalog shows all levels of J9 action based offerings, but has the following 'footnote' regarding the U9, and I quote: "NOTE: ALTHOUGH WE DO NOT LIST U-9 RIFLES, WE DO HAVE A LIMITED QUANTITY OF CALIBERS LEFT. PLEASE WRITE FOR AVAILABLITY AND CALIBERS."
So, it appears that 1976 was the final year for 'cataloged' U9 offerings.
I have duplicate copies of catalogs No. 87 (1977) and No. 88 (1988) Both are in excellent/like new condition. If you are interested, PM me (or email me if you still have my address?) with your mailing address.
As an aside, I back in the '80's, I had an -03 Springfield (four groove) that had been sporterized that had a Herter's muzzle brake installed.
 

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Thanks for the information! So, sometimes between '68 and '76, Herter's imported a 'new' BSA and renamed it the J-9.
In 1966, the U-9 action still had dovetails, but the shroud safety was gone and a trigger mounted side safety shown.
DeHaas shows four BSA models: Royal, Majestic, Monarch and Herter's U-9.
 

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Thanks for the information! So, sometimes between '68 and '76, Herter's imported a 'new' BSA and renamed it the J-9.
In 1966, the U-9 action still had dovetails, but the shroud safety was gone and a trigger mounted side safety shown.
DeHaas shows four BSA models: Royal, Majestic, Monarch and Herter's U-9.
No, the '76 catalog shows the U9 as the BSA action , and the J9 as the Mauser action. They do make reference in the '76 catalog that the U9 action has "Receiver top flat grooved or new round receiver drilled and tapped uses Herter U9 mounts." That makes it sound like you have the option of either the dovetail OR round top receivers, but there is no option shown for ordering. That statement was in the description of the 'in the white' action only. In the description of the barreled action they only mention the "New round receiver uses Herter U9 mounts." The complete rifle descriptions make no mention of the receiver shape or mounts. In the mount section, they show both "Herter's U9 Dovetail #29A (front) and #29A (rear)" and "Herter's U9 Round Receiver #5A (front) and #6A (rear)". Prices were $1.00 each per base and $5.50 per set of "Herter's Model Perfect Detachable Scope Mounts". You have to wonder how many customers ended up with a mismatch of bases to receiver (?).
The U9 was always only the BSA action and the J9 was always only used as a Mauser action designation. In the description of the U9, they mention: "The famous Herter Mark U9 bolt actions are made in England by her finest old double rifle gunsmiths." They go on to say in that description: "Entire action is made of weapon steel identical to that used in double rifles that sell for $2000 and up.",.....You gotta love old George!!
 

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I've always considered the Herter's catalog as more humor and an inventory of what's available around the world than information.
SO, this Mauser J-9. It's just about got to be a Mark X or a Spanish Santa Barbara. The Mauser 3000 was obsolete by '76 but every supplier had Mark X and St. Barbara actions. The difference is in the trigger and bottom metal (and metallurgy and heat treat). Tradewinds offered barreled actions by Douglas and Flaigs. Tradewinds also imported Mark X rifles with an odd fore-end shape (nearly square) with a reverse angle fore-end tip. "Husky" was the name of the Mark X rifle and the Tradewinds imported Husqvarna rifles also referred to as 'Husky'. (I got stuck on a sight unseen rifle buy one time.)
Tiz a mystery until we have pictures. I PMed the OP but no answer yet.

The old gunmaker's paradox: How could the same people that designed and built Purdy, Boss and H&H shotguns also make Webley revolvers and BSA rifles?
 
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