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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys. I am from South Africa and love everything about rifles. I am currently looking for a stock for my Mannlicher-Schoenauer M1910 i have searched far and wide and maybe you guys have one lying around or know of someone who does or even someone who can make me one. I would greatly appreciate it allot.

Any questions about SA also welcome.
 

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Welcome to the forum Duncan!

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A large portion of the members here live in the U.S., and use U.S. based parts sources. Africa is on a list of destinations that firearms parts cannot be exported to, these are U.S. government restrictions.

You may need to wait for one of the non-U.S. members to reply to your search.

We frequently use a company called Numrich for our parts needs, at the bottom of their home page is a link for Foreign Orders that contain the above mention list. Numrich is also good for schematics and other firearms info.

I have used a company called Western Gun Parts, which is located in Canada, but I don't know if they have M-S parts or export restrictions.
 

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I have always wanted one of these early Mannlicher-Schoenauers. My best advice would be to contact a collectors organization for info' they will know of sources for what you are looking for; see the link below

Mannlicher Collectors Association > Home

I have seen mentioned on the MS forums this outfit; Watts Walnut - Example Blanks I was looking at the site, knock down beautiful wood but I am not sure if you will want to spend this kind of money.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks guys i appreciate the advice . I did contact Watts Walnut via email just waiting for a reply. I really like their stocks.
 

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Those are only blanks for carving, and frighteningly expensive. You can carve your own gunstock from scratch - I've done it for other rifles, including a box-magazine Mannlicher - but I think the Mannlicher-Schoenauer is one of the more difficult cases. The inletting is complex, and to look right it requires thin sides over that wide magazine.

I bought a semifinished stock, made to my order, from Richards Microfit Stocks in the US, and in 2005 the standard length version (minus the longer butt I wanted) was $379 in exhibition grade English walnut. That seems remarkably cheap, and the quality of the work was fine, with little internal work to be done, although the exterior would require quite a bit of slendering down for a rifle like this. The barrel channel does require to be shaped to suit.

The trouble was, the wood, although good-looking and very sound, wasn't anything like as good as exhibition grade ought to be, and they ended up giving me a partial refund. Their communications, even before this, were less than well-organised. They can certainly do you a good stock, if you keep a tight leash on just what quality of wood means.

It is true that there are quite severe restrictions on export of gun parts from the US. Some firms, like Brownells, are set up to get you the export licence, which would normally require a government letter (the original) specifying that the item is uncontrolled in your country, or that you have the necessary authorisation. This is what controls getting gun parts out of the US.

The good news, though, is that I don't believe anything not involved in actually firing the gun is a gun part, in the eyes of the US government. I think there is a good chance that a gunstock can still be freely exported. At your end, it is anybody's guess.

I think the 1910 is a 9x57? A friend has a 9x56, and like many Mannlichers made for heavier-recoiling rounds than the original 6.5x54, has one side of the stock cracked beside the magazine. The recoil lug is rather small. Personally I believe no rifle is the worse for epoxy bedding, if you get the brown epoxy stain from Brownells and experiment with making it match the wood. If I was doing this job again, I would hollow out the sides enough to put a thin layer of fibreglass cloth in the mix inside that recess, and epoxy in a piece of steel strip for the recoil lug to contact.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hey John thanks for all the advice. I contacted quite a few companies and just waiting for the reply. My biggest problem is that the stock was broken when my gran dad went on a hippo hunt and it stepped on it. So i only have the butt of the stock left and the barrel is bent. The barrel isn't the problem a local gunsmith is replacing it. The problem is the stock and the trigger guard.

I want the rifle stock to be done by me but like you said i am scared of the in letting so i want to try and get semi finished stock and just do the finishing touches.

I just need the dimensions of the stock so that i can plan the stock
 

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Hey John thanks for all the advice. I contacted quite a few companies and just waiting for the reply. My biggest problem is that the stock was broken when my gran dad went on a hippo hunt and it stepped on it. So i only have the butt of the stock left and the barrel is bent. The barrel isn't the problem a local gunsmith is replacing it. The problem is the stock and the trigger guard.

I want the rifle stock to be done by me but like you said i am scared of the in letting so i want to try and get semi finished stock and just do the finishing touches.

I just need the dimensions of the stock so that i can plan the stock
 

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Hmm, having a hippo step on your gun is a little more interesting than the usual ways gunstocks get damaged here! :eek:
 

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.

It seems to me that it's most likely a good thing that that Hippo stepped on the rifle instead of your Grandfather - or you might never have been conceived, and posted that fine story for us ................ :p




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