Shooters Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
332 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've done some searches, as well as looked at the entire Gunsmithing section. If I've missed a previous thread, please direct me to it.

My Lake Erie Chemical Company 37mm Gas Gun, basically a shoulder-fired gas-grenade launcher, has a walnut stock, but is missing the recoil pad. There are two screw holes where one used to be. Recoil is not an issue, but appearance and restoration of length-of-pull would be nice, as well as adding to the value.

I purchased a Hogue Grind-to-Fit. It is big enough and the new screw holes will be just offset enough from the old ones to just make new holes, it appears. But filling and redrilling is actually as easy part to understand and do, if necessary.

I am mostly looking for tips and tricks on installing these, especially the "Grind-to-Fit" part. Is it really as easy as the Hogue instructions make it out to be? I plan to use a Ryobi belt/disc sander I got at a yard sale. I will buy a new belt and disc. Hogue recommends 80-grit as the best compromise between material removal and surface finish. Would it be better to use a different grit for the final finish, or a different tool?

This is a walnut stock that I plan to refinish anyway, as more practice and to improve the appearance of the launcher. The Hogue instructions seem lacking in what must be the most obvious part, but I'll ask the dumb question anyway: do I just install the pad and then grind-to-fit while it is installed on the stock? When I start removing wood and rubber at the same time, it's done?

Should I worry about angle of the sanding? Always sand toward the stock, away from the stock, anything except along the length of the pad, or is it even worth worrying about? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,266 Posts
80-grit is ideal. Coarser will be too aggressive. Finer, believe it or not, will rip out hunks of material and leave it looking lousy, if not ruin the whole deal.
 

·
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
Joined
·
24,110 Posts
Most gunsmiths I've watched grinding down a recoil pad had it installed on the stock and using a belt sander, ground with the pad, not the grain of the stock.

My personal method is to layer a couple layers of masking tape on the wood stock very closely to the pad. Using a Dremel belt/disc sander, (best to set up outside due to all the ground rubber mess!) remove the excess down to near finish. Remember to keep the line of the stock (comb and butt) while grinding these areas so they won't have an odd angle when finished. Be careful approaching the grinder to avoid nicks and gouges.

Change the grit on the sander to a finer one and carefully take the pad down to the tape on the stock. I usually use a file to finish off the pad so as to not gouge into the wood. To final finish, the hard plastic backer can be brought to a shine by applying a bore cleaner paste and an oil or solvent for a carrier. Mine is J-B Bore Cleaner and a cloth saturated with Hoppes #9.

Oh, yeah - small wooden dowels from the local hardware store and some Elmer's glue will fill those existing holes and provide wood to redrill as needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
I tape aluminum from a soda can on the stock for final shaping. It is thinner than the masking tape.

+100 on the black/brown stuff going everywhere. I use a 12" disc sander with a shop vac hooked up to the dust port to capture the stuff, but some still escapes.

Have plenty of light on the point of operation so you can see what is happening

Use a light touch. Going from almost done to oh crap happens reallllly fast
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
36,651 Posts
Smokey, you can also use aluminum muffler tape. Works great and much tougher than masking tape.
 

·
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
Joined
·
24,110 Posts
Yeah, Mike - sounds like a trip the the local Pep Boys is in order. How's the stuff treat the stock finish?
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
36,651 Posts
I don't recall it marring the finish. The adhesive is pretty sticky and it may be prudent to test in an inconspicuous area, first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
639 Posts
A recoil pad fitting jig will virtually eliminate the chance of stock damage. It makes grinding on the pad go quicker, too. You can usually align the top screw hole and then you only need to drill the lower hole rather than both holes.

If you're concerned about the adhesive on the muffler tape (an excellent idea, by the way), put it on top of some no-mar masking tape.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
The recoil pad jig is really the way to go. I did two spacers and a pad today for my Sporting clays shotguns and neither one of them (the stocks) ever got close to the grinder. It's really easy, all you have to do is mount the spacer or the pad on the stock, scribe it and mount it to the jig, set the angle and grind it to the line. The only way you can screw up the stock is if you drop the jig and pad on it, don't ask me how I know that:mad:. Greg
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top