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Pre-WWII experimental round. It was never commercially marketed. EXTREMELY rare. Saw a single round auction off for $20. Makes that box of 50 worth about $1000, maybe more with the pristine box!!!!!!
 

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Apparently the rifles and the cartridges for Remington .267 Rimfire were experimental just prior to WW2 and the R&D was shelved when the war broke out and then after the war the project was scrapped. But somehow some ammunition and maybe even a Remington Sportmaster model 612 leaked out if you can believe an owner claiming to have one in his possession that is. SportMaster Model 612 - Remington Society
Below is a link showing a little more info on the Remington .267 Rimfire but info appears hard to come by, (Remington themselves apparently only state the project was scrapped and offer very little further info).
https://forum.cartridgecollectors.org/t/267-remington-rf/231
 

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Those have to be as scarce as bat tracks.
 

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According to Cartridges of the World the smokeless .267 Remington Rimfire was developed from the .25 Stevens Rimfire which was a black powder cartridge with a rainbow trajectory, but reasonably popular at short range (60-70 yds.) apparently from 1894-1935.
Reading between the lines, Remington may have decided to abandon the 267 because the already heavily entrenched .22WRF (forerunner of the .22WMR) had higher velocity and in order to increase the velocity of the 67gr bullet of the 267 even to 1400fps using smokeless powder the pressures were such that it could have been dangerous to use in any 25 Stevens rifle. (no bullet diameters are given but presumably they were the same or very similar and with the same case length)
I’ve got some 22-03 here (22 Win auto for the Winchester 1903 semi-automatic) but I guess those aren’t very rare.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
According to Cartridges of the World the smokeless .267 Remington Rimfire was developed from the .25 Stevens Rimfire which was a black powder cartridge with a rainbow trajectory, but reasonably popular at short range (60-70 yds.) apparently from 1894-1935.
Reading between the lines, Remington may have decided to abandon the 267 because the already heavily entrenched .22WRF (forerunner of the .22WMR) had higher velocity and in order to increase the velocity of the 67gr bullet of the 267 even to 1400fps using smokeless powder the pressures were such that it could have been dangerous to use in any 25 Stevens rifle. (no bullet diameters are given but presumably they were the same or very similar and with the same case length)
I’ve got some 22-03 here (22 Win auto for the Winchester 1903 semi-automatic) but I guess those aren’t very rare.
From the information I garnered out of "The Guns of Remington" book, the .267 was to be a competitor to the .25 Stevens. They do show two rifles made for these cartridges, a Model 610 and 611 that are in private collections. One has no serial number, and the other has serial number 1, both made in 1964.
These two rifles look very close like the Remington 510 and 511. Cartridge pressure was a bit too high for these actions, so the project was dropped.
 

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"Velocity" became the goal so the 5mm was invented instead.

Rimfire rifles don't depend on 'strength' but do depend on 'support' of the rim. Pressures are (severely) limited by the strength of the rim. BUT, the rim has to be weak enough to be crushed by the firing pin, so there is only a narrow 'strip' of pressures allowed.

Repeaters are MUCH stronger than blow-back autos due to the design of the bolt faces, but ammo has to be made for both.

Remember the very first successful .22 rimfire auto was the Winchester M1903 in .22 Win Auto caliber. IF a company wanted to build the world's first locked-breech rimfire to get Hornet performance, they'd have to invent the caliber that fits nothing else and then build a rifle for it. I floated such an idea to Browning in 1970 and it was considered, but not too seriously. They suddenly had problems in vast amounts from salt wood, taxes and European labor prices!
 

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Interesting. As the .25 Stevens Rimfire use a 67 grain bullet of .251" di8ameter and a Barrel Groove diameter of .250" so the bore is smaller. the cartridge was also called the .25-10 RF by some firearm makers to avoid having the Stevens name on their products.
Is the Remington bullet diameter .251" or is it larger?

Chev. William
 

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Interesting. As the .25 Stevens Rimfire use a 67 grain bullet of .251" di8ameter and a Barrel Groove diameter of .250" so the bore is smaller. the cartridge was also called the .25-10 RF by some firearm makers to avoid having the Stevens name on their products.
Is the Remington bullet diameter .251" or is it larger?

Chev. William
I think a clue could be the 67 part of the Remington name for their smokeless version of the 25 Stevens, 67 being the bullet weight and not intended to relate directly to bullet diameter but sufficiently different in name so that people wouldn’t be inclined to use it in a Stevens black powder gun.
But we all know what will happen sooner or later if a more powerful cartridge appears that will fit your existing gun, especially after the supply of black powder ammo dried up…don’t we?
 
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