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I have always been interested in hand loading but I don't know anyone who actually does it and I have no idea where to begin. My 270 model 700 is my primary hunting rifle and my desire to reuse shells isn't just about saving money, it's more about consistent quality of the rounds I use. I've posted on these forums before about the problem I had with Remington ammo and even though my gun prefers Winchester 270 130 grains consistency seems to vary box to box.

Anyway, I have zero experience with hand loading. What rig should I start with, what book/tutorial should I buy etc... Thank you in advance for any info you can provide!
 

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To begin with I would go to www.youtube.com and watch some videos on reloading. There are several thousands on that site. Next, I'd get a good reloading manual from someone like Lyman, Hornady or maybe Lee and read it cover to cover. You could ask at your local gun store if they know anyone in your area that would give you some pointers.
 

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The Shadow
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There is some very very good info in just about every reloading manual I have.
As I have told many people of the years, grab 2 or three of them, and read them from cover to cover, excluding the data. When finished, do it at least one more time.

You should be able to get them all at the library for free, that way you can read several to get the theory of operation, before purchasing a half dozen of them.
My main manuals I use are Lyman, Lee, Speer, Nosler, Hornady.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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I've seen some of these videos of which Blackhawk355 speaks and while most of them contain excellent information and handy beginner;s tips some (not all, only some) I wouldn't follow.

As Darkker said, a good manual will take you step by careful step through the entire process. I just ordered Lyman's 50th to go with their 49th, 48th, 43rd, 38th, 34th and Hodgdon's 26th.

RJ
 

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A manual is a great place to start. Since I'm a reader of things that interest me, the written text and illustrations make it easy to understand. Just viewing videos may work for some but I've seen some that make my neck hair stand on end. Not everyone who makes a youtube video is an expert. Think I would stick with trustworthy sources.
I have an assortment of manuals. Hornady, Lyman and Lee are the ones most often used by reloaders I know.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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The Lyman 50th edition reloading manual is an excellent read for everyone - beginners and old hands alike. Have most all of the manuals and the Lyman is my go-to book.
 

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I started with a Lee manual. Of all my manuals, I think the Lee is best. Or, perhaps I just remember it that way since it is where it all started.

If you have a need/desire to handload a straight-walled handgun cartridge, I think you would get a lot out of doing that first, especially low pressure cartridges like 44spl, 45acp and 38spl. I find these cartridges to be very forgiving. But, that may not be in the cards for you at this time.

Here is a basic list that looks a bit like what I have.

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/658771/redding-2-master-magnetic-powder-scale-505-grain-capacity.

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/276092/le-wilson-micrometer-case-trimmer-stainless-steel-case-trimming-kit

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/176078/lee-challenger-breech-lock-single-stage-press

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/540522/lee-perfect-powder-measure

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/101774921/lee-pacesetter-3-die-set

https://ads.midwayusa.com/product/128288/lyman-dial-caliper-6-stainless-steel

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/348740/hornady-lock-n-load-bullet-comparator-complete-set-with-14-inserts

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/566971/hornady-powder-trickler

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/533891/rcbs-standard-scale-check-weight-set

This list looks a lot like what I have. Some things I'll spend big bucks on, but there are plenty of cheaper options that work very well for other stuff. I've been happy with Lee dies and the Lee press.
Of course, there are nit-picky things like deburring tools for case mouths and primer pockets. I think you would do well with these items if you aren't concerned with speed. BTW, I usually dip my rifle charges straight from the can to the scale with Lee dippers, then trickle. If this pace is fine with you, I wouldn't even bother with a powder measure at this point. I mainly only use the Lee powder measure for pistol.
 

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Welcome, Motorbreath. I hope you find handloading to be an interesting and fulfilling hobby. I believe that reloading can make you a better shooter and hunter, because you have a deeper understanding of how the components work, and their effect on accuracy and terminal ballistics. And while store-bought rifle ammo is probably the best it's ever been, reloading gives you the chance to adjust your loads to get maximum accuracy from your particular gun, or choose a loading that works especially well for the game you want to hunt or the range you choose to shoot.

Like some have said, take the time to learn and be sure your understand what you are doing and why it matters.

And let me add a plug for the Lyman book - I have several others, but it's becoming my go-to, also.
 

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Well video's on how to don't usually do it for me. Problem is most new comers need to ask questions, ya can't ask a video a question. You read a manual and if you hit a snag, simply back up and read it again, if ya still don't get it, come to a site like this. I think a thing that mess's up some people is jumping to advanced methods before they really have the starter methods down.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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+1 on Don Fisher's post. Excellent post.
 
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Reloading is actually very simple, deprime, resize, reprime, add powder and bullet. Doing nothing more than that will get someone started. Eventually a problem will arise, thats when a good foundational knowledge of the process will pay dividends and add safety.
The devil is in the details. If a person is seeking consistency and accuracy, thats when simple becomes more complicated.
 

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To begin with I would go to www.youtube.com and watch some videos on reloading. There are several thousands on that site. Next, I'd get a good reloading manual from someone like Lyman, Hornady or maybe Lee and read it cover to cover. You could ask at your local gun store if they know anyone in your area that would give you some pointers.
Excellent suggestion, there are hours upon hours of reloading videos on YouTube. Those videos will give you a good overview of what you're getting into. Then get your hands on one or two reloading manuals and read them. The most important thing with reloading is detail. Check and double check every load and related data. Reloading can be a lot of fun but it can also be deadly for those who fail to take it seriously.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Excellent suggestion, there are hours upon hours of reloading videos on YouTube. Those videos will give you a good overview of what you're getting into. Then get your hands on one or two reloading manuals and read them. The most important thing with reloading is detail. Check and double check every load and related data. Reloading can be a lot of fun but it can also be deadly for those who fail to take it seriously.
You all have given me great info on what to read, but is there a reloading rig that best suits someone like me?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Welcome, Motorbreath. I hope you find handloading to be an interesting and fulfilling hobby. I believe that reloading can makes you a better shooter and hunter, because you have a deeper understanding of how the components work, and their effect on accuracy and terminal ballistics. And while store-bought rifle ammo is probably the best it's ever been, reloading gives you the chance to adjust your loads to get maximum accuracy from your particular gun, or choose a loading that works especially well for the game you want to hunt or the range you choose to shoot.

Like some have said, take the time to learn and be sure your understand what you are doing and why it matters.

And let me add a plug for the Lyman book - I have several others, but it's becoming my go-to, also.
Thank you very much for the support. Everyone on this forum has always been super helpful.
 
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The NRA offers classes at participating gun clubs. Most clubs allow non members to attend.
Hands on is best for beginners.
 

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Keep it simple...

My experience: Many of us have found from experience to get good stuff. Buy the basic stuff. No matter where this interest takes you a quality single stage press is basic. Also, keep up to date reloading manuals and learn the powder makers websites. Take a look at Richard Lee's most recent edition. Take it easy on yourself. Most people early on the learning curve ask why the **** did I do this too myself. It's a temporary station. Keep moving toward your goal. That's right folks Keep it Simple.
 
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You all have given me great info on what to read, but is there a reloading rig that best suits someone like me?
I started loading my own 270 Winchester rounds 30 years ago. On a friend's advice, dad bought the RCBS RockChucker reloading press and the kit that went with it. For loading small(ish) batches of long bottle-necked cases like the 270, it's still an excellent choice. Others are as good, but I would go so far as to say none are really measurably better.
 

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The Shadow
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You all have given me great info on what to read, but is there a reloading rig that best suits someone like me?
This is dangerous, but here is what I did, and why I still use it today.
https://www.midsouthshooterssupply.com/item/0000690030/breech-lock-challenger-single-stage-press-kit

I bought the Lee kit because of 2 reasons. 1) I started with by bumming MZ5's hand loader, so I knew the Lee name. 2) It had everything short of a book, for a fraction of the cost of any other alternative.
The cast press finally broke after something like a decade(maybe more), and I reload more than most. So I bought the iron press from them. Without getting into the "My dad can beat-up your dad" part of it. You won't be at any sort of dissadvantage with any of this equipment, they have great CS, and you will learn what you do or don't like/want/need.
No one else offers anything near this complete for the money spent. Are there "nicer" things out there? Of course. Will this leave you frustrated and fighting for hours, where the others don't? Absolutely not!

Once I learned(took about 4 readings) loading by volume instead of weight, the perfect powder measure REALLY saves time and works like a charm.

Whatever you choose, I wish you the best!

Cheers
 

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Look on the RCBS sight they have a nice little intro section. You can get into it pretty cheap with the kits they offer.
reloading has a certain amount of danger involved but it's only rocket science if you take it that far. If I can do it anybody can. I like the Lyman manual it is very complete has lots of pictures/illustrations and large print. since they don't make bullets or powder it cover a lot of load combinations plus cast bullet loads.
It's great hobby for people that like to shoot and always wanted to be a machinist.
The best way to start is dive right in.
 
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