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This is from Brownell's tech department.

Rebarreling Your Savage Rifle
By Mark Hudson

This month we’re going to show you how to re-barrel a Savage Model 110 bolt action rifle; one of the easier rifles to re-barrel. The techniques apply to the entire 110 series. All you need is a Barrel Vise (available with either steel or aluminum bushings) with the appropriate bushing for the barrel diameter that you are removing, and a Barrel Nut Wrench. By the way, this wrench works on both the old, round notch and new, square notch barrel nuts.

On the average bolt rifle, you establish correct headspace by lathe-turning the shoulder on the barrel. However, with the Savage, all you have to do is remove the firing pin and ejector from the bolt, insert a GO Headspace Gauge into the chamber, screw the barrel into the receiver until the gauge bumps up tight against the bolt face, tighten the barrel lock nut and you have a barrel that is set up to minimum headspace. Let’s go through the steps, one by one.

First, completely disassemble the rifle, remove the bolt from the action, remove the stock, and, if you have a scope, remove it, too. You can leave the bases on; they shouldn’t get in the way. Completely disassemble the bolt; make sure you remember how it came apart so you can reassemble it later.

Here’s a quick rundown on how to take the bolt apart. Start by removing the rear bolt plug. Depending on the age of your rifle, it will be a large, standard screw slot, on later models it will be an Allen head. Remove the bolt handle, remove the baffle assembly, pull out the cocking piece pin, and remove the cocking piece sleeve followed by the firing pin assembly. Now, pull the bolt head off the front of the bolt. Remember how the washer comes off so you can replace it the same way. Next, remove the front baffle. Remove the ejector so when you are setting your headspace you don’t feel the tension that it adds against the gauge.

You’re now ready to remove your old barrel. Slide the Barrel Nut Wrench down the barrel and onto the barrel nut. Clamp the barrel in your barrel vise and loosen the barrel nut with the barrel nut wrench. If your gun is old or rusted you may want to put some Kroil on the joint at the receiver and the joint between the barrel and barrel nut.

Reassemble your bolt without the firing pin or the ejector installed. Slip the headspace gauge into the bolt face and let the extractor hold it in place. Slide the bolt into the receiver and let the bolt handle fall into the loaded position. Screw the barrel nut all the way onto the barrel, followed by the recoil lug.

Next, start the barrel into the receiver and tighten it down until it just “bumps” against the gauge. Check the recoil lug to make sure it’s locating protrusion is in the recess in the action. Work the bolt handle. You should feel a little resistance at the very bottom of the bolt stroke. If the bolt is tight all the way, unscrew the barrel slightly. If there isn’t any resistance at the bottom of the stroke, tighten the barrel a whisker. When you get that slight resistance, your headspace is correctly set at the minimum.

Clamp the barrel back in the barrel vise. Tighten the barrel nut against your lug and receiver. Use a pretty fair amount of force turning the nut. Remember, you are bringing together four different pieces of steel. I like to snug it tight by hand, then whack it a good one with a rawhide mallet to put the final "oomph" on it.

Double check the headspace by making sure the bolt will close on the go gauge, this time without resistance. Put a piece of .001” or .002” shim stock between the bolt face and headspace gauge and again attempt to close the bolt. You should feel resistance or it may not close at all. That tells you that all is well in the headspace department.

After you re-assemble the bolt with all the parts, reassemble the rifle and scope, you’re ready to head to the range with the rifle you just re-barreled yourself.
 

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I have a Savage 110E chambered in .243 win, is it possible to rebarrel this rifle to 22-250 or simular cartridge and use the bolt that I currently have. What are my options in rebarreling this rifle? I would appreciate any suggestion or information.

Thanks,
Doc "Zero"
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The bolt face for the 243 and the 22-250 are the same, but even if they weren't its only about 18 bucks to change out a bolt face. Basically any cartridge that will fit into a short action will go in your 243 except perhaps for some of the Short magnums. Savage made a larger threaded action for them.

You don't have to change the whole bolt in a Savage to change to a different size case head, just the bolt face. Midway has all the tools necessary, The barrel nut wrench, barrel vice and headspace gauges and barrels for a number of calibers. What they don't have other suppliers like Brownell's, where the barrel change article came from, have barrels also.

Here's a place you can compare cartridge lengths. Once the site comes up just scroll to the cartridge's your interested in and click on them. They will bring up a dimensional drawing.

http://www.stevespages.com/page8d.htm
 

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e.r. shaw is also a good place to get barrels in wide variety of chamberings
 

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I had another question(s). Would it be a problem threading a stainless steel barrel into my factory blued reciever, or should I go back with a regular blued barrel. Also is there much of an advantage to getting a barrel with a twist rate of 1 in 8 (9), in comparison to 1 in 12 (14) other than shooting heavier bullets with more accuracy? I would appreciate anyones oppion or advice on these.

Thanks,
Doc "Zero"
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You can mix and match barrel steel or action steel with no problems. The faster twist barrels will non last long when shooting high velocity rounds such as the 22-250 and the Swift.

As far as a 223 barrel life will be longer for a slower twist gun, i.e. a 1-12 or 1-14 will get a lot more accurate rounds downrange.

I've never understood the need to go to the fast twist barrels for a varmint rifle designed to kill ground squirrels, rock chucks and coyotes which respond very well to 50 thru 55 grain bullets. The faster twist barrels originated with the military and target shooters working both at longer ranges and for more killing power on man sized targets.

.224 Bullets in the 60 thru 80 grain weight are much more expensive to shoot and obviate dollar savings and the reason behind varmint hunting with the small caliber rifles chambered in .224. Heavier bullets don't give any more accuracy at varmint ranges in the 100 to 400 yard range most varmints are shot at.

It's true that a fast twist barrel will stabilize many lighter weight bullets, but a barrel optimized for those mostly used 50 thru 55 grain .224 diameter bullets will last longer shooting bullets that are more affordable and in reality designed for the type of game the caliber excels at.
 

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rebarreling a Model 10 Savage in .308

Will the technique that was sent in from Brownells work the same on a Model 10 Savage? I eventually want to rebarrel my .308 with a new fluted barrel. I also have another Savage Model 10 in .243 WIN. It now has a lightweight barrel, but I have been thinking about replacing it with a heavy barrel and a varmint weight stock. Would that technique also work on this rifle as well?

Thanks!
longrangehunter
 

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The only difference between the 10 and the 110 is that one is a short action (10) and one is a long action (110). They are exactly the same other than that. Anything that is not specific to action length (like a stock) that works on one, will work on the other. The barrel swapping procedure is exactly the same for both models.
 

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Yep, they are the same style action, the 10 is just the designation given to the short action
 

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Hey faucc, sorry to resurect an oldie but I had a follow up question regarding the "4 different pieces of steel" that come together. Are they bone dry cleaned or what? No locktite, teflon tape, pipe dope? just kidding. Just want to put it together right. Thinking about going from 243 to 22-250.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Original Savage barrels use some type of locktite. Most of the folks I know setting them up put them together dry, it makes it much easier if your doing the switchbarrel thing.
 

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You can apply some anti-seize. Its lubricity will let you torque the threads tighter and also will allow you to get it off again, despite the tightness.
 
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I'd be fine with a gun grease here. Just need something to keep the parts from siezing together. Wax would be better than nothing. Oil is anouther thought?

Solvents that you use may "disolve" some of these over time to different degrees.

Important to keep "something" in those threads.

Cheezywan
 

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7mm to a 270

there is a lot to read here so if I missed the answer to this, I apologize. What would it take to reduce my 7mm to a 270
 

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basically, you need a barrel nut wrench, headspace gauge(s), barrel or action vise of some sort and a barrel. Midway or Brownells will have what you need
 

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If its a Savage 110 in 7 mm Rem Mag, you'll need to change the bolt head for 270. They're about $20 at Midway, which is as good a price as I've seen for that bare part. For tools and parts you can also look at Sharp Shooter Supply. They sell the bolt heads, but only as assemblies with all other parts, so they cost more. They have barrel wrenches, barrel vice blocks, etceteral Indeed, you can call them and check on what you need? But, as Smokey said, we don't know for sure what 7 mm you're starting with?
 

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Excellent "sticky"! I am working on re-barreling a Model 10 (very old) from it's worn .243 barrel to .358 WCF. Will that pose any particular problems? For example, will I need to work on the magazine area to get the wider bullets to feed reliably?
 

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Both being children of the .308, the two are identical except for the neck diameter and the 0.070" longer maximum COL in the .358 Win. With the bodies being identical, I expect the same magazine lips to work. Worst case would be if they extend past the shoulder, then widening for the neck might be needed, but I doubt you'll have issues with it. You could call Savage and ask if they know of any reason? You could load a few .243's, and, before you finish seating the bullets all the way, leave them out at 2.780" and make sure they fit and feed OK. I expect they will.
 
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