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Yes people I know our firearms laws suck big time, but we're getting on OK, plenty of people have plenty of guns (legal) with the possible exception of Western Australia. But over here in the eastern States things are not too bad. In Victoria and New South Wales our laws are "manageable" and we have no lack or things to hunt. There's about 5 varieties of Deer, wild pigs, goats, rabbits for starters. If you go to the Northern Territory there are Buffalo, Pigs and scrubbers (wild bush cattle) There are also wild Camels in parts of the country, in fact in the South Australian and West Australian desert country there are around 600,000 of the things, and you can shoot them on sight.
Things may be tough on the buy and sell part but the hunting's not bad.
JD
 

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I did not no we were aloud to shoot them ,I was under the impresion it was a goverment controlled kull.
 

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Don't know where people get all their info on Western Australian gun laws. :confused: Over here if you have somewhere (legally) to use the firearm you can have virtually whatever you like. This does have the same limitations regarding auto and semi auto firearms as per the rest of Australia. You can also have more than one firearm in the same calibre regardless of what people may think !! Regarding the camels in WA, you can shoot them as you so desire, BUT you cannot just go shooting for ANYTHING on pastoral leases (stations to the Australians) without permission from the lease holder. They are the same as private freehold in this respect, and you CAN NOT just go shooting on Government controlled land in this state without specific permits, regardless of what you are shooting. As I am directly involved with the firearm industry here, both as a contract shooter and a licensed gunsmith, I can vouch for the above.
 

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I miss the station shooting.
When I was traveling the sheds shearing I had a ball shooting.
My biggest problem is remebering the farmers name's ,after spending a few weeks sheering sheep in an old shed some were it is pretty easy to forget the expieriance as you go out the gate.
One of the things that kept me going back.
:) many times I have gotten to a gate way 'remembered and groaned!
10 's of thousands ,some time over a 100 thousand acres of land to shoot vermin on.
Rabbit warrens that would take up 1/2 an acre.
I miss that.
 

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Yes people I know our firearms laws suck big time, but we're getting on OK, plenty of people have plenty of guns (legal) with the possible exception of Western Australia. But over here in the eastern States things are not too bad. In Victoria and New South Wales our laws are "manageable" and we have no lack or things to hunt. There's about 5 varieties of Deer, wild pigs, goats, rabbits for starters. If you go to the Northern Territory there are Buffalo, Pigs and scrubbers (wild bush cattle) There are also wild Camels in parts of the country, in fact in the South Australian and West Australian desert country there are around 600,000 of the things, and you can shoot them on sight.
Things may be tough on the buy and sell part but the hunting's not bad.
JD
I find your hunting to be interesting. If you were ever to get up to SW Colorado here in the states I would be glad to show you around. If you wanted to go hunting here I have a supply of good riles for you to use. No need to pack one up here. As one hunter to another I wish you the very best.
 

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You appliy for tags in most cases,depends on the permits you get ,you can get permits in area's were the roos are used for human /pet food or smaller farms ,you are suposed to leave the roo laying were you shoot it with the little paper tag under it.
In one case they shot thousands on an army bàse ,not only did they pay 'get this 'non army shooters a fortune to shoot them they would not allow the use of the meat ,it all got buried ,

The numbers of roos in australia are huge compared to what they were before farming .
Through channel systems and dams .
It is not really hunting ,more like rabbit shooting.
 

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I'm told the meat is pretty good if handled right and of course we all know how good roo hide is to make good leather products. Seems stupid to bury them. What a waste. Is the no eating policy down to some disease or microbe in the meat ??
 

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Not that I no of ,just polotics .
I have found roo meat a bit bitter.
A blue roo is what is traditionaly saught after.
Everey now and again you come accross a small 1/3 full size that has a tinge to it .
When you see one the explanation makes sense ,I have seen two,one was just a couple of weeks ago.
They are more likely not to have a worm problem.
Roos suffer from intestinal and some times meat worms.

I think you would enjoy roo culling ,to do it properly it take a lot of self controle and skill.
Two weekends ago my hunting buddy and I shot 40 .
We saw some were between 150 to 200 but the 40 we shot were the only suitably positioned roos .with the xception of two were the shot was high ,I am putting that down to the cases should of been trimed.
I just got a case trimmer and trimed the last batch, One case the the bolt was stiff ,I did not fire it ,few of the cases had stretched quiet a but.
We had a bright moon in which the roos don't sit well.
When they sit they need to be facing correctly for a garenteed humane kill .
Long shots should realy only be taken when the roo is facing away from you so if you misscalculate bullet drop it hits the spine.
Roos facing you are a dodgy . shot to take as the balistic tip can hit the nose and not reach the brain ,you can do a chest shot and hit the heart but that is seldome a instant kill.
Balistic tips are a good choice for head shots on a roo because of how small there brain is ,plus less chance of richosha's in padochs that generaly have stock in them.
Heart shots are good untill you get confidents in your equipment then move on to head shots ,
Benifit of head shots are a miss is generally a clean miss ,except for the nose so shooting towards the back of the head is prefered.
Heart shots hold the danger of hitting an arm.
It is important with heart shots to be aware of there arms.
They can be hard to see because of the fur colours.
You get to no when a roo is going to sit,on a night when they don't sit well it can get hard not to rush a shot because you are expecting them to move on.
Roos are fast they cover a lot of ground quickly and they can go a long way at a fast pace.

One thing you might find interesting about there behaiver is they seldom jump a fence.
Roos go under a fence by choice,it is amazing the quality fencing they will ruin ,it is mind boggeling the small opening a roo can get under ,watching a 6 ft roo slip under a fence is a sight.
Some times you come accross roos that have tried to jump a fence and have got tangeled,it is a ugly sad death.
Were I am shooting roos it is very steep rocky country ,the speed roos can get up to down steep slopes is amazing ,they just lean forward and bounce HARD ,how they can manage such steep country so well with there big feet is awsom.
Climbing in and out of deep dry creek ravines ,weaving through trees .
It would be an interesting race between a deer and a roo.
 

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I didn't know Australia had camels, John. Do you eat them if you kill them? Or are they just to be culled?
 

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Stretch I am surprised you did not hear about Australia comiting camelside we coped a big attack from PETA,our media showed comady shows and news reports in America ,condeming us for commiting Camelside as it was called.
They were brought over as transport .
They played a key role in opening remote parts of australia for settelment.
There was even a much publisized race between horse and camel to prove which was better in the early days ,I think the horse one but died due to exhaustion.
5 years ago I was shown were the worlds fatest camel lived in Victoria ,not far from my house.

They have caused massive damege in our fragile desert echo systems ,experts say that there are patches up to a million acres that will never recover.
Believe it or not they do so well in our deserts they die of obiesaty before they die of old age, it is horafying to think how much folliage it takes to make a camell die from obesity ,exspecialy when they are eating bushes that can take 100 years to get 3-4 ft tall.
There must be millions of native critters that have died of to starvation because of them.
They can cause huge problems for farmers .
I have been wanting to do my bit and shoot some with my 338/378.
I watched a documentry on landline awhile ago about farmers going broke because of them.
Apart from the typical half botched culling from the goverment I am not aware of much going on .
I presume the locals are culling them.

I am interest to here what Jhon's reply is to what is going on as far as meat trade.
Lots of meat on a fat camel ,but it would be hard to harvest them when they are in such remote area's.
 

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So many things could be said about that,but on a more seriose note I heard that was because there's been to much inbreading due to allah not caring about the dady and daughter camels humping.
Shreck, that is just wrong on so many levels! :eek:
 

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Bit of a hard thing say in a politicaly correct fashion(not that I tried :) ) but breading practises are suposed to be the reason and the reasons for the breeding practices were religios.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I find your hunting to be interesting. If you were ever to get up to SW Colorado here in the states I would be glad to show you around. If you wanted to go hunting here I have a supply of good riles for you to use. No need to pack one up here. As one hunter to another I wish you the very best.
THanks for the offer mate, I do have a plan t get back over there at some point. Not too sure when though.
JD
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I didn't know Australia had camels, John. Do you eat them if you kill them? Or are they just to be culled?
G'Day Larry,
They are quite edible and some are shot for meat, but the majority are shot for pet meat, and some are just shot and left, depending who's doing the shooting. I was on a big station over in Western Australia, on the western end of Gunbarrel Highway. The camels had pushed over windmills and torn out kilometres of fences. We drove up over a big sand hill and it looked like a dinosaur graveyard, big skeletons everywhere.
The camels were used as beasts of burden for a long while in camel trains. They were also used to pull wagons. The camels did the job better than horses because of the dry climate. Some people have done a bit of camel catching, but it's tough work, and a bull camel is very dangerous. As Shrek said you don't need a permit to shoot them but you do need the permission of the station owner. There's not a lot of stations out there much less than a million square Kilometres.
Cheers mate,
John
 

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Discussion Starter #18
G'day Shreck,
Last I heard about the business of selling the camels to the Arabs was that they wanted them but didn't want to pay enough to make catching them worthwhile. So I guess that until someone invents a camel trap, we'll just have to keep shooting them. I've seen plenty while I've been over in the Gibson and Great Sandy but never shot one. My 9.3 would handle it OK. One of the stations I was on over in WA the ringers (cowboys) were licensed to carry a 44 magnum because they were using bikes to muster cattle, they could chase a camel in shoot it at close range, but mostly it was for defence against the bull camels. You know how stirry they get when the cows are in the mood..
JD
 
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