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Model 7 and the M600 series has long shrouds. Has anybody got a M700 that looks different than this one?

The cocking piece, which is pinned tightly to the firing pin is protruding .056 without even a trigger in the action. It never goes below the level of the shroud. Neither did the new M700ML pictured on their web page.
Where is the confusion? It IS important!
Yes, I have one, a 700 DG 375HH magnum XP. The firing pin comes not quite flush and protected by the shroud when cocked and does NOT protrude. I suggest yours may needs looking at? Was the bolt ever disassembled? And here I am talking to a gun smith, heh.
 

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I don't get the empty chamber thing either. I'm on a CCW forum and once in a while folks will say they carry with an empty chamber. To me this is ridiculous.
Some people are snowflakes. It's either that or they don't trust themselves. Got to admit, it seems like all the rage now for people to forget the basics and common sense. Heck......we know it's not taught in schools anymore.
 

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The guy in the picture is no doubt a actor/model, probably all photo shopped in a studio maybe even CGI.
 

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Yes, I have one, a 700 DG 375HH magnum XP. The firing pin comes not quite flush and protected by the shroud when cocked and does NOT protrude. I suggest yours may needs looking at? Was the bolt ever disassembled? And here I am talking to a gun smith, heh.
My guess it's a very old 700, the predecessor to the 700's the 721 and 722 had those shrouds.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Here are a few (crappy!) pictures. Sorry, I may have to try and take them in daylight. Phone camera isn't that great.... had to fiddle with the contrast to be able see anything at all.

Anyway.... model 700, 6.5 million range, maybe 1972 if I am reading the barrel codes right. Had the original Walker trigger in it, still sealed, and the safety locked the bolt. Somewhere in that information, maybe, folks can confirm when it was made.

Note that it is a SHORT action... not sure if that has anything to do with it. When the bolt is cocked, the striker just barely is proud of it. When the bolt is let down with the trigger held back, the back of the striker is about 0.220" recessed from the back of the shroud.
 

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Know your Remington bolts

From left to right.
Current production 700 short action bolt
Model 7 bolt{stainless}
Late 80's production 700ML {muzzleloader} and retention screw
Aftermarket lightweight shroud made by Jim Sinclair for benchrest guns{aluminum and short}
Remington 40X rimfire bolt 1989, notice where the locking lugs are and the short shroud.
Mid 90's XP-100 bolt, obvious because of the dogleg bolt handle.




Kleinedorst Remington bolt tools, top one removes the firing pin assembly from the bolt body in seconds
Bottom one is for changing the pin and or spring
Center is a titanium firing pin with a Wolff extra power spring, super light and takes an already fast lock time to a new level in the 700, makes other lock times seem like flintlocks.
Because of the popularity of the 700 there's lots of neat tools and accessories for them, I have most of them!
I looked at different vintage 700's tonight and there has been very slight changes in the shrouds from the early 80's up until now, one of mine sits nearly flush when cocked, I don't know the year it was made because it was a used donor gun I bought for a wildcat.
None of them protrude beyond the cocking piece like Mike's gun, must have been a short lived variation.

 

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Nope. My 375 HH DG Remington 700 was in a special run, 500 made. Quite recently. I have to look into the shroud to see if it is cocked. Not far mind you, but it does NOT protrude.
I was referring to the one in JBelks picture, my mistake.
 

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I hunt with a Ruger #1 so I have shell in the chamber safe on. If I'm stalking or sitting in a stand I still always have the safe on. I used to hunt with a Marlin 336 no cross bolt safety. I just had the rifle on half cock. The main thing is to keep the rifle pointed in a safe direction at all times and pay attention to what your doing.
 

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So much about keeping the muzzle pointed in a safe condition is out of the hunters control. A safety of any kind can fail if struck, and hunting rifle can be kicked, fall of your shoulder or out of your hand or off a saddle horse etc. I suppose if a person hunts on their own it is less of an issue but hunting within a group it is ,imo. I simply won't risk it if the chances are miniscule that anything will happen . I also tried the Ruger#1 as a elk and sheep rifle and was disappointed and sold it.The rifle was great to carry but added an extra step for me because it had no magazine-I chambered a round when needed and this sometimes wasn't a smooth action (on my part). I did not trust the tang safety on this rifle. This is my experience,and I thought it is a good time to voice this.Within the conditions I hunt in, a round in the chamber is an unsafe practice . This is just how I see things,folks.
 

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A safety of any kind can fail if struck
Not really. That depends entirely on the safety.

FWIW-- The Ruger Number One has one of the best safeties on earth. It's MORE positive and works much the same way as a 1911 Colt.

Many years ago, I put a 'locking button' on two Ruger Number Ones for a guy in Texas. The safety button had a spring-loaded button on top that had to be depressed before the safety would unlock. The safeties were also inletted into the top tang so the front of the safety didn't stop the ejecting shell casing. Those are probably the two safest "kinetic" guns ever made.
 

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All in all anything a person does has some inherent risk. Hang gliding or bungee jumping or racing motorcycles even crossing the street to get your mail has risks. We just try to minimize it the best we can.
 

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Not really. That depends entirely on the safety.

FWIW-- The Ruger Number One has one of the best safeties on earth. It's MORE positive and works much the same way as a 1911 Colt.

Many years ago, I put a 'locking button' on two Ruger Number Ones for a guy in Texas. The safety button had a spring-loaded button on top that had to be depressed before the safety would unlock. The safeties were also inletted into the top tang so the front of the safety didn't stop the ejecting shell casing. Those are probably the two safest "kinetic" guns ever made.
Thats good news to me on the #1 safety!

After your modification to #1 safeties, could they still be operated with gloves on?
Do you have any photos of the finished product?
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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I have been hunting with one in the chamber since 1963. No problem yet.
 

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So much about keeping the muzzle pointed in a safe condition is out of the hunters control. A safety of any kind can fail if struck, and hunting rifle can be kicked, fall of your shoulder or out of your hand or off a saddle horse etc. I suppose if a person hunts on their own it is less of an issue but hunting within a group it is ,imo. I simply won't risk it if the chances are miniscule that anything will happen . I also tried the Ruger#1 as a elk and sheep rifle and was disappointed and sold it.The rifle was great to carry but added an extra step for me because it had no magazine-I chambered a round when needed and this sometimes wasn't a smooth action (on my part). I did not trust the tang safety on this rifle. This is my experience,and I thought it is a good time to voice this.Within the conditions I hunt in, a round in the chamber is an unsafe practice . This is just how I see things,folks.
And I agree 100%, hunters that tell you they've never fallen, never dropped there gun or never accidentally disengaged the safety are simply not telling the truth.
The red herring in this discussion is that there isn't time once game is spotted, I doubt seriously that people arguing for loaded chambers jerk the rifle to there shoulder and snap shoot like you would a shotgun mainly because they can't shoot good enough offhand to make a shot anyway which means they have to find a rest somewhere be it carried with them or a part of the fauna or whatever. During that process even the most uncoordinated person can manage to get a cartridge in the chamber.
Guys that hunt driven game in the south and other places would obviously not be included in this although there probably using shotguns anyway.

I would add this, if your taking a person hunting for there first time, or a person you don't know what there gun safety is like or there a paying guest the last thing you want to have happen is for you to have to give them a heated safety lecture when they accidentally point a loaded gun at you which is why I don't let anyone hunting with me chamber a cartridge until I give the go ahead! Then the gun is promptly made safe again after the shot or the opportunity passes.
Keep in mind I learned gun safety beginning at shooting tournaments when I was a teenager through 30 years, big difference as compared to 1 hour hunter safety courses or pamphlets included in gun boxes, yea, like real gun safety.
Guys that learned safe gun handling in the military are generally pretty good but as time goes on even some of them tend to become careless.
 

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After your modification to #1 safeties, could they still be operated with gloves on?
Do you have any photos of the finished product?
Yes on the gloves. The button can be any dimension. The ones I did duplicated what is seen on drillings quite often and is the barrel switching mechanism that usually also raises the rear sight.

Here's a barrel selector with locking button on a Kreighoff drilling. The safety is the Greener side safety.

I was shooting a friend's 20x20x222 Rem. Geiger and Sohn Drilling on a deer hunt one time in Florida. Wood Ducks started flushing from a small cypress pond so I decided to take one since I had a shotgun in my hands..... I dead centered a departing drake with the .222 when I just automatically pushed the 'safety' forward like I'd done for about 20 years at that time on every gun with top tang safety I'd handled.

10th Commandment.

I knew how that gun worked but 'training' took over when game was flushing. It's one of our human foibles.

Notice there are three cocking indicators on the top tang. The two outer ones are showing the gun's shotgun barrels are fired but the center one indicates the rifle barrel is still cocked.
 

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Usually one in the pipe, with the safety on.
Unless it's the Marlin lever action, in which
case, it's one on the pipe with the hammer down.
 

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All in all anything a person does has some inherent risk. Hang gliding or bungee jumping or racing motorcycles even crossing the street to get your mail has risks. We just try to minimize it the best we can.
I doubt anyone on here hand glides, bungee jumps and maybe a few race motorcycles, for the most part those activities if done in an unsafe manner won't result in anyone but yourself dead.
Walking across the street to get your mail is hardly analogous to carrying a loaded weapon around with a cartridge in the chamber, safety or no safety. Your mailmans not going to end up dead if you trip going over to talk to him.
As far as trying to "minimize it the best we can" carrying around a loaded in the chamber sporting weapon is not doing the best you can.
Going with the assumption that you believe your just to slow or uncoordinated or you can't handle the stress to load your gun in time and need to carry one in the chamber do you then tell yourself, killing a deer or whatever you hunt is so important to me that I'm willing to risk killing someone that's hunting with me{or someone half a mile away} so that I can get that animal.
Now if your subsistence hunter living in the wilds of Alaska maybe you could get people to buy into that argument, if not I doubt anyone's going to take you seriously.
 

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I doubt anyone on here hand glides, bungee jumps and maybe a few race motorcycles, for the most part those activities if done in an unsafe manner won't result in anyone but yourself dead.
Walking across the street to get your mail is hardly analogous to carrying a loaded weapon around with a cartridge in the chamber, safety or no safety. Your mailmans not going to end up dead if you trip going over to talk to him.
As far as trying to "minimize it the best we can" carrying around a loaded in the chamber sporting weapon is not doing the best you can.
Going with the assumption that you believe your just to slow or uncoordinated or you can't handle the stress to load your gun in time and need to carry one in the chamber do you then tell yourself, killing a deer or whatever you hunt is so important to me that I'm willing to risk killing someone that's hunting with me{or someone half a mile away} so that I can get that animal.
Now if your subsistence hunter living in the wilds of Alaska maybe you could get people to buy into that argument, if not I doubt anyone's going to take you seriously.
This is a useful discussion,imo. Mule deer,Sheep,Elk and moose all have horn requirements,Goats should be Billy's and it is illegal to shoot at any one of a group of black or Grizzly bears in this region. It takes time to count points and assess horns etc.This leaves the boars as the intended game animal. I had a friend of mine who once was shot in the hand by hunter that didn't stop long enough discern that this was a man and not an animal.Every year hunters shoot range cattle by mistake too. Hunting has enough trouble with the anti's and we don't need any additional bad press or injuries. Even Rodeo cowboys reduce risk when they can- and these guys are depending on a trip to the pay window. Cheers
 
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