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Some do and some don't. Like everything else you either agree or disagree. I'm comfortable carrying with a round in the chamber as I carry everyday at work or on my time. Very few times are my guns unloaded like climbing a tree stand or jumping out of airplanes with them. Never seen a ND when troops fell and dropped their weapon. AD's on the other hand do happen as they become careless in clearing the gun and are distracted/complacent. I also keep gasoline in my vehicles when not driving, LOL.


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I will always carry a loaded and chambered firearm when hunting or concealed carry. If whatever I have is so dangerous I can't carry like that it's not worth carrying. Even a revolver has a "chambered round" when it's loaded. I like hunting with a bolt action and the Mauser safety is an excellent deterrent to it going off prematurely. You could probably throw that rifle down a rock slide and be certain that it wouldn't go off. But even then I would unload it to climb a tree or climb over a fence. Safety is always relevant to what is not safe and "feeling safe" is a mental disorder. You're never truly safe from anything.
 

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i hunt deer and bear. I do not hunt from blind or stand. When I am hunting through the woods I am alone. I always have one in the chamber.
 

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Some do and some don't. Like everything else you either agree or disagree. I'm comfortable carrying with a round in the chamber as I carry everyday at work or on my time. Very few times are my guns unloaded like climbing a tree stand or jumping out of airplanes with them. Never seen a ND when troops fell and dropped their weapon. AD's on the other hand do happen as they become careless in clearing the gun and are distracted/complacent. I also keep gasoline in my vehicles when not driving, LOL.


CD
Military service and war are totally different, everyone involved knows there's a risk of death.

Similarly lots of folks that hunt with rifles never touch a gun except during hunting seasons, yet during that time there constantly handling them.
Some of them may even be kids and women with very little gun handling experience, do you tell 12 year old first timers it's fine to have a cartridge in the chamber? I hope you wouldn't so at what age do you decide it's now safe for them, 16, 18, 21? What if they only go a couple of times a year with you? Is safe gun handling supposed to creep into there psyche by some magic process.

Those people are very different than concealed carry folks, they put a gun on and don't touch it typically until they take it off at night or when ever, it's in a purse or holster being carried by someone that has probably been through a class that included gun safety and the personal responsibility and legal ramifications of killing someone, they act very different with guns than your typical hunter.

And just for fun. Warning, there's bad language in this video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-Y-1iw_3JI
 

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Military service and war are totally different, everyone involved knows there's a risk of death.

Similarly lots of folks that hunt with rifles never touch a gun except during hunting seasons, yet during that time there constantly handling them.
Some of them may even be kids and women with very little gun handling experience, do you tell 12 year old first timers it's fine to have a cartridge in the chamber? I hope you wouldn't so at what age do you decide it's now safe for them, 16, 18, 21? What if they only go a couple of times a year with you? Is safe gun handling supposed to creep into there psyche by some magic process.

Those people are very different than concealed carry folks, they put a gun on and don't touch it typically until they take it off at night or when ever, it's in a purse or holster being carried by someone that has probably been through a class that included gun safety and the personal responsibility and legal ramifications of killing someone, they act very different with guns than your typical hunter.

And just for fun. Warning, there's bad language in this video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-Y-1iw_3JI
What would you do? Mandate that folks must hunt with an empty chamber?
 

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Military service and war are totally different, everyone involved knows there's a risk of death.

Similarly lots of folks that hunt with rifles never touch a gun except during hunting seasons, yet during that time there constantly handling them.
Some of them may even be kids and women with very little gun handling experience, do you tell 12 year old first timers it's fine to have a cartridge in the chamber? I hope you wouldn't so at what age do you decide it's now safe for them, 16, 18, 21? What if they only go a couple of times a year with you? Is safe gun handling supposed to creep into there psyche by some magic process.

Those people are very different than concealed carry folks, they put a gun on and don't touch it typically until they take it off at night or when ever, it's in a purse or holster being carried by someone that has probably been through a class that included gun safety and the personal responsibility and legal ramifications of killing someone, they act very different with guns than your typical hunter.

And just for fun. Warning, there's bad language in this video.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-Y-1iw_3JI
No matter the age, training is peramount. Lots of support troops that don't have the same background except few times on the range in their careers. Its all about training with comes with experience and giving the resposiblity to handle loaded firearms.


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To Joe, no, I'm a libertarian at heart, I want to people to see the error in there ways and change on there own.

Military training is very different than training civilians, don't know if the army still does it but they used to tell first timers on the rifle range if they violated the 180 degree rule they would be shot.
That streamlines the education process by a good bit.
 

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Yeah it only takes a few conscripts being made an example of .... :eek:

One thing to keep in mind is that the armed forces of the world are generally intolerant of things like safeties not actually working. There are a few - very few - examples of military guns without effective safties, or none at all (French MAS 1935?). Also the safety of the Mosin-Nagant is about impossible to use, but I think that the Russians solved that problem by not really issuing ammo all that often....
 

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To Joe, no, I'm a libertarian at heart, I want to people to see the error in there ways and change on there own.

Military training is very different than training civilians, don't know if the army still does it but they used to tell first timers on the rifle range if they violated the 180 degree rule they would be shot.
That streamlines the education process by a good bit.
This blog is about HUNTING with a round in the chamber. In my state BEFORE you can hunt, you are required to take two days of gun safety training. This includes firing them, clearing them and transferring them from person to person. The videos presented are chilling. They strongly suggest you should unload your firearm when crossing obstructions. They do NOT suggest you HUNT without a round in the chamber.

And, we don't need political views on here unless you want an argument.
 

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This blog is about HUNTING with a round in the chamber. In my state BEFORE you can hunt, you are required to take two days of gun safety training. This includes firing them, clearing them and transferring them from person to person. The videos presented are chilling. They strongly suggest you should unload your firearm when crossing obstructions. They do NOT suggest you HUNT without a round in the chamber.

And, we don't need political views on here unless you want an argument.
Political views? I merely state the doctrine of my party and your upset. Someone else brought up changing laws btw, that's done through the political process or it's supposed to be anyway.
 

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...

Similarly lots of folks that hunt with rifles never touch a gun except during hunting seasons, yet during that time there (they're) constantly handling them.
Some of them may even be kids and women with very little gun handling experience, do you tell 12 year old first timers it's fine to have a cartridge in the chamber? I hope you wouldn't so at what age do you decide it's now safe for them, 16, 18, 21? What if they only go a couple of times a year with you? Is safe gun handling supposed to creep into there (their) psyche by some magic process. (?)

...
Once again you are making BROAD generalizations about the hunting public, labeling people you don't even know with claims that are unfounded and baseless! I could go into a bunch of detail here, but I'll make it plain and simple: Hunter safety programs and good mentors make safe hunters! Look at the statistics in pretty much every state over the last 50 years, or so, since those programs were put in place...hunting related accidents are fewer and fewer, each year.

As for youth hunters, have you ever introduced one to the sport? If so, weren't you right there beside them, helping them avoid mistakes? To answer your question: Once I was in the blind or stand with the three youth hunters I've introduced to hunting, yes...I had them chamber a round. Why? Because we were HUNTING! They had already demonstrated safe gun handling and shooting practices at the range, numerous times, or they wouldn't be out there! With my guidance, they had a very good experience, harvested game and never even came close to an inadvertent discharge of a gun.

If you feel strongly that a round shouldn't be chambered while hunting, then don't do so, but at the same time, do not sit back and pass judgement on those who hunt differently than you do. If you're going to make claims about other practices being unsafe, at least attempt to substantiate that with something other than one-off stupidity.
 

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I have never hunted from a stand,my hunting is off road climbing over ,under around and up things.We move from vantage point to vantage point and always have a sweat on .Climbing and hunting the Rockies is like that. I fall down drop things regularly and also worked as a Big Game Guide for quite a while and always insisted the client did not keep a round in the chamber because at times I looked down the barrel of his rifle -manipulating rough terrain. It is even quite easy to lift the bolt in a tangle and not know it and disengage the safety too. Rifles can be quite different but there is no advantage in keeping one chambered,imo.
 

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Once again you are making BROAD generalizations about the hunting public, labeling people you don't even know with claims that are unfounded and baseless! I could go into a bunch of detail here, but I'll make it plain and simple: Hunter safety programs and good mentors make safe hunters! Look at the statistics in pretty much every state over the last 50 years, or so, since those programs were put in place...hunting related accidents are fewer and fewer, each year.

As for youth hunters, have you ever introduced one to the sport? If so, weren't you right there beside them, helping them avoid mistakes? To answer your question: Once I was in the blind or stand with the three youth hunters I've introduced to hunting, yes...I had them chamber a round. Why? Because we were HUNTING! They had already demonstrated safe gun handling and shooting practices at the range, numerous times, or they wouldn't be out there! With my guidance, they had a very good experience, harvested game and never even came close to an inadvertent discharge of a gun.

If you feel strongly that a round shouldn't be chambered while hunting, then don't do so, but at the same time, do not sit back and pass judgement on those who hunt differently than you do. If you're going to make claims about other practices being unsafe, at least attempt to substantiate that with something other than one-off stupidity.
I was a YHEC instructor for over 10 years, taught lots of adults the shooting sports and run my own hunting club for 18 years, probably spent more time teaching safe gun handling in different environments than anyone on here.
Had plenty of incidents where guns were pointed at me but the chambers were empty.
What gets me is people that get all preachy about gun safety when an incident occurs to someone else but when asked about there handling get defensive about something as simple and effective as having an unloaded chamber until your ready to shoot.
Honestly I don't care what you do but remember this conversation next time you read about someone being accidentally shot and ask yourself if it could have been prevented by having more than one layer of safety.
 

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Santimonious

"I was a YHEC instructor for over 10 years," Teaching safety, yet to hunt the wrong way perhaps.

So I have been hunting since I was 10. That was 56 years ago, and yes long before the hunter safety program. I remember way back in my second or third year when walking to a stand, I saw a buck sleeping. Glory! He spotted me and rose. I aimed the 3030, cocked and fired. Well I pulled on an empty chamber. So a young hunter learned the hard way. You must be READY.

Teach your gullible hunters one thing, and they will soon draw their own conclusions.
 

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If you are hunting alone it's ok but if hunting with a partner or group only the lead hunter could have a round in the chamber the rest behind should not . I will not walk in front of anyone who has a round in the chamber it's too easy for a safety to slip off accidentally or get brushed on bushes or pack straps etc. Seen two accidental discharges ( not mine ) and it is scary .
 

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It has been said many, many times that the 'no loaded guns in vehicles' is to stop road hunting, not improved safety.
 
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It has been said many, many times that the 'no loaded guns in vehicles' is to stop road hunting, not improved safety.
I may not agree with this BUT ever since Oregon went to a no round in the chamber IN VEHICLES NDs have dropped off dramatically (in vehicles)
 

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NO DOUBT, accident rates have plummeted since the loaded in vehicle laws were enacted. I was commenting on why the laws were lobbied for by wildlife agencies to start with. It was not in the interest of safety but to give reason to stop a car or truck that seemed to be road hunting.

Ref. "Wakeup Call to Florida Sportsmen" by Raymond Hamlin, Jr. Hamlin was a staunch Constitutional sheriff and blew a bugle call to sportsmen about the extra-Constitutional laws pressed by wildlife officials. Many wildlife laws and regulations are un-Constitutional and the loaded firearms law is one of them.
 

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It was not in the interest of safety but to give reason to stop a car or truck that seemed to be road hunting.
No doubt this WAS the reason as chambering a round in a vehicle will most likely result in a missed shot - if from a vehicle or trying to clamber out of it for a shot. Heck with the amount of poaching that takes place from either a vehicle or otherwise I doubt the few animals that WERE shot from vehicles by tag holding people TRYING to be 'somewhat' legal didn't even create a 'blip' on the radar screen!
 
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