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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was given a Husqvarna 1600 6.5x55 as my first hunting rifle, I am trying to find out what it actually is (age and details) it has a black synthetic stock, crown stamps in many locations in and around the action, and on the rear site. It also has the number 771 stamped in the bolt handle. I have spent several hours trying to research this piece and have had little luck.

I am not sure how to load a picture to this forum but the link below contains a photo I found online that looks identical to the rifle I have.

http://www.huntingbc.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=23548

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Tyler
 

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I own a Smith & Wesson Model "B" in .308 that was made for S&W by Husqvarna. My rifle was made back in 1968 or around that date.
 

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I was given a Husqvarna 1600 6.5x55 as my first hunting rifle, I am trying to find out what it actually is (age and details) to the best of my knowledge it is Post 1980. It has a black synthetic stock, crown stamps in many locations in and around the action, and on the rear site. It also has the number 771 stamped in the bolt handle. I have spent several hours trying to research this piece and have had little luck.

I am not sure how to load a picture to this forum but the link below contains a photo I found online that looks identical to the rifle I have.

http://www.huntingbc.ca/forum/showthread.php?t=23548

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Tyler

Here's some additional info that should help you understand that nice rifle! Looks like the rifle is older than the 1980s and was built as a commercial Mauser action and was re-stocked. I happen to own a model 4100 Husqvarna in .270 (made from 1954 to 1972) and it is also one very sweet rifle. Here's a couple of bits of info from some other sites:

Wikipedia:

Civilian weapons
Husqvarna made numerous types and models of break action shotguns.

The first medium caliber bolt action rifles used the same action as the Swedish Army's Mauser m/96. This type was manufactured from 1927 to 1942 circa, known as the Model 46 and mostly chambered in 6.5x55, 9.3x57 and 9.3x62 mm.

After WW2 Husqvarna started purchasing Mauser M98 actions from the Belgian company FN, labeling the rifles Model 146, 246 and 640. Though the M98 was a strong and well proven action, it was not an ideal situation for Husqvarna to be depending on one of its worst competitors for such a key component.

An independent bolt action design was introduced in 1953 as the 1600-series, which was available in several European and American chamberings, including 9.3x62, .270, 30-06; 8x57, 6.5x55, and others.

With the army order for the Ak 4 the company was able to find the funding to re-tool the workshop to produce a newly developed bolt action, marketed in 1967 as the 1900-series and continued by FFV well into the 1980s.

Husqvarna also built a limited number of an elegant double rifle in caliber 9.3x74R, the model 410.


Another comment here from another forum:


Husqvarna Model 1600 series Rifles

The Swedish Husqvarna Model 1600 series rifle was built around a redesigned Mauser type action. The bolts retain the military style full length claw type extractor and three locking lugs. These commercial rifles were manufactured from approx. 1953 to 1967. The 1600 series rifles show the same high quality of manufacture as Swedish Military Mausers. To facilitate scope mounting, each rifle came from the factory with a turned down/swept back bolt handle, side mount safety, and drilled and tapped for Weaver bases. They are also drilled and tapped on the right rear of the receiver for peep sights and have an easy to operate button in the triggerguard for floorplate release. All have beautiful wood with checkering where needed, nice bluing as noted, and all bores have been conservatively graded for wear of rifling and groove condition. Instead of tearing apart military rifle and spending lots of money to build a sporter, or buying a cheap XMart, plastic stocked hunting rifle, you can buy one of these high quality rifles for hunting, target practice, or as a collectible.
 

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I wouln't worry about reloading that Husky .I would just maybe have the trigger tuned abit and go out to the range . The 6.5 is a light recoiling round, excellent to fine tune your shooting skills and great for deer type game . Use some of the premium 140 gr bullets for the larger , but for deer all you need is the standard cup and cone .

Just work up to a Max load as each rifle is indeed different .
One of the slow powders suitable for the Odd 6 seemed to work best for me using the 140 gr. bullet . Going Hunting then just make sure your knife is sharp .
 

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The Swedish Husqvarna Model 1600 series rifle was built around a redesigned Mauser type action. The bolts retain the military style full length claw type extractor and three locking lugs.
TnHunter, you've provided a wealth of information in your post that is greatly appreciated. The Husqvarna rifles are of excellent quality that any shooter should be proud to own.

However, the Mauser actions do not have three locking lugs. They have two locking lugs and a safety lug that contacts nothing unless the front lugs began to set back. In that case the safety lug acts to protect the shooter. The first effort by Mauser to provide extra safety was a safety "bar" (for want of a better term) behind the bolt handle root on the 1895 Mauser. A safe 1895 will have a small but easily seen gap between the bolt handle and the bar. The safety lug on the 1898 Mauser was a much improved design and far stronger design.

The picture below of an 1895 Mauser bolt has the safety bar circled. The gap is obvious.

 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you all for the advice, I did go to have this rifle appraised, it turns out aftrer WW2 these rifles were being sold for $15-$25. A lot of these were reconfigred to the owners desire. I had 2 diferent gunsmiths look at it and walked away with the same story, that it holds no value to them (not that I want to sell it) and that they would not be interested in it. I was not expecting the reply I recieved but either way I will hang on to it for keep sakes, I did get my first deer with it...
 

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This rifle then would not be a Model 96 or a 38 Husquarna??
They were imported 15/ 20 years ago at slightly over 20 dollars , but try to buy one now for five times that .

A lot of these old military rifles are dated from 1900 /1945 and came with 29 " barrels for the older model 96, where the model 38 was more to the 24 inch. The model 38 could be bought with or without the turned down bolt . Barrels overal were of good shape. Many also had dark bores and worn rifling. You needed to look throught the pile .
Many of these rifles were customized with new triggger assembly's , restocked and rebarreled as the actions though cheap were strong suitable for rebarreling.The Swede had used excellant steel.

Now the supply of these rifles are drying up, so a complete rifle as issued can fetch 400.00 depending on model and condition .

I had a Husq. model 38 with a bold trigger , drilled and taped for scope and it was a good shooter .
The 6.5 is known to buck the wind very well and is also an excellent fox / wolf , and deer gun , limited only with what your loading .
Overal the 120/140 gr bullets seem to be excellent for deer , while if you come across the 139 Hard points they do well at the range .

Any way do buy into the statement - these are 15/20 dollar rifles . With a washed barrel and spite wood the action is still worth a lot more .
If one could buy a rifle today for 25/50 dollars I sure bring a few hundred with me to sort through the pile.:)
Enjoy it while you can.
 

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Mr. Snippe has given you some very useful information there. You mentioned that your rifle was indeed a Husky 1600. Is that stamped on it anywhere? The military Mausers originally produced in 6.5x55 are far, as already mentioned, from "cheap" rifles. The m96 was at one time sporterized by Kimber. Yes, that Kimber (original Kimber of Or.). They kept the original 6.5x55 barreled actions on those with good bores and rechambered/barreled others and installed Ram-Line stocks on them. Some were nickel plated (not SS as sometimes said). I owned one of the 6.5 versions, barrel steps removed and cut to 22". To say it was a good shooter would have been a vast understatement as this rifle was as accurate as any I've ever owned, even with the military two stage trigger. Either way, your rifle is a very well made one and chambered in a very useful cartridge. Ain't that what we are all lookin' for?:D
 

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The name and model production date is stamped on the top of the outward reciver ring , unless some one has drilled the rifle for a scope .The barrels had three steps unless it has been replaced with a aftermarket barrel or turned down.
Should never ever sold mine !!
Always wondered How well a Model 96 Husqvarna would do in a factory issue 3006.
Yeah! they were even chambered in 9.3x62.
They were known to be good strong smooth operating actions .
 
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