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Discussion Starter #1
I have a tang site to go on my Winchester 1886. Need to find a machinest to do some drilling and tapping. My Rossi copy of the Winchester 1892 has a cheap trashy buck horn site that would serve a better purpose as land fill. I think Marples makes a tang site for it.
I, however, think a tang site on a rifle shooting a pistol cartridge is sort of pretentious. Anybody got some suggestions on what other site I could use that would be acceptable to the Cowboys?
Jim
 

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Jim,

I couldn't agree more about the tang sight on your Rossi 92.  I have, in the past drilled and tapped them for the classic Lyman receiver sights... usually I find them relatively cheap at gun shows used.  (Williams will work well too, but I don't know about the vintage authenticity... probably out the window unless Lyman or Redfield) They are vintage but don't know how they conform to rules of cowboy shooting!   They sure do work slick however... such an improvement over the Rossi excuse for sights!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Discussion Starter #3
There's a buckhorn-ladder site in the Dillion catalog that looks mighty interesting. I'll ponder that while I work up some loads for this little rifle.
I cannot thank you enough for replying. I may check out some of the other buckhorn and semi buckhorn sites I've seen around.
Again thanks.
Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I did buy and install that ladder/buckhorn site I found in the Dillion catalog. It works much better then the factory junk.
The buckhorn part of this site is, maybe, 1/4 inch thick with and itty bitty V shaped groove to aim through. It crossed my mind to have a machinist to mill a U shaped channel in the front/target side to deduce the thickness and allow more light. The metal on my side of the site will remain the same. Then maybe widen the narrow V groove to a U shape or go to a Square shape like all my pistols have.
Anybody got some in put on this?
Jim
 

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Just a thought:  Why not eliminate the notch in the bottom of the buckhorn sight and maybe thin the "wings" out.  Then install a taller front sight and use it like a barrel mounted ghost ring sight.  The Japanese used a barrel mounted peep on some of their rifles in WWII.  There is a black powder underhammer rifle manufacturer in CA that also uses a peep type buckhorn hybrid sight - the company name excapes me at the moment.  This might be the answer for post-40 bifocal wearers in cowboy action shooting!

Note: The Pacific Rifle Company markets a .62 & 72 caliber underhammer and one of the sight options is the "Peep Horn"
- sort of a barrel mounted peep sight with an open gap at the top of the peep sight.

(Edited by Ralph McLaney at 9<!--emo&:0--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':0'><!--endemo-->1 pm on Oct. 19, 2001)
 

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Go to the Brownell's web sight and look at all the sights they offer.
I suggest the Marbles fold down flat top open sight that is adjustable for windage and elevation.
I have three of these on various Winchester Big Bores and they work well as back ups.
I wish Williams still made the copy of the Redfield Sourdough front sight, it had a good square post with colored insert, at a very good price.
 

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Before you rule it out, try a tang.  Just use the stock tang screw hole and put some tape on the gun so it doesn't mark it up for a temporary trial.  I put a Lyman on my Marlin and love it.  I intended just using it at longer distances, but without any insert I use it as a ghost ring for up close stuff and it's fast, works great, and looks genuine real old timey, to me anyway.  The Marbles has clicks, but the Lyman is a WHOLE bunch cheaper, like $57 versus $125 from Mid South.
 

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Gentlemen,

I was reading this point as referring to the quality of the factory buckhorn sight, and then realized that some were missing the point of buckhorn sights.  Buckhorn sights were developed so you have two aiming points:  Short range in the lower notch and a longer range at the "buckhorn."  They are especially effective with pistol cartridge rifles.

There is a reason that there were so many of them installed, other than to irritate the current buyers and make money for the sight companies.

dclark
 

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dclark: right you are but- when you buy a sight that incorporates a flip up ladder what is the point of the buckhorn? Used without a ladder the buckhorn has some validity provided you know what range the gap at the tip of the horns zeros at. I've looked at those sights and immediately started determining whether or not they could be cut back to either level or shallow V. They can and unless you are a stickler for tradition I would.
 

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A good combo that works on my 1886 is a Smith Enterprise (smithenterprise.com) buckhorn/ladder, and a Tedd Cash front blade sight (Thunder Ridge Muzzleloading).  The picture is easy, compatible and vintage.  I hate beads with a buckhorn.
 
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