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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a stuck breech plug and can't get it out. I've had this rifle for 20 years and never had this happen. Tried to get it out Yesterday. I thought of maybe plugging breech plug and pouring some Kroil down it and standing it up for a few days. Any advice?
 

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A good soak in Kroil may help if it can penetrate the rust. Assuming yours is an octagon barrel, put it in a vise with wood blocks to protect the barrel and hold it in place. Now heat the outside of the barrel with a torch good and hot. Not glowing, but hot. Now try to break it free with your wrench. Don't be afraid to give it a yank, those are tough threads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No it's a round barrel CVA inline. But, I will try the Kroil for a few days.
 

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Oil and heat are your friends. If you can drill a hole that is slightly smaller than bore size through a couple of pieces of wood that are clamped together in the vise (with the parting line between them being the middle of the hole, then you may be able to make some clamping blocks that will help hold the barrel. Some resin will help.

Clamp the barrel in the vise in the wood blocks as tight as you can after soaking it for a few days, then get it warm, then get the wrench on it. Give the wrench a light tap with a hammer and see if the helps. Sometimes a bit of impact helps.

Good luck.
 

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If you have a socket that fits the plug, use it with a long handle for leverage. I'd first remove forend and barrel from the receiver, and after reinstalling the forend you should be able to pad and clamp the barrel with forend firmly.

A couple of taps with a hammer to the back of the breech plug or socket before installing the ratchet wouldn't hurt either.

Good luck 👍
 

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Drizzle some Kroil down the bore so it puddle on the plug. Heat the butt of the barrel SLOWLY with a propane torch until juice comes from the threads. It should turn right out.
 

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Should NOT be the case for CVA….but do remember other imports that used a threaded plug that got spot welded in place. No idea why, were threaded and the threads seemed tight. Were usually cheap India (or some unidentified nation) copies….pretty crappy.

Heat is your friend here...so long as you are 100% sure it’s an empty barrel. Tend to heat the barrel about 2-3” ahead of the plug, (not so much as to discolor the finish) so the barrel expands more than the plug,,give it a dose of penetrating oil. Repeat if needed, but eventually the oil works it way down into the threads and the plug will come out.

A little vibration can help the oil getting into the threads. My go-to is a vibration sander without the sand paper.
 

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Kroil is a popular brand, but dumb old Liquid Wrench has beaten it in at least one online test. In this situation, though, I would drizzle Gunzilla down into the upright barrel and let it sit for a week. Gunzilla is one of the most effective rust looseners I've run into. I have placed rusty parts in a small cup of it and let it sit for a week or two and at the end of that time found the rust off the part and lying in the bottom of the cup, having simply fallen off the steel. You just need to give it time to work. I've experimented with adding a small amount of tea nut tree oil to it (about 10% by volume) and get it to wick out across a sandblasted surface faster and with more reach, but I'm not sure all the constituents are being carried in the wicking, so this should be considered experimental. Some machinists swear by wintergreen oil as a penetrant, too. And Gunzilla itself is a vegetable oil-based product. Plants seem to produce a lot of good penetrators. The tea nut tree oil (not to be confused with tea nut oil; "tree" has to be in the name) is a good penetrant. The scent is a bit much. The tree is in the camphor family, so its vapors are strong and kill molds (one of its uses).

Once the penetrating is done, apply a little rosin to the barrel and wrap some cloth rags around it for a grip and apply a pneumatic impact wrench to the hex head on the plug. I suspect that will get it out without a potentially finish-damaging death grip on the barrel. I remember one time my neighbor was struggling to take the flywheel off the top of his outboard motor. It was recessed in the motor housing, so he wasn't able to get anything to hold onto the wheel hard enough that his crescent wrench didn't just turn the whole thing or else just not turn at all. I had a small portable air tank and pneumatic impact wrench, so I carried both over, placed the wrench over the stuck nut, and without anything hanging onto the flywheel, zipped the nut right off. The impact wrench was just working against the inertia of the wheel. The counter-torque in my wrist was negligible. Impact wrenches are amazing as long as you don't use one with much torque to put a nut or bolt onto something. That can render it unremovable even by an impact wrench.
 

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The old time machinist cutting fluid was a glob of lard, a sprinkle of flours of sulfur and several drops of Wintergreen Oil to keep the flies out of it. If you find a tin can with half inch of lead poured in the bottom, it's most likely some kind of lube pot. The lead keeps a Vienna sausage can more stable and harder to knock off the machine.
 

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I've used Kroil for years and highly recommend it. But unless you really know what you're all about I would stay away from any form of heat such as a torch of any kind. That's a job for a real gun smith that's been in the business for a while. A standard electric heat gun might be OK if you take it out of the stock of course but even then an electric heat gun is capable of some pretty high temperatures on thin steel. Be careful. Pouring boiling water over the outside that's 212 won't hurt anything but it will make the Kroil penetrate really well.
 

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Uncle Nick hit the mark with using Liquid Wrench. It’s about the best thing I’ve ever found for getting two parts apart. You just need to give it a little time to work, but work it does.
 

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After decades of working on cars & guns, & years working on concrete pumps (totally amazing the places grout can penetrate), here are a few observations.

I'm sure most of you already know these things, but I gotta be "Mr. Obvious" here. I'm going to repeat a lot of the above, hopefully in an organized manner w/additions.

1) An air or electric powered impact gun is usually great at removing stuck stuff. HOWEVER, you have to have an incredibly tight fitting socket to avoid messing up the part you are whacking on! Just look at the chrome lug nuts of your car after a trip to the tire shop for evidence. It can help if you torque the socket against the nut in the direction you're gonna hammer.

2) If you choose to use the wrench & hammer route, also pick your tightest fitting box end wrench. The Oklahoma Socket Set (aka Cresent wrench) is a no-no, as is an open end wrench. Try, in order, rubber mallet, rawhide hammer, dead blow plastic hammer, steel hammer. The rate at which you transfer energy (how much impact gets to the stuck item, bolt, nut, plug) from hammer to the wrench is a function of the relative hardness between wrench & hammer. Apply as much torque to the wrench as you can before you hit it.

3) Solvents can be a good thing. I would hesitate to use any "rust dissolving" solvents on a blued gun. Bluing is a form of rust. Test on an inconspicuous spot before going whole hog. Maybe a spot that is covered by the stock?

4) Lubricants should be cool. They should not affect bluing. Thinner (lighter weight, less viscous) will flow/creep into tight joints.

5) Use of heat. Heat (technically a temperature increase above ambient) can be a good thing in moderation. Extremely hot heat like burning flames can quickly overheat metals & cause discoloration, ruining finishes. Electric heat guns can too, but are slower to heat & thus easier to control. Heat will allow lubricants to penetrate faster (effectively reducing viscosity). Heat will also help rust solvents act faster. Old rule of thumb, every 10° C of temp doubles the chemical reaction. As a reference point, the temp where you can no longer constantly hold your hand on a surface is pretty close to 50°C. With the possible exceptions of chefs & masochists.

Hope this has been instructive to someone.
 

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Sometimes took several attempts over a week, but don't remember a breech plug that didn't eventually let go with the heat/penetrating oil/vibration. (except for the welded ones).

One additional trick is to plug the nipple/vent...add oil...heat...a firm patch on a rod, and "pogo stick" the cleaning rod firmly. A little forced hydraulics won't hurt, and it releases a lot of frustration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It's been standing up soaking in kroil for a few days now. Didn't get around to it for awhile. Been busy with work and "Honey Dos".
 

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I have an early 80's TC Hawken that I built from a kit. If I remember correctly with it, the breech plug was never removable. YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have an early 80's TC Hawken that I built from a kit. If I remember correctly with it, the breech plug was never removable. YMMV.
I've got one my uncle gave me that he built from a kit. But, the one I've been working on is a CVA Staghorn inline. Cheap inline rifle. I got it out Yesterday. Didn't have to use propane torch either. The Kroil worked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Got another that I need to tackle. It's a old H&R Huntsman .58 cal. When I got it, it was already stuck. I've used Kroil on it with no luck. Probably heat it and see how that goes.
 

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This may sound stupid and it took me a couple of minutes and some cussin to remove a breach plug from a 58 cal. . I finally remembered that the nipple served as a lock against the breach plug and after I came to my senses I removed the nipple and the plug screwed out easily.
 
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