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This thread perhaps should be under the "your neck of the woods" because I don't live in Idaho, but I am sure thinking about moving there. I was just reading the Idaho hunting regulations. One thing that really stood out to me was the definition of the muzzleloading rifle, which I was so enthused to read that I was doing the 'ol arm pump in agreement. Idaho does not allow the use in-line muzzleloaders firing sabotted bullets. Good for them!

I have always been opposed to the use of the in-line muzzleloaders which, in my opinion, were developed to skirt the laws for using "primitive weapons" as some states call them thereby defeating the intended purpose of those laws. I don't like it.

I was glad to see Idaho requires the use of actual primitively styled muzzleloading rifles. I hunt in Indiana where in-lines are considered legal muzzleloaders and I disagree. I have hunted deer with my muzzleloader, a Hawkens rifle with a patched round ball.

I know I will step on someone's toes with this opinion, I do not intend to offend. I was just glad to see that Idaho, in my opinion, got it right.

I will scout out more of Idaho next summer as a future place for the wife and I to live, what a beautiful state with abundant recreational opportunities.

Best regards,

Terry
 

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I, too, am a fan of traditional BP rifles, inlines just don't do it for me but I'm happy that others enjoy theirs. My state recently changed the regs to also allow single shot rifles of, I think, 38 caliber or larger. There are certain technicalites as too which style of rifles are allowed but basically the 45-70 is the caliber of choice. And yes, the H&R handi-rifles in 45-70 are allowed and became big sellers overnight.

Now that single shot 45-70's are allowed during what was once ML only season, inlines will soon fade away around here. I haven't seen a traditional ML for sale in any store in several years and I don't recall seeing an inline in stores since the regs changed.

I don't care, really. It's not like my side-lock patched round ball rifle is "illegal", I can still hunt with it during what they now call "primitive weapons season". We've got enough deer around hear so if people want to take advantage of an extra two weeks to hunt with a scoped, single shot 45-70 loaded with Hornady's pointed Leverevolution ammo, fine... what ever blows their hair back. I'll stick to my traditional iron-sighted, sidelocked, patched-round-ball, loaded with real black powder, rifle because I love shooting them no matter what part of the season I'm in.
 

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Inlines are the norm here in Vt. When I do choose to Smoke Pole hunt which is not every year I hunt with a Renagade with a Williams peep. Inlines are for sales and revanue. I've always said that it should be traditional with no scope. Good for Idaho. Here in Vt. money talks and BS walks.
 

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I concur with the sentements posted above. I recognize the right of hunters within the respective regulations to hunt with whatever the state defines as a legal weapon. Where I have problems is confusing the spirit and what I believe to be the intent of "muzzleloader" season with the march of technology. In good conscience I simply do not accept that an in-line, scope sighted, sabot loaded rifle is consistent with the original definition of a muzzleloader as a flint/percussion, iron sighted, patched ball weapon. To each his own but hunting is in my final analysis a test of skill and craft; if believe you need more of both when you accept the limitations and challenges of a traditionally defined muzzleloader.
 

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Pennsylvania has two muzzleloader seasons. The antlerless season in October allows just about any muzzleloader and sights. The "primitive" season after Christmas is flintlock only and iron sights. I hunt both seasons with a .50 or .54 flintlock. Just my preference. All the best...
Gil
 

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If legal, why should it matter what someone else hunts with? As long as it is legal, hunt with it. If you are one of those that want to dress like Daniel Boone, carry a flintlock, and hunt in the spirit of our ancestors.. more power too you. If you are one that wants to carry an inline and get to spend some addiitional time in the woods and maybe add some venison to the freezer, good hunting.

Many of the states that allow in lines, scopes, smokeless powder, sabots, etc.. do so for reasons of herd management and the purchase of license numbers. The more people in the sport the more health we are should a problem that needs all our support becomes.

Personally I hunt with both modern and traditional rifles. Does one give me more enjoyment? Well I guess I liked shooting my flintlocks, but I also like all my rifles no matter what the ignition systems. IMO the real thing that gives one a bigger advantage over the other is a scope. With out a scope, all m y rifles are basically equal. I will not shoot past 100 yards if I do not have to.
 

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I wouldn't get to excited yet. Idaho DOES allow inlines as long as they have an exposed #11 cap. They also allow scopes for people that have a doctors slip. I have yet to hear what that will be like. When it comes to short range anything is the rule and use what ever is the latest and greatest.
This year the IDFG commission voted to NOT allow sabots. That was a good thing at least in my book. Our local F&G office was goiong to SLASH permit numbers if the sabots were allowed.
I wish we would go back to the old rule of old styled guns. Ron
 

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Muzzleloader season?
We don't even have a muzzleloader season in Montana.
There are certain isolated "Weapons Restriction" areas that require muzzleloader, shotgun or traditional handgun for safety reasons, but during the general hunting season we just use our front stuffers along with the short mag and AR boys.
..
 

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Personally, I enjoy using both, although I haven't really liked the sabot usage. I prefer a 385 gr. Great Plains bullet or Round ball. I have a .50 Hawken, .50 Kentucky Pistol and a .50 Buckstalker modern. I like the modern design for hunting and put a Tru-Glo aftermarket Ghostring & glowing front globe site on it. Big improvement over the factory sights, which broke after a couple outings in the cold. I don't really care for scopes and have only one on a .22 bolt action rifle that I use to shoot ground squirrels, woodchucks and such. I also have Kwik-Sight Scope Mounts and find that quite often I'll use the iron sights for offhand in lieu of the scope. ;) I love the look and feel of my Hawken though and can shoot the 10x10 gong at 75 yards with my 10-1/2" barreled pistol. I think it's a case of, "to each his own". I love shooting all kinds of weapons personally, albeit I'm not a real fan of small leads. My center fires are .45-70 gov and .45 Colt ;)
 

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I feel that "Primitive Weapon" is just that. A wheel lock, flintlock or percussion with iron sights, shooting loose powder and a round ball or traditional lead conical. Not some fiberglass stock, fluted stainless steel barrel shooting pellets and a hollow pointed pistol bullet wrapped in plastic with a big scope on top. I just figure that those with these modern things are not up to the challenge. Who needs a scope at muzzle loading range? If someone needs a doctor slip in order to use a scope, they shouldn't be in the woods with a loaded weapon. Just my opinion. Like something else, everyone has one.
 

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Some people also feel that compound bows and crossbows are "cheating" and shouldn't be allowed during archery season. The guys who pointed out that the regulations are about money, license sales and herd management are on the right track. Personally, I don't even like muzzle-loaders, yet I own three of them, because Indiana has such dumb regulations on what you can hunt a deer with. I guess if I could use a real rifle during "gun" season, I wouldn't mind if the muzzle-loader season required primitive guns with exposed lock mechanisms and no sabot-launched bullets. As things stand, I truly appreciate the added range, accuracy and reliability one gets with a modern, scoped ML. It gives me an option during gun season that has the same range and lethality as a slug gun, w/o the punishing recoil.

My wife, who has not hunted outside of IN thus far, is 100% satisfied with her T/C Omega and sees no reason to use any other gun, for any deer hunting. Given her success with that gun, so far, it is difficult to argue with her. :)
 
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