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6ppc has been on the top of the winning list for 40 years, that's longer than any other br cartridge

In context your right doesn't matter when it comes to hunting cartridges or guns. In a lever gun the ability of the gun to feed the cartridge is a priority, keeping your wildcat close to the same length and shape as your host gun was designed for is a good idea.
 

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Case shape has nothing to do with accuracy. How well that case fits the chamber does.
Well said.... and it's very well understood some that some chamber shapes are easier to machine accurately AND make brass to fit them 'better' and more consistently.

Straight, Solid and Square equals Accuracy.

Study the Machine Tapers section of Machinery handbook to see the calculations that go into 'self holding' and 'auto releasing' tapers. You see exactly the same thing in case design!

Most don't know that common drill press chucks are held on by a simple taper. They're not threaded on, but simply degreased and pressed in place by hand. They stay there until wedged off. A case in a chamber is no different and if the case didn't 'draw-back' a skunch (gunsmith measurement) the extractor wouldn't last very long pulling stuck cases. That's why hot loads 'stick'. The brass lost it's ability to 'draw back' and forces the gun to break it loose.
 

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Jack, follow with me on this for a minute.
On firing the firing pin pushes the case forward before piercing the primer
The flash ignites the powder going forward, if the powder is dense enough or the powder column long enough the primer will run out of burn before the powder column is completely ignited, this unignited powder can burn as it travels down the barrel but sometimes doesn't. If you've ever shot a big magnum over a light colored surface that's clean you will like be able to find kernels of powder that look just like they came out of the can on your bench. There's not a lot of consistency to this hence big spreads in velocities with some primer powder combinations in overbore cartridges, that equals inaccuracy.
Back to a chronological explanation of what happens when you fire the gun.
The case has been pushed to the front of the chamber, when enough pressure builds inside the case the soft brass expands and "grabs" the chamber walls.
That pressure pushes or expands the head of the case back to the bolt face, the case stretch occurs in the unsupported web of the case, that's why cases separate there and measurements of relative pressure of the load can be taken there and compared to factory cases.
Cases that are designed with lots of body taper have a harder time grabbing the case walls and therefore more bolt thrust{pressure back on the bolt}.
There are as with anything exceptions to these facts, my Swift separates cases in the middle of the cartridge after about a dozen reloadings, I was curious as to why and cross sectioned several of them, the thick part of the case is carried much farther up than on normal modern cases, that in conjunction with a little to much body taper is what causes the case separations. The good news is the front half of the case falls out of the gun rarely sticking because of that taper.
 

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Anything Jes could do if only cause it would be done right
 

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Kevinbear-- You have the chronology down pretty well but don't forget the violent separation of the case and primer when the primer ignites. IF the case can move, it will. All this illustrates why 'headspace' is the most important dimension in any rifle. Consider nail laying on an anvil with a 20 lb. hammer on top of the nail. You can push on that hammer by several hundred pounds without flattening the nail, but drop that hammer an inch and it'll leave a mark! Same with a rifle cartridge and the bolt in the action. As long as everything in tension so nothing moves, there is no wear and tear but for the bore, but if you let a case rattle around in the chamber that means the bolt is rattling around in the action and on firing considerable stress is placed in important places. Six thousandths of an inch excess headspace will wreck brass in a hurry and eventually the rifle. The solution is to not re-size the body of the case, only the neck.
 

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I use Wilson tap tap dies if I'm really trying to find out what a gun will do, on regular screw/O-press dies I remove the firing pin and cocking piece from the bolt and size the cases so there's a tiny bit of tension as the bolt cams down on a sized case the first time I set the die.
Hard to do that on a lever gun and you probably wouldn't want to anyway as most are used for hunting except for a few cowboy shooters across the country.

What do you think about a 6.5x30-30 win imp?
Here's a few good bullets.
The 125 Grendel bullet mold.
.264 -6.5mm, NOE Bullet Moulds

This could be a great bullet for it, probably have to put the finished bullets in a die and shave the fronts flat.
266-130GC Double Cavity

You would defiantly want to make sure you have a new spring in your magazine before loading it up and shooting.
 

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Interesting idea ! The guy to talk to about this is Adam at Ranger Point Precision. They have worked with 6mm conversions for leverguns and they are top notch in these endeavors.



I use Wilson tap tap dies if I'm really trying to find out what a gun will do, on regular screw/O-press dies I remove the firing pin and cocking piece from the bolt and size the cases so there's a tiny bit of tension as the bolt cams down on a sized case the first time I set the die.
Hard to do that on a lever gun and you probably wouldn't want to anyway as most are used for hunting except for a few cowboy shooters across the country.

What do you think about a 6.5x30-30 win imp?
Here's a few good bullets.
The 125 Grendel bullet mold.
.264 -6.5mm, NOE Bullet Moulds

This could be a great bullet for it, probably have to put the finished bullets in a die and shave the fronts flat.
266-130GC Double Cavity

You would defiantly want to make sure you have a new spring in your magazine before loading it up and shooting.
 

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Pointed Bullets Needed

Last I checked pointed bullets don't work well in a tube magazine.
Therefore Marlin no good for 400 yards.
Agree with previous post, get a Savage 99 in 250 or a Browning BLR in 243.
Good Luck.
 

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Last I checked pointed bullets don't work well in a tube magazine.
Therefore Marlin no good for 400 yards.
Agree with previous post, get a Savage 99 in 250 or a Browning BLR in 243.
Good Luck.
You are correct although if you load the chamber and one in the magazine you have 2 shot repeater.
I hunted coyotes with Remington accelerators as a teenager with my 336A, most of the time two shots were all I needed, Marlins feed very well with cartridges dropped in the port so a 3rd and 4th shot is not out of the question. If you need more than that you should probably get an modern semi-auto like a R-25.
 

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I agree with the point made by others, that if you want a 'long range' (300 and + yards) lever action rifle you should choose a lever action that feeds from a box mag. The Browning BLR is the best of those in my opinion. Have it barreled / chambered on anything based on the .308 Win case, wildcat or not, to suit your desire. Heck have the BLR done up in the new long range darling of today, the 6.5 Creedmoore. That will get you the range and accuracy our fore fathers only dreamed of with their levers. Now if you want a traditional lever Wildcat on say a Marlin 336 type action, the only one that I can recall as being easy to create and maintain is the 30-30 case blown out straight and shooting 40 cal (.400) bullets. You can use 200g 40 cal XTP bullets as a start (Hornady makes them, mostly for 10mm Auto). You will be able to shoot that 200 grain 40 cal at least as fast, if not bit faster that the 170g 30 cal from the 30-30. Also you could go beyond the 40K CUP limit of the 30-30 to say around 47K CUP. 30-30 brass will be around for a LONG time and not expensive, and 40 cal bullets will also be around due to the 40 S&W and 10 mm Auto. A 200g 40 call bullet at 2200 or more FPS is nothing to complain about. Anything inside 150 yrds is deep trouble if pointed its way.
 

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What do you think about a 6.5x30-30 win imp?
Here's a few good bullets.
The 125 Grendel bullet mold.
.264 -6.5mm, NOE Bullet Moulds

This could be a great bullet for it, probably have to put the finished bullets in a die and shave the fronts flat.
266-130GC Double Cavity
The introduction of the 6.5 Grendel is a good thing, as it means more bullets of medium to light weight, for caliber. The 6.5 JDJ (or 6.5x30-30 AI) will benefit from such.
 

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The introduction of the 6.5 Grendel is a good thing...
I'm toying within my mind a 6.5mm Grendel variant. I'd use 30-06 brass and have the finished product be 0.05 inches longer than a Grendel. Shoulder angle would be twenty-four degrees. Neck length would be around .300 inches. Mine would never fit into an AR-15; my thinking is to put a new barrel onto one of those Ruger RPR contraptions and go with that. Of course, the whole she-bang would require forming dies and reloading dies ground out by Hornady. I have no picture to post; just started thinkin' about this a few days ago.

I wish I had known way back in 2003 and 2004 that target rifles are not .30-caliber, and are especially not magnums. Had I known, I would have never developed the .300 Nevada Desert Magnum. The .358 Sierra Stomper would have never come to be, either. These medium-bore rifles just recoil too much for the shooter to fire seventy rounds in a competition. That's why target rifles are 6mm, 6.5mm and 7mm, and have appropriate powder charges. My Desert Magnum uses around sixty-eight grains of powder to get a 180-grain bullet up to 3000 fps. I s'pose I can attain 3000 fps from a 6.5mm bullet using less than 45 grains of powder. I am no expert, but I recall reading that the recoil generated is dependent upon the mass of the powder consumed. So much we learn too far down the road...
 

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Most don't know that common drill press chucks are held on by a simple taper. They're not threaded on, but simply degreased and pressed in place by hand. They stay there until wedged off.
Those of us who took Shop as seventh-graders in 1970-71 know this taper to be the galactically-famous Morse taper. The machining to have the inside and outside tapers match surely has to be on the order of 1:10,000. I doubt 1:1000 would provide the required grip. Somebody please correct me if I am wrong.
 

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That shows how much attention you were paying in the 7th grade. Drill press chucks are Jacob's taper. Morse Taper is in drill bits and lathe tailstocks. :p

The Jacobs taper for most home drill presses with 1/2 chuck is a #2 Jacobs Taper. The next sizes up are #33 and #6. Taper per foot is .97861 inches. Very near a 1-12 taper. Tolerances on such tapers are on the order of .0002" and both socket and plug are ground to get that accuracy. Gauge blocks and sine bars and Best Test indicator country.
 

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PO Ackley noted that performance could be enhanced in the 348 WCF. His answer is in Vol 1, and the 348 AckImp
was one of his favorites. It actually will increase velocity across all bullet weights in the 348 from 175-200 FPS.

Of course, this wildcat 348 bore is made for serious hunting, as in Alaska-Canada. It is one of the most economical
ways to turn a Model 71 into a lever action 35 Whelen equivalent. I have one, and it really handles well-
with proven results on moose. If bears come to the skinning area, you are far from unarmed.
 
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