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Hello, I need some assistance identifying an old rifle.

This rifle, which I believe to be a Kar98K, based on what info I have discovered so far, belongs to my father. He hasn't shot it in years, and shows some hesitancy in doing so, not knowing the history of the weapon (was it ever used in action, what unit it potentially served, etc).









 

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Welcome to the Forum

The rifle is a Kar98k from WWII and was made at the Mauser Works in 1943. It appears to have various numbers on different parts of the rifle which means it is not matching. That happened a lot with captured military rifles during the war. The rifle may have seen service during WWII. However, I doubt that it would be possible to determine with what unit it saw service. Hope this helps. Glad to see you here. i am sure others will post with more information. All the best...
Gil
 

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I appreciate the assistance. This was the first on the short list. The other two are a .303 and a Walther P38 (separate subforum). I need to retake those photos as they're rather fuzzy.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Wow, that is a nice looking K98, if the bore looks good and you can get the headspace checked I would for sure take it to the range.
 

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Ditto on what Mike said!! Very nice rifle.
 

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downtx,

Welcome to the Forum. Military arms have a history and I prefer them to commercial products.

As Gil Martin said, you have a "Mis-Matched" Kar98k. It is too bad the bolt serial number does not match the receiver serial number. There is a Very Good reason for that. My uncle Marty told me that in April 1945, while he was part of Patton's 3rd Army, the Germans in Austria and Czechoslovakia fled Westward into American lines in preference to becoming Soviet POWs. The American soldiers took possession of the German soldiers' rifles, removed the bolts and tossed the rifle to the Right into the ditch and tossed the bolt to the Left into the other road ditch. After while, there were big piles of both rifles and bolts SEPARATE from each other.

Your rifle most probably served Very Much after it was made in 1943 at Mauser Werke. In the "Final Days" of Germany, it would be impossible to document how many hands your arm went through until the German surrender on May 8, 1945. You have a parts gun with a history, in my humble opinion. Is this rifle a bring back from WWII by your father?

Again, welcome to the site and chat about your other military arms.

Webley
 

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Negative Webley, my father was born in the sixties, and while he did serve in the United States Armed Forces, like his father before him, it was for an entirely different war. I gave him a ring and apparently it belonged to my maternal grandfather, who purchased it in Athens, GA. I rang up my mother, who said he did all his business at Franklin Gun Shop, which is also where he more than likely obtained the .303 and the P38 (which I will post later). Grandpa served with VMB-433 initially on Emirau. I'm sure he saw the value here and wanted to preserve some of his nation's history for us. That or he loved the weapons of the period, I can't say for sure.
 
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