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Discussion Starter #1
I recently picked up a Velo-Dog as part of a lot and was examining this neat little piece.

Despite the fact that all the data-sheets on these seem to suggest that they chambered 5.75 mm, .22 LR, or .25 ACP, this one has a barrel that measures 32/100th of an inch (aka. .32 caliber) on the inside of the barrel when I measure it with calipers.

Since putting the wrong round in a firearm can damage that firearm, even if the round appears to fit, I was wondering how I could definitively determine the proper round for this firearm?
 

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Expansion on the short comment by mjyeagle:
Is it a single shot? Or is it a Revolver?
Chamber cast(s) of each 'chamber' should be made to find out the case chamber diameters and lengths.
This will give you some starting dimensions to chase in references.
It is necessary to cast all chambers of a Revolver to find out the tolerances of the original design.
The Bore/Groove diameters as measured on a "Slug' driven through the Barrel will provide guidance looking the cartridge up in references.
NOTE: older design cartridges used heeled bullets with outside lube grooves so the chambers usually measure longer than the actual case length of reference tables.

Best Regards,
Chev. William
 

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While velo-dogs are superbly crafted and quality pieces for the most part, I would be very hesitant (as in, I wouldn't do it with mine) in putting ammo in it.

Mine just sits on a shelf until I can find a suitable display for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
While velo-dogs are superbly crafted and quality pieces for the most part, I would be very hesitant (as in, I wouldn't do it with mine) in putting ammo in it.

Mine just sits on a shelf until I can find a suitable display for it.

Greetings BearBio,

While nearly all of my firearms are reproductions, I do have an Springfield '84 Rifle that was 'carbinized' long before I acquired it and likely before I was born.

I've thoroughly enjoyed shooting this piece by employing low velocity "cowboy action" loads and have begun hand-loading these rounds (I also use 'cowboy action' loads in my conversion pistols but Evil Roy rounds are just too inexpensive to bother hand loading).

I assumed that, once I confirm the caliber, I'd use either purchased or hand-loaded cowboy action rounds (in addition to at-least one cyan pepper load I saw in a period advertisement as well) for use in the Velo-Dog.

I can see no obvious signs of stress fractures or wear (beyond cosmetic wear to the bluing).

How would/should I definitely determine if this unique piece is safe to operate with low velocity cowboy-action loads???
 

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Try Dye Penetrant or Magnetic Particle Crack testing as either will show up cracks that are not normally visible.
Best Regards,
Chev. William
 

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Greetings BearBio,

While nearly all of my firearms are reproductions, I do have an Springfield '84 Rifle that was 'carbinized' long before I acquired it and likely before I was born.

I've thoroughly enjoyed shooting this piece by employing low velocity "cowboy action" loads and have begun hand-loading these rounds (I also use 'cowboy action' loads in my conversion pistols but Evil Roy rounds are just too inexpensive to bother hand loading).

I assumed that, once I confirm the caliber, I'd use either purchased or hand-loaded cowboy action rounds (in addition to at-least one cyan pepper load I saw in a period advertisement as well) for use in the Velo-Dog.

I can see no obvious signs of stress fractures or wear (beyond cosmetic wear to the bluing).

How would/should I definitely determine if this unique piece is safe to operate with low velocity cowboy-action loads???
I bought my Velo-dog on a whim. It was in great shape and had a low sticker price.

I do shoot a large number (maybe 30 or more) pistols and rifles that are antiques. With Colt single actions, anything below 192,000 is generally considered safe with low power smokeless loads. Lower that that, I shoot black powder loads. Except for my woods guns (OM Ruger Blackhawks for the most part), I don't "magnumize" any of mine (I live in marginal grizzly area). It is important to research what you have as well as you can. For example, some '03s are considered unsafe and the pressure curve on "regular" 30-06 may batter an M-1 Garand.

It's important to remember that smokeless has a different pressure curve than black powder. The ultimate pressure may be the same but the slope leading to it may be drastically different. Even cowboy loads are usually loaded with smokeless. Fortunately, loading BP is easy. Just loosely fill the case to the brim and seat your bullet. In small cases I use a standard primer but in big cases (like 45-90), I use a magnum.
 
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