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Hello all, I recently acquired this 1899 Winchester 94 chambered in 30 WCF, and have been searching for information on it. I sent some pictures to a friend, and he was pretty sure that it's been nickel-plated, which I understand to be a pretty big deal according to my friends who only collect Winchesters. Do any of you have any insight or information on this rifle? I mainly collect military rifles, so this is a bit out of my wheelhouse, and any help of advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!
P.S. I've linked my photobucket underneath where all the photos I've taken of the rifle are, please let me know if this link doesn't work or if you'd like more photos, and I'll do my best to remedy the situation.

dpole30's Recent Uploads | Photobucket
 

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That age Model 1894 would have a silver plated receiver if it's engraved and ordered with that option. If somebody just nickle plated an old M-94, may his cleaning patches be acid. It is ruined for any sort of collector value and actually greatly degraded from what the same gun in 'rough' shape is worth.

Email me a couple pics and I'll post them for you. j belk 09 at gmail dot com
 

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The SN ending in 500 indicates that it might be a presentation gun, as gun companies quite often reserved numbers ending in multiple zeroes for special uses; which is supported by the unmolested/sharp-edged SN digits under the plating - which could be either nickel or (more likely) silver.

Your rifle's SN indicates that it was made in 1900.

The only way to know for sure if it left the factory with the plating would be to obtain a Cody Letter of Authentication for it from the Winchester Museum in Cody, Wyoming ($$$).


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Now I can see the pictures. Silver plated receiver and looks to be original and rough.
 

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"Value" is in the buyer's court. If the bore is good, the gun could be a candidate for a full Turnbull style restoration....for somebody with enough green.
It's value as a collector is very limited and as a shooter even more so, but it could be declared safe by a qualified gunsmith.
If I saw it at a gunshow, I'd expect to see an optimistic $1500 on it and hoping for a grand.
 

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At the time your rifle was made, both Nickel or Silver plating was optional - as I stated above the best way to determine which would be to get it lettered (a Cody Letter, in and of itself, would add a little value)

Even though your rifle has the optional, but regularly-encountered, 3-leaf 34C express rear sight, "condition" is everything when considering a value - which is how much somebody would be willing to pay you for what you have, today (not whenever).

"Condition" refers to the remaining percentage of original finish on wood & metal parts, and the absence of any after-production, non-factory modifications.

If that rifle were in a 95%+ original condition, IMO it would be worth well North of $2500; but in that condition, with the deteriorated plating & rust/pitting, is (also IMO) most likely worth a little less than $1K-$1500 - IF you could find a collector who would like it, to fill a vacant slot in his collection until he could find another in better condition.

If you have a Winchester friend/acquaintance in your circle that thinks it's a big deal, AND you want to sell it, I would suggest selling it to one of them - unless their offers are low-ball.

If you get low-balled, I would put it up in an online guns-only auction.


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Just a point of interest, maybe--- Winchester M-94s were available plated with silver, nickle and rarely, gold. The pictured rifle shows typical silver plate failure with speckles of rust between original plating.

Nickle plating is applied over a 'wash' of copper first. Nickle wears off and can be eventually bubbled by interior pitting, but silver is the one that flakes and rust as seen here.
 
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