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I recently got a free rough shaped Weatherby style stock that is not inletted at all. I'm going to use this stock to learn on and I have no problem with the exterior or even fitting the action if it was started. However, I have no idea how to actually start to get action/barrel inletted. I've searched the internet and don't seem to be able to find any videos or books or even advice. Anybody know of a source I can get?
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Yes - Called "Complete Guide to Gunsmithing - Gun Care and Repair, by Charles Edward Chapel. Mine is the 3rd printing of 1970.
 

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Starting on page #20 of the attached link, you can see a stock go from block-of-wood to gunstock.

http://garagegunsmithing.com/index.php?option=com_jfusion&Itemid=56

I've done a fair number of stocks and the absolutely most difficult to do are those with a finished outside and 0% inside. The problem is that you have to make the inside match the outside. Starting with a block-of-wood allows you to fit the inside with nice square surfaces to hold/line up to/measure from and then you just whittle the outside to the desired shape. Here's a mini-project I did making a new grip for a Dan Wesson Revolver.... the principles of inletting remain the same.
http://garagegunsmithing.com/index.php?option=com_jfusion&Itemid=56
The principles are to make sure of each cut before you do it, measure often, don't rush the job.

I use the mill as much as I can to keep things square but if you are doing it with hand tools, use a square to confirm you are keeping it square.

What are you thinking of sinking into the stock? What tools do you have at your disposal? If I knew the action and the workshop, I could offer a bit of insight on where to start.

Here's one I raised from a puppy (glued layers to make laminate, etc...)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks to both of you for the info. I had no idea that website was around! Since I'm much better with tools than I am at computers, tell me where to go once I get to the website. Do I search for a topic, a posting ?? Following the link gets me to the main page but I'm not sure where to go from there to see the specific topics. As an aside, I have about every hand tool known to man (wife's opinion). I don't have a milling machine but I've built many jigs in the past for similar operations. I would expect to use a detail router and a jig to hog out some of the gross wood, but use rifflers and chisels for the rest. As you say, thankfully the stock is only rough formed so I do have some leeway. I haven't decided just yet, but I'm thinking of inletting it for an SKS. I've also got a .22 bolt action that I might use but that would mean slimming the stock a whole lot more. We'll see. Let me know about the links, I'm anxious to see what's there.
 

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When you get to the main index, go to "On The Workbench", then to "Out of Nothing".

The post, "The HRD Falling Block" has some nice play-by-play and some how-to on stock making. Also, the post, "Another scratch built bolt action" shows a method of making a simple jig for your router to cut the main barrel channel straight as well as hogging out much of the area for the receiver. Your detail router would work well for this method.

I would recommend you not do the SKS as your first inletting (or even your 5th) as they are quite difficult to get correct. The 22 would be a great candidate for your first stock inletting. They typically have nice, clean round recievers that lend themselves well to either of the above methods.
 

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Inletting a barrel in a gunstock with router

Starting on page #20 of the attached link, you can see a stock go from block-of-wood to gunstock.

http://garagegunsmithing.com/index.php?option=com_jfusion&Itemid=56

I've done a fair number of stocks and the absolutely most difficult to do are those with a finished outside and 0% inside. The problem is that you have to make the inside match the outside. Starting with a block-of-wood allows you to fit the inside with nice square surfaces to hold/line up to/measure from and then you just whittle the outside to the desired shape. Here's a mini-project I did making a new grip for a Dan Wesson Revolver.... the principles of inletting remain the same.
http://garagegunsmithing.com/index.php?option=com_jfusion&Itemid=56
The principles are to make sure of each cut before you do it, measure often, don't rush the job.

I use the mill as much as I can to keep things square but if you are doing it with hand tools, use a square to confirm you are keeping it square.

What are you thinking of sinking into the stock? What tools do you have at your disposal? If I knew the action and the workshop, I could offer a bit of insight on where to start.

Here's one I raised from a puppy (glued layers to make laminate, etc...)
Dear Cobbler,

I tried to follow your link above about a stock going from block-of-wood to gunstock. It doesn't work anymore, as it seems all items before 2009 have been deleted.:( However, I would love to read the file you uploaded. Could you send it to me, or can I download it somewhere.

Thanks in advance from Holland.

Kind regards,

Pauline
 

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I have inletted exactly one blank stock -- took a long time, but eventually turned out rather well. Having no instruction source, I had a friend rout a groove down the center of the stock. Then, with chisels, knives, sanding blocks, etc. I removed everything that got in the way of the barreled action.

More detailed directions to follow would have been nice but, essentially, that's how it's done.
 

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A suggestion to get started, looking at top of stock, side where receiver/barrel will be....try to find center line between edges.

Hopefully you have the original stock you are replacing....if so make a pattern of its top inletted area for receiver. Thick paper, thin wood, whatever, cut/shape it to fit the inlet on old stock. Then place pattern on top of new stock, making sure centered on your stocks center line. Of course you need to figure out how far forward or rearware the pattern needs to go. Place your top pattern, trace around it and start wood removal.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I have inletted exactly one blank stock -- took a long time, but eventually turned out rather well. Having no instruction source, I had a friend rout a groove down the center of the stock. Then, with chisels, knives, sanding blocks, etc. I removed everything that got in the way of the barreled action.

More detailed directions to follow would have been nice but, essentially, that's how it's done.
Not a bad description. People ask me how to make handgun stocks.... I tell 'em it's easy, just cut away the parts of the wood you don't need. Presto! You have a set of stocks... :D
 

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I used a router for most all of the inletting. Make jigs and fixures, fences and alot of set-up seemed to work well for me. If the stock is already shaped it might be difficult. You need the stock square to keep everything square.
Jim
 

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Forstner bits in a drill press will work well. Measure very carefully and clean up the ridges left with a razor sharp chisel. I've inletted four stocks this way and all have ended up well.
 

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Not a bad description. People ask me how to make handgun stocks.... I tell 'em it's easy, just cut away the parts of the wood you don't need. Presto! You have a set of stocks... :D
Thats what great sculptors do. If you want to make a statue of a dog, you just remove everything that doesn't look like a dog. Its simple
 
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